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beet pulp

This is a discussion on beet pulp within the Horse Nutrition forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Beet pulp pellets horses
  • Feeding beet pulp pellets to horses

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    11-24-2011, 06:02 AM
  #1
Foal
beet pulp

I am interested in hearing the features and benefits of beet pulp. I have a healthy 7 year old gelding.
     
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    11-24-2011, 09:08 AM
  #2
Started
Most people use beet pulp as a forage, rather than an energy source, because it's 10% protein and 18% fiber. It also has a low glycemic index, which means feeds like this: "cause little or no sharp rise to blood glucose levels and generally provide most of their energy in the form of volatile fatty acids, the energy by-product of fermentation in the equine cecum and large colon."

Beet pulp is safe to feed in large quantities and can be used to increase a horse's calorie intake without increasing the likelihood of colic (like you may if you increased concentrated feed).

There are numerous myths floating about about beet pulp, but most are completely untrue. It doesn't cause horses to choke... although horses who bolt their feed may be more likely to choke on unsoaked beet pulp pellets; it's the owner's responsibility to do something about the bolting issue. It also doesn't have to be soaked, although some horses seem to prefer that (it will sour in the summer if it's soaked too long).

If your horse is healthy then you don't really need to feed beet pulp, but it's one of those things that wouldn't necessarily hurt either. It'll provide more fiber and a few more calories, along with making sure he stays hydrated (if you feed it soaked), which is helpful in the summer heat and in the winter when some horses don't drink enough water. It's also used by a lot of people to feed supplements - horses can't sift the powder off of soaked beet pulp like they can with a dry feed.
Appyt likes this.
     
    11-25-2011, 09:11 AM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by My Beau    
Most people use beet pulp as a forage, rather than an energy source, because it's 10% protein and 18% fiber. It also has a low glycemic index, which means feeds like this: "cause little or no sharp rise to blood glucose levels and generally provide most of their energy in the form of volatile fatty acids, the energy by-product of fermentation in the equine cecum and large colon."

Beet pulp is safe to feed in large quantities and can be used to increase a horse's calorie intake without increasing the likelihood of colic (like you may if you increased concentrated feed).

There are numerous myths floating about about beet pulp, but most are completely untrue. It doesn't cause horses to choke... although horses who bolt their feed may be more likely to choke on unsoaked beet pulp pellets; it's the owner's responsibility to do something about the bolting issue. It also doesn't have to be soaked, although some horses seem to prefer that (it will sour in the summer if it's soaked too long).

If your horse is healthy then you don't really need to feed beet pulp, but it's one of those things that wouldn't necessarily hurt either. It'll provide more fiber and a few more calories, along with making sure he stays hydrated (if you feed it soaked), which is helpful in the summer heat and in the winter when some horses don't drink enough water. It's also used by a lot of people to feed supplements - horses can't sift the powder off of soaked beet pulp like they can with a dry feed.
I was advised against beet pulp. My stable owner said she had too many horses choke on it. However I do not have the details about those horses. My horse is very thin and losing teeth. Will he digest beet pulp?
     
    11-25-2011, 10:10 AM
  #4
dee
Started
Well soaked beet pulp is excellent for senior horses. We have had horses of various ages, from babies to true seniors, and they all did well with beet pulp as part of their diet.
     
    11-25-2011, 10:49 AM
  #5
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by pennycandie    
I am interested in hearing the features and benefits of beet pulp. I have a healthy 7 year old gelding.
that's the key. If you have a healthy 7 year old, why add the extra layer of work for no appreciable benefit? BP is a very expensive forage extender at over $450/ton right now.
     
    11-25-2011, 11:31 AM
  #6
Showing
I feed it soaked with grain three times a day. It helps keep weight on my hard-keepers and is easier for my senior to eat.
     
    11-25-2011, 01:31 PM
  #7
Started
Beet pulp is great for senior horses as mentioned, as it is easier to chew, and can be made into a mush. It helps gain weight, and is great for horses with a metabolic disease, such as Insulin Resistance, if they are a underweight as it helps gain weight with fiber, not with sugar or fat. If hay is scarce, it can help replace much of the fiber, I believe I read somewhere up to 30%.
     
    11-25-2011, 02:17 PM
  #8
Weanling
One thing I know about it is, it will cause random people flip out at you in the feed store. But as long as you go Aussie on them, it's ok.

My horses are in Full work, I use it for their wet feed in the evening. Supplements thrown in.
flytobecat likes this.
     
    11-25-2011, 02:39 PM
  #9
Trained
I feed beetpulp in the winter because it makes me feel good

I always take the pellets back to the house after feeding time, and put them to soak, so at the next feeding they are ready to go and at room temp, which means when it is below freezing outside, November to March, inclusive, :roll: my olds and youngs get a nice steaming meal!

I never look at it as anything other than a filler, a warmer and a great medium for mixing anything you like into feed, mineral supplement, cough meds, feed through wormer, a nice beet pulp mash makes all of those things disappear around here.
     
    11-25-2011, 05:33 PM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golden Horse    
I feed beetpulp in the winter because it makes me feel good

I always take the pellets back to the house after feeding time, and put them to soak, so at the next feeding they are ready to go and at room temp, which means when it is below freezing outside, November to March, inclusive, :roll: my olds and youngs get a nice steaming meal!

I never look at it as anything other than a filler, a warmer and a great medium for mixing anything you like into feed, mineral supplement, cough meds, feed through wormer, a nice beet pulp mash makes all of those things disappear around here.
What I have isn't pellets. It is flakes. Does that make a difference?
     

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