Boarder demanding horse off grain... (rant) - Page 2
   

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Boarder demanding horse off grain... (rant)

This is a discussion on Boarder demanding horse off grain... (rant) within the Horse Nutrition forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Will it harm a horse to give no hay or grain

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    12-19-2011, 11:14 AM
  #11
Green Broke
Why does the horse NEED grain?

Why not just give it more hay, so that it still has enough to eat and gain weight?

Which is basically what I said in my first post.... "Add more hay. Take away the grain."

That way both parties are happy. Their horse isn't getting grain, and you are still giving it enough food.
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    12-19-2011, 11:37 AM
  #12
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe4d    
Their horse their problem. You need to do what the owner says. If the horse isnt doing well report them for abuse.
It is also your barn, so you are free to tell them you don't like the way they care for their horse so they need to leave.
It doesn't work that way in the real world. The real world sees a thin horse and blames the BO/BM. No one says 'gee those folks must be telling their barn what to feed their horse'.

CARE of the horse falls under the responsibilty of the barn. A person should choose where to board based on the care they would like their horse to receive.
     
    12-19-2011, 11:57 AM
  #13
Trained
Most board contracts have some sort of feed clause in them. Mine says, " Dreamcatcher agrees to provide a clean facility and APPROPRIATE FEED & WATER TO MAINTAIN THE ANIMAL." So, if I were to give in to the demands of these folks, and someone called ACO because the horse was too thin, it's ME on the line for not feeding when I know better rather than them being too demanding. And in court, they would hold ME to a higher standard than an uneducated boarder (right or wrong they would say because I'm the BO I should have more knowlege and apply it) and giving in to their demands fails the 'Reasonable Man' theory. A reasonable man feeds his horse, not starves it. Therefore a reasonable man would refuse their requests.

If they kept it up and I got tired enough of it, I'd ask them to find another barn to board at. Sometimes you just can't find a common ground.
     
    12-19-2011, 11:57 AM
  #14
Started
They would be asked to leave if they didn't trust my judgement in how to feed their horse. I'd go ahead now if you don't want them to leave and photograph and have them document that they are fine with how their horse looks, so that they don't come back in the future when the horse has issues from malnourishment and say well, we asked her to fix and it she wouldn't feed our horse more.
     
    12-19-2011, 12:07 PM
  #15
Foal
I am glad to hear that the issue has been resolved!
Here is my two cents anyway...

As a boarder, I believe that the owner of the horse has the right to dictate how they want to care for their horse, however if the owner is making decisions that will cause harm to their horse or the barn's reputation due to their ignorance you will unfortunately be held responsible. It is your property. If the SPCA or the sherrif was called, you would probably be the one who gets cited. Also...in this age of sue happy litigation, the owners of the horse could perhaps hold you responsible if something bad happens to the horse due to the animals poor condition, citing that as the professional, you did not steer them in the right direction. Probably wouldn't happen and it wouldn't be right if it did, but it is possible.

I think you should protect yourself by putting your suggestions in a formal, signed letter, along with the new feeding schedule or plan you agreed upon with the owners. Tell them that it is just to ensure you are both on the same page and you want to make sure they are satisfied and happy customers.

If you have problems with them in the future, maybe they are not the right fit for your barn. No harm, no fowl.

Good Luck!
     
    12-19-2011, 01:10 PM
  #16
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by VelvetsAB    
Why does the horse NEED grain?

Why not just give it more hay, so that it still has enough to eat and gain weight?

Which is basically what I said in my first post.... "Add more hay. Take away the grain."

That way both parties are happy. Their horse isn't getting grain, and you are still giving it enough food.
Posted via Mobile Device
It sounds like that this horse is not a horse that can maintain weight on just hay.
The OP also said that the horse owner is not willing to pay for the extra hay.


I have to agree that this is one case where the barn owner is allowed to put their foot down and say that you are not willing to have an underweight horse on the property and ask them to leave if they are simply asking you to starve their horse into behaving.
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    12-19-2011, 02:22 PM
  #17
Weanling
Unhappy

Quote:
Originally Posted by VelvetsAB    
Why does the horse NEED grain?

Why not just give it more hay, so that it still has enough to eat and gain weight?

Which is basically what I said in my first post.... "Add more hay. Take away the grain."

That way both parties are happy. Their horse isn't getting grain, and you are still giving it enough food.
Posted via Mobile Device
Well, I never said the horse needed grain IF she was getting more hay, or more hay and a ration balancer. The horse reflects its feed schedule within a week of changing it, so all I am NOT willing to do is keep reducing her feed (which is what they asked). They keep coming to us saying "We think we want to cut this out of the horses diet" (my favorite was when, a week before a show they said "Will you please stop giving our horse grain this week, since we will be taking her to a show and want her to behave..." Uh, NO.) I told them that without changing other things (adding more hay, or swapping feeds, or adding a non-grain based balancer product) the horse would lose weight, and I'm not putting myself in a position to look responsible for starving an otherwise healthy horse. She is already at a minimum with grain and maximum with hay (at least in terms of what their board includes), and if they want to change the horse's diet, they need to do some research and come up with a decent plan before I'll discuss it with them again. If the horse maintained on straight hay, that would be one thing. I don't think the horse would actually have the desire to consume the amount of hay it would need to maintain itself.
     
    12-19-2011, 04:40 PM
  #18
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by erino49    
As a boarder, I believe that the owner of the horse has the right to dictate how they want to care for their horse,
Wrong.

No one has the right to dictate anything to me. The terms of the care are offered up front - prior to the horse arriving to be cared for by me. If the horse owner feels they need to dictate - they will be finding a new barn - REAL fast.

dic·tate

   /v. ˈdɪkteɪt, dɪkˈteɪt; n. ˈdɪkteɪt/ Show Spelled [v. Dik-teyt, dik-teyt; n. Dik-teyt] Show IPA verb, -tat·ed, -tat·ing, noun
verb (used with object)
To prescribe or lay down authoritatively or peremptorily; command unconditionally

















     
    12-20-2011, 03:33 PM
  #19
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by mls    
Wrong.

No one has the right to dictate anything to me. The terms of the care are offered up front - prior to the horse arriving to be cared for by me. If the horse owner feels they need to dictate - they will be finding a new barn - REAL fast.

dic·tate

   /v. ˈdɪkteɪt, dɪkˈteɪt; n. ˈdɪkteɪt/ Show Spelled [v. Dik-teyt, dik-teyt; n. Dik-teyt] Show IPA verb, -tat·ed, -tat·ing, noun
verb (used with object)
To prescribe or lay down authoritatively or peremptorily; command unconditionally
Haha... yeah, those kinds of situations don't really go well. If someone comes to me thinking that they can waltz up, bark an order like I'm their subordinate, and it will go okay, they'll learn REAL FAST otherwise. Their next step will be loading up their horse and taking it down the road... within the next 5 minutes. That is inexcusable. Common courtesy and respect is required in dealing with the people who care for your horse. I mean... if your horse is literally not being fed or something, that is one thing... If you doubt the boarding facility's ability to reasonably communicate with you about your horse's well-being so much that you think it is okay to talk to the BO or BM in a condescending, demanding or otherwise aggressive tone, then you should probably just put in your thirty days notice (or whatever your contract requires), quietly deal with whatever you don't like and leave when your thirty days is up (or after you've paid the difference). We like to know that our boarders understand reasonable communication is a must, up front... along with everything else spelled out in their boarding contract.
     
    12-20-2011, 04:05 PM
  #20
Yearling
I'm not a barn owner, nor a boarder, i've been lucky and always had a place for my own. But, I would think if it were my barn. I would tell the owner their horse is starving, either feed it like it should be fed, or animal control will be called and they will follow the horse's progress.
     

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