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Building Weight (topline) & Omolene feed

This is a discussion on Building Weight (topline) & Omolene feed within the Horse Nutrition forums, part of the Horse Health category

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        02-13-2014, 12:27 AM
      #11
    Trained
    I like Omolene, it is great if the horse is being worked. My "go to" for weight gain is senior feed.

    Just my .02 on alfalfa. If you buy alfalfa bales, not pellets - given that your main goal is "weight gain", be picky. If it is stemmy you aren't going to get as much "bang for your buck". On the other hand, alfalfa pellets are fortified, and there is no waste.
         
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        02-21-2014, 03:07 PM
      #12
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BadWolf    
    I've been working on building weight on my 6 year old TWH gelding.
    His topline looks awful; belly and ribs look good; neck is ok.

    Lately, I've been feeding him 4c of generic 12% sweet feed mixed with 4c of Purina Omolene 200, with the base dose of Dumor Weight Builder (from Tractor Supply) with it. He gets that once daily.
    He also gets what grass is left that he wants to pick at (2.5-3 acre pasture), and free-choice hay from round bales. They're just plain mixed grass hay. Nothing special, but good enough.

    He is not currently being ridden or worked at all, and he is pasture kept with free access to shelter. Until his weight is back up, whatever exercise he gets is of his own choice.

    He looks like he has gained a little since I added the weight builder about a month ago, but I'm not sure how quickly he should be gaining with it. (I'm new to needing supplements.)

    My question is, do you all think it would be reasonable to sub out the Omolene 200 for their 300 formula for the added vitamins, just over the winter? Or maybe just for 1 bag's worth, for a little extra boost?
    I know it's specified for mares and foals, but the content analysis on the bags looked pretty similar on protein, fat, etc.

    He does fine on pasture alone when the grass is growing, but I've struggled with him this winter. I only got him last year, when winter was mostly over, so this is really my first winter with him. I'm still learning what he needs.

    *Dewormer is UTD, Dentist appointment is scheduled

    Have you looked at purina ultium performance? My vet actually "prescribed" it after my horse had surgery. My horse is extremely hard to keep weight. It has something like 12.5% fat and close to 20% fiber. I can't remember what the protein is, as I don't feed based on protein and barely pay attention to it. It's fully balanced, so no need for vitamin/mineral supplements...just fresh water, hay and salt.

    You're not supposed to have to feed anything extra with the ultium, so I did drop the beet pulp...but once I did that, his top line dwindled down and his belly got big (he's utd on worming). I plan to start adding beet pulp again.

    I did feed omolene 200...and I had to feed a lot of it for my horse. He's 17 hands and his healthy weight is right around 1300#. In order to get him enough calories, I was feeding 12lb per day, split into 3 meals, plus beet pulp.

    Hope this helps some.
         
        02-21-2014, 08:43 PM
      #13
    Weanling
    Actually, when I went to the feed store, they were sold out of what I thought I wanted, and the staff recommended Ultium.
    I'm starting him on that as soon as he finishes the bag he's got now.
    I read the info on the bag, and I think it should be just what he needs.

    I don't know anything about beet pulp, but I do see it mentioned a lot.
    I'll have to do some checking into that in case he's like yours on his top line.
    AFull99 likes this.
         
        02-23-2014, 03:47 AM
      #14
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BadWolf    
    Actually, when I went to the feed store, they were sold out of what I thought I wanted, and the staff recommended Ultium.
    I'm starting him on that as soon as he finishes the bag he's got now.
    I read the info on the bag, and I think it should be just what he needs.

    I don't know anything about beet pulp, but I do see it mentioned a lot.
    I'll have to do some checking into that in case he's like yours on his top line.

    When you get the beet pulp, just make sure it does not have molasses. That added sugar may hype up your horse. When I get my beet pulp, I like shreds. I add enough hot water to cover it, and let it soak until all the water is absorbed. To make sure there's enough water, just grab a handful and squeeze. There should be a good amount of water in the beet pulp. If it's crunchy, add a bit more hot water. By the time all the water is properly absorbed, the water will be warm, not hot...and I find that my horses like it better than when it's cold.

    The ultium is pelleted. I suggest soaking that, as well, to avoid choke. But if you are going to feed beet pulp, you can soak the feed and beet pulp together.

    Best of luck!!
         
        02-23-2014, 10:52 PM
      #15
    Weanling
    I'll definitely consider the beet pulp, depending on how the dental check goes.
    The dentist is supposed to be here Tuesday, or Monday depending on how exactly her other patients go. He may not need it, but if he does, then it looks like a good option.

    I've never been advised to soak feed before. I've seen about a 50/50 split of people who do it and people who don't, and I've read a ton of info about feeding dry vs. soaked. The one thing I haven't really seen are the "cons" of soaking feed. Anyone know of any downsides to soaking feed?
    AFull99 likes this.
         
        02-23-2014, 11:09 PM
      #16
    Foal
    No downsides of soaking feed that I know of. Beet pulp (either pellets or shreds) should be soaked regardless to prevent choke. I prefer to soak any forage pellets to decrease the risk of the horse choking. IMO, beet pulp pellets are the better deal in the long run. You get much more in a bag of pellets than you do shreds. One bag of BP pellets lasts about 2-3x's longer than the shreds. We had an older mare (30+ yrs old) that we fed a soaked alfalfa pellet/beet pulp pellet mix. It helped her gain weight and keep her weight up through the winter.

    As far as other complete feeds go, when you are trying to put weight on a horse the protein content is not what you need to be looking for. A higher protein content will just make your horse hotter. A higher fat content is what you need to be looking for to put weight on a horse. Senior feed is pretty good for putting weight on a horse without making them hot.

    Other than that, plenty of free-choice quality grass hay (especially in the winter) will help with putting on weight.
    AFull99 likes this.
         
        02-24-2014, 02:57 AM
      #17
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SayiWont    
    No downsides of soaking feed that I know of. Beet pulp (either pellets or shreds) should be soaked regardless to prevent choke. I prefer to soak any forage pellets to decrease the risk of the horse choking. IMO, beet pulp pellets are the better deal in the long run. You get much more in a bag of pellets than you do shreds. One bag of BP pellets lasts about 2-3x's longer than the shreds. We had an older mare (30+ yrs old) that we fed a soaked alfalfa pellet/beet pulp pellet mix. It helped her gain weight and keep her weight up through the winter.

    As far as other complete feeds go, when you are trying to put weight on a horse the protein content is not what you need to be looking for. A higher protein content will just make your horse hotter. A higher fat content is what you need to be looking for to put weight on a horse. Senior feed is pretty good for putting weight on a horse without making them hot.

    Other than that, plenty of free-choice quality grass hay (especially in the winter) will help with putting on weight.
    just like say said...no down sides to soaking feed or beet pulp. It helps to cut down on choke, and during the winter, if your horse isn't a really good drinker, it helps to get added water into them.

    I think beet pulp pellets vs beet pulp shreds are a personal preference. I like the convenience of the shreds. The shreds don't take as long to soak. Shreds take 15 minutes in hot water (its warm by the time you feed) and pellets take longer...i can't remember how much longer because I haven't fed them in so long. But beet pulp pellets do make a better purchase, economically speaking. But which ever way you go, you should avoid molasses. Molasses can (and does) make some horses hot...and if your horse is one of those who gets hot from molasses, it will make your job that much harder.

    Yes, you want to avoid feeding higher protein, while trying to rebuild weight. High fat/high fiber is best, along with free fed, good quality hay. The purina senior is good for fat and fiber, but ultium surpasses it with much higher fat and fiber. That said, you will pay about $3 more (give or take) for the ultium. But you will feed a bit less of the ultium vs the senior, so to me it works out.

    When I start a new feed, and I have beet pulp, I like to feed a lower amount of the beet pulp, until I can see how the horse reacts. I have to say, thankfully, no matter what purina feed that I have fed, my horses (arabs and part arab) have never gotten hot, crazy, strung out, etc, while on purina feeds. I have fed other feeds, and they were pretty wound up. When I know how the feed is working, behavior wise, I will watch for body changes. Dropped weight, etc. and adjust my beet pulp from there. But I always start out on 2 or 3 large handfuls (double handed handfuls), of shreds and go from there.

    I do know that some people say that they will not feed beet pulp, in any form, because beet pulp can cause blockages. I guess it could happen. I had a horse who had a bladder stone. Anything is possible! So if you worry about blockage, you can add a cup of oil to the dry beet pulp. When it's completely absorbed, then you can add water to soak. The oil helps to "lube" things up and keep thing moving.
         
        02-24-2014, 03:02 AM
      #18
    Foal
    Here's a couple of links for purina senior and for the ultium, to help you see the differences, and help you make the best decision for your horse and your wallet.

    Purina Horse Feeds - EQUINE FAMILY

    Purina Horse Feeds - ULTIUM

    Like I said before, my vet had me put my horse on it, after his surgery. I now have all 3 of my horses on it, and i'm happy with the benefits...except that my one horse has lost his topline when I stopped the beet pulp. He will be going back on it. But I can see a great difference on hoof and hair condition. They are seemingly more happy and settled, since being on the ultium, as well. But again, ultium runs about $3 more than senior, and I don't have to feed as much of the ultuim as I did the senior.

    When you look at the links, be sure to pay special attention to fat and fiber on both feeds.

    Really hope this helps!
    BadWolf likes this.
         

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