Cracked Corn - Page 11
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health > Horse Nutrition

Cracked Corn

This is a discussion on Cracked Corn within the Horse Nutrition forums, part of the Horse Health category

    Like Tree76Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        02-23-2014, 10:57 PM
      #101
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by amigoboy    
    I donīt know about your father or grandfather or their horses or where you get your information but it has been discussed before somewhere:
    The military horse was in service until 20 years of age then mustered out and auktioned off to the civilian market, many bought up by the forestry dept. Here in Sweden by riding schools, these horses lived till long over 30yrs.
    Colic and founder was not all that common that I know of and IR was not even heard of (IR is whatīs called a Welfare Sickness that can be due to poor breeding - over feeding/under worked or a combination of both).
    There were good horsemen and there were poor horsemen;
    Not to be mean:
    But for someone to say that the horse knowlage was limited back when horses were a part of everyday life leaves me to wonder about that person own horse knowlage.
    Such a statement too me sounds so juvenial:
    "MOM AND DAD ARE SOOOOO OUT OF IT, THEY HAVENīT GOTTA CLUE.....MAN.....WHY CAINīT THEY STAY ON THE FARM!"
    Every kid thinks they know more than mom and dad.....untill they have to fend for themselfs......then they wished theyīd listen a little more too what they said.
    If past generations didnīt have some talent they would have starved and we would not be here.
    Think about that
    Sweden had the luxury of not having a mounted, campaigning Cav since the war with Napoleon (and even then it was about 3,500 strong....even during Sweden's military heyday...that 100+ year period starting with their brilliant warrior king Gustav II, who reorganized the army into a true "Swedish" army, despite very small numbers, creating a military that would be a driving force in Europe for 100 years, would have changed the History of Europe had he lived....still didn't have over 3,500 in Cav, even when it was campaigning, but that's a different history lesson). For Cav that had to campaign, even at home (like the US and Canada where they had so much land to cover) a Cav horse that saw 20 was pretty rare. Those that did were the ones who remained at stationary garrisons, etc.... where life was far less demanding and they didn't have to hold up rigors of a campaign lifestyle.

    IR is not a breeding issue. Horses with no family history of it, at a good weight and sound can become IR. Diet can (and does) play a huge part. It's a bit like saying the high cholesterol is the result of human breeding and not diet.

    As for old timers and what they knew. My grandfather knew that grain was (as he put it) hot feed. Corn was the hottest. He didn't know why. His father didn't know why, but they knew that it was and it needed to be avoided. Heaven help me if I was caught feeding our horses the diet you listed. I'd have gotten beat. Today I can graze year round, because I don't have the stock to feed that they did. There was a reason they had massive hay sheds at different fields and even barns just for hay, because they had to have feed for them and that meant having enough hay for them all (plus some excess just in case). While they didn't understand that there can also be issues with hay, they knew that grain was not good (and could be avoided), even if they didn't know why. (of course we didn't go on campaign with our horses, but who does anymore). But then they also knew that shoeing a horse was not good for it too. Now these were old timers. Born in the 1800's. For whatever reason they understood that just because something was a common practice did not make it a good thing. How they gained the knowledge I'll never know. At some point it was likely a case of seeing problems with some and not with others and sorting it out, but by the time my grandfather came along it was well know in the family. My grandfather was quite willing to say that the vet didn't know what he was talking about if it was something he knew to not be true (the vet kept insisting that my mare, with her white feet, needed to be shod or her feet would be ruined). In my case my mentors were knowledgeable, but I would not have called them enlightened since what they knew was not new to them. They would have said that a farmer should get more hay and not feed grain. They would have said "You don't have a clue about horses", but they'd have been glad to explain it to you. Their explanations were pretty simple. Grains = hot and hot is not good. No real knowledge as to why, but modern equine studies have given me a lot of respect for what they somehow knew. Of course I'm not saying I believed it all as a teenager (when I knew plenty of people who feed oats....even corn), but I knew better than to not follow their rules. In retrospect I'm happy that I did.

    As for the survivability of former generations . They survived medieval medicine, but that didn't make it smart . Just means that if you were strong enough, lucky enough not to get sick, lucky enough not to get injured you a better chance of surviving. Today a man wounded in battle has better than a 95% chance of surviving if he reaches a hospital in time. 200 years ago most wounded men had a better chance if they didn't end up in a hospital . Horses surviving what humans do to them is a tribute to their ability to endure and survive "in spite of" what we do. It's hardly a measure of what are the right things to do.
    Man didn't starve out because we'll turn just about anything into food . We domesticated animals to make it easier to do that. So long as they lived long enough to continue reproducing it didn't matter if their digestive system was working correctly. So long as it met human needs then it was all good. Seems some things haven't changed in 4,000 years
    loosie, smrobs, jaydee and 1 others like this.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        02-24-2014, 12:21 AM
      #102
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by amigoboy    
    I donīt know about your father or grandfather or their horses or where you get your information but it has been discussed before somewhere:
    The military horse was in service until 20 years of age then mustered out and auktioned off to the civilian market, many bought up by the forestry dept. Here in Sweden by riding schools, these horses lived till long over 30yrs.

    Really? I'd like to see some proof that horses living to 30+ years was common back in those days..


    Colic and founder was not all that common that I know of and IR was not even heard of (IR is whatīs called a Welfare Sickness that can be due to poor breeding - over feeding/under worked or a combination of both).
    There were good horsemen and there were poor horsemen;

    Wow, you were alive back in those days and were present to monitor the health of each horse to watch for signs of laminitis and/or colic? That would make you, what, 90 years old?

    The reason IR wasn't heard of is because the knowledge of horse health was limited. All they really knew back then was when a horse was a "poor doer". If that was the case, then they would up the grain intake and often actually make the horse worse. When the horse couldn't hold up to the work needing done, it was disposed of and a different, healthier horse was brought in.


    Not to be mean:
    But for someone to say that the horse knowlage was limited back when horses were a part of everyday life leaves me to wonder about that person own horse knowlage.
    Such a statement too me sounds so juvenial:
    "MOM AND DAD ARE SOOOOO OUT OF IT, THEY HAVENīT GOTTA CLUE.....MAN.....WHY CAINīT THEY STAY ON THE FARM!"
    Every kid thinks they know more than mom and dad.....untill they have to fend for themselfs......then they wished theyīd listen a little more too what they said.

    Wow, just wow. Who, exactly is supposedly "juvenile" (by the way, that's the correct spelling)? You know for a fact that you're older than me? You know for a fact that you've got more/better horse experience? As for "knowing more than mom and dad", sometimes that's true. There are a few things that I know that my Dad doesn't, simply because I had the opportunity to seek out the information. He didn't grow up in the computer age where the internet was a readily accessible point of information/knowledge. However, for every 1 thing I know that he doesn't, there are about a million things he knows that I don't.

    The reason that I know what I do about horse health is because I read current equine medical studies and I keep track of the medical advancements and publications. I don't depend on 80 year old information to be current and accurate.

    If you think the entire medical field was better back then, then I assume you don't take flu shots or take any sort of penicillin derivative or have MRI's done or ultrasounds. I assume that you were born in your mother's house instead of a hospital and that there was a midwife present instead of a doctor?

    See how inaccurate "assumptions" can be?


    If past generations didnīt have some talent they would have starved and we would not be here.
    Think about that
    Wow, just so much mis-information and so many assumptions in your post. I would almost want to feel offended if it wasn't quite so laughable.

    Yes, knowledge of "horse health and anatomy" was very limited back in those days, regardless of what you believe. Even knowledge of human anatomy and body functions were very limited. The technology that allows us to actually study how a horse's (or human's) digestive processes work and how their body metabolizes certain things like sugars and starches is very new in the grand scheme of things. Most of the tech advancements that allow these things and many others have all been invented/discovered in the last 100 years or so. Back in the days that you are so set on, any tech available would have been rudimentary at best.

    Anyway, I'm done responding to you. You can feed your horses whatever you wish, but I seriously doubt you are going to convince anyone to agree with you when all your information is based on what the cavalry did almost 100 years ago.

    Does kind of make you wonder why they needed so many re-mounts even when they weren't at war....
    loosie and jaydee like this.
         

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


    Old Thread Warning
    This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Corn Missy May General Off Topic Discussion 2 07-30-2012 10:22 PM
    Corn Cobs??? shaggy Horse Talk 11 07-23-2012 07:08 PM
    corn stalks eclipseranch Horse Nutrition 5 07-10-2012 10:09 PM
    Corn Oil? JustDoIt Horse Nutrition 13 06-04-2011 04:21 AM
    corn oil KANSAS_TWISTER Horse Health 4 06-05-2008 08:12 AM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:39 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0