Diets for a hard keeper? - Page 2
 
 

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Diets for a hard keeper?

This is a discussion on Diets for a hard keeper? within the Horse Nutrition forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Hard keeper horse
  • When should you see a difference when giving a horse hard keeper

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    08-16-2012, 06:28 PM
  #11
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by verona1016    
When I bought my horse, the seller told me that he "might" crib "a little."
That's like Real Estate Agent speaking of a 'gently sloping block'!!
     
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    08-16-2012, 09:06 PM
  #12
Yearling
Thanks for all the advice guys! I really am not in a rush to buy a horse, so if it turns out that this isn't meant to be, which likely will be the case considering what I've read here.. then there will be plenty of time to find the right horse. If only I could convince my dad to travel a teensy bit farther! I seem to live in the land of 14hh QH geldings who are trained western and simply ridden around backyards. :P
     
    08-17-2012, 11:41 AM
  #13
Green Broke
Glad to hear first hand positive results from Succeed I've lucked out in my timing, since SmartPak is offering 50% off the first 2 months of SmartPaks at the moment, so I should at least be able to see if it makes a difference before paying full price!

The ridiculous price for the omeprazole is for "name brand" UlcerGard/GastroGard. Did your vet manage to get you a generic version? If so, I'd be very appreciative if you still have the company/product name handy and could PM it to me!
     
    08-17-2012, 08:14 PM
  #14
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by verona1016    
Did your vet manage to get you a generic version? If so, I'd be very appreciative if you still have the company/product name handy and could PM it to me!
Good question and I don't have answer

Every time I buy it, either from the vet or the local veterinarian pharmacy, it's a liquid in one of their own bottles with their own prescription/dosage sticker on it.

It very well could be they buy a generic liquid in bulk. I know it's banana flavored; my Arab would drink the whole 30 days at once, given half the chance; it works; and after reading your post, I am shutting up about $150 for 30 days - lol lol lol
     
    08-18-2012, 02:53 AM
  #15
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk    
Good question and I don't have answer

Every time I buy it, either from the vet or the local veterinarian pharmacy, it's a liquid in one of their own bottles with their own prescription/dosage sticker on it.

It very well could be they buy a generic liquid in bulk. I know it's banana flavored; my Arab would drink the whole 30 days at once, given half the chance; it works; and after reading your post, I am shutting up about $150 for 30 days - lol lol lol
I'll have to ask my vet about that!
     
    08-19-2012, 07:09 PM
  #16
Foal
Jore: A cribbing horse with a collar is only as good as the collar and the amount of work he gets. The advice above they are giving you a very good except I do have to take issue with the comment on Equiotic. This Equine Bacteria Technology was tested on hundreds of horses and the only way it could possibly cause colic is if the packets or paste was left in the heat and spoiled. It says on the packaging to keep cool. I keep it in a refrigerator.
If the hind gut is compromised, you need what was in it in the first place. Namely equine bacteria that is the sub-strain from the horse. That is Equiotic with it's Lactobacillus reuteri. The big difference between this product and the super laxative/probiotics that you see on the market is that because Equiotic is made from actual equine bacteria it is actually reactive with the creation and growth of reuteri/metabolite which kill pathogens and stimulate the receptors in the mucosa. While walkinthewalk is obviously an experienced and more than responsible horseman, I would take a guess that his vet did not tell him to put the Equiotic in the fridge. If I am wrong, I would love to know it and I do not doubt his word in that he only wants what is good for your or his horse but, I use a TON of this product and know what it does. It went to London with the USEF Eventing team and is at the World Championship Endurance Championships on every single horse on the USEF team.

If it is a good horse and you can put up with the cribbing and will give the horse a ton of work, it could be worth it. I have been around world class Jumpers and Dressage horses that were cribbers. As with most horses, it is a matter of management no matter what.
     
    08-20-2012, 09:20 AM
  #17
Yearling
Thanks for all the information! This horse is still green (although she has nice transitions, back ups, etc) because she was used as a broodmare after retiring from the track.. but is now being brought back into work after the thumbs up from the vet, she's had sixty days on. She's incredibly athletic and is starting jumping lessons this week.

As for diet, she's currently getting 8 quartz of grain per day ($110 per month) but that's on limited turnout because of bugs and lack of grass. At my barn, she'd get 24/7 turnout and just be brought in for meals and if the weather is bad.

I read that grass and alfalfa hay is better for horses that tend to have ulcers anyways so I think that'd be a much better route for her. I also read about soaked alfalfa cubes so those are also something to look into.

I'd love to get her and take her on as a "permanent project" because I think she does have the potential to be a really nice horse. Plus she's super sweet. I'm taking my time and doing my research though, on everything from potential diets to the cribbing issue.
     
    08-20-2012, 10:17 AM
  #18
Foal
You need to pay attention to the feed. At the track she most likely had high starch and high stress. The intial turn out is great but I really would suggest, changing to a high fat feed, nothing higher than 14% carbs and absolutely NO corn whatsoever. No corn oil, no corn nor by-products.
High fat will keep the PH healthy in the hind gut and will help with blood sugar levels. If you do not pay attention to the feed, everything else hardly matters, including many supplements. But, with the cribbing and the potential of a compromised hindgut, this is the way I would go. Uckele.com has a great source of healthy fat called "Coca-Soya". This would help as well.
     
    08-20-2012, 10:43 AM
  #19
Yearling
Thanks for the tips! I'll look into that. She'll already need joint supplements (as a flexion test revealed a bit of soreness in her right front fetlock), but she's quite healthy and sound otherwise.

She also apparently gets a bit of thrush.. which is another thing I'm hesitant about. The seller was treating it and such but I'm not too educated on it.
     
    08-20-2012, 11:10 AM
  #20
Foal
Inflammation is the number one thing to take care of before you buy a supplement. You can try some devils claw but once again if you are feeding high starch it is not helping the situation any. You want to look at the Omega's but, if the horse is out on pasture and it is a healthy pasture this will help. In the way of supplements, there are a few very good ways to go but, you have to know if you are going to go to USEF shows, which will drug test. Devils claw while being very good, is considered a masking agent so, you could not use anything with that. I would x-ray the joint as well before moving ahead. She/he could have a chip. They can be usually removed but it would cost you a few. Funny things about chips, they don't always mean anything. I had a GP school master years ago that had two and never went off nor sore. I have had the opposite though as well.
     

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