Emaciated rescue horse. What to feed? - Page 2
 
 

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Emaciated rescue horse. What to feed?

This is a discussion on Emaciated rescue horse. What to feed? within the Horse Nutrition forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Feeding an emaciated horse
  • What to feed a rescued yearling colt

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    07-03-2012, 09:52 AM
  #11
dee
Started
Oh darlin', have you got your work cut out for you! Glad to hear that you are separating them ASAP, hopefully, momma isn't already pregnant (not your fault and I'm not even thinking that way). There is an extra reason for separating mother and son. If she only scores a 1 or 1.5, and he scores a 4.5, there is something seriously off here. He may be a feed hog and not letting her eat all she needs. When you throw your bale of hay out in the morning, you might want to make several piles of it, so that when the colt runs her off of one pile she can simply move to another pile. It's more work, but it will at least give mom a chance to get her fair share before baby snarfs it up.
     
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    07-03-2012, 12:24 PM
  #12
Foal
I don't have a working camera at the moment but I found a picture of a horse that is in about the same body condition. I'm going to try and post it so you have an idea...



This is about what she looks like, she is a bit thinner in the spine area.

The colt (Jack) is doing great! He's is easy to catch and halter, we are working on leading because after I catch him he wants to just stand there. I can pick up and clean all four feet even though he was convinced he couldn't stand on three legs! I can touch him all over and play with his ears. He seems to have a lot of potential he's very calm and seems to be trying to learn. I haven't noticed him hogging the hay, mostly he just stands next to Callie and they eat for a couple hours, then he goes and wanders around the pen for a bit and then comes back to stand by her. I do throw the hay out into two to three piles anyway but they seem to like eating together.
Another thing I noticed when I was checking him over, I think he might be a crypt, I only felt one testicle.
     
    07-03-2012, 12:28 PM
  #13
Showing
Just be careful about him being in the same area as her.. youngings still can breed and that would not be good at all for Callie.
     
    07-03-2012, 01:29 PM
  #14
Foal
I plan on having them seperated by the weekend at the very latest. I hope she isn't pregenant, I know I can't afford three horses long term and seling an unpapered foal is very hard in my area.
     
    07-04-2012, 08:21 AM
  #15
Foal
If the mare is gaining weight on 24/7 hay and the feed you are giving her, I wouldn't do anything else other than your bi-monthly worming. If she is gaining weight than you must be doing something right! I took in a rescue horse a year or so ago that wouldn't gain any weight on 24/7 hay and 10lb of feed (5 in the morning and 5 at night) so I started adding funflower oil in her feed. I started with 1/2 a cup and worked up to 1 cup. She went from a 2 to a 3 in a single month! I know oil is very high in omega 6 and isn't very good for horses but I ran out of options. Nothing the vet. Gave her worked... Something for you to keep in mind if she won't gain weight... I have heard that a cup of beet pulp works really well as well but you can't get that stuff where I'm from. Please beware that oil will make her HOT, and I mean HOT, but it's o.k. If you don't mind riding the rocket! Yeeeehaaa! :-D
     
    07-04-2012, 08:33 AM
  #16
Foal
I'd like to throw in a word about the colt/mom mating crisis that everyone is so worried about... I keep my horses in a 6 acre paddock, 3 mares and a stallion make up the breeding band. I also have colts and fillies in the same paddock with the band and not once has a colt been able to cover his mom or nor has the stallion covered his fillies. Nature doesn't work that way. Fillies and colts are driven out of the breeding band once they come of age. Now if your colt and mare are alone things may be different, I don't know. But chances are the mare will kick her sons but if he tries to mount her, unless she becomes really desparate with no stallions around! LOL
     
    07-04-2012, 08:51 AM
  #17
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by tozel    
I'd like to throw in a word about the colt/mom mating crisis that everyone is so worried about... I keep my horses in a 6 acre paddock, 3 mares and a stallion make up the breeding band. I also have colts and fillies in the same paddock with the band and not once has a colt been able to cover his mom or nor has the stallion covered his fillies. Nature doesn't work that way. Fillies and colts are driven out of the breeding band once they come of age. Now if your colt and mare are alone things may be different, I don't know. But chances are the mare will kick her sons but if he tries to mount her, unless she becomes really desparate with no stallions around! LOL
In the wild colts are pushed out of the band. Fillies stay unless stolen by another stallion.

In your herd on 6 acres the stallion is probably keeping the colts away but colts of age will breed to their dams or sisters if given the chance. A stallion will certainly breed his daughter. Horses don't know about things like incest & Nature doesn't care either. It's called inbreeding & it does happen in the wild too.
     
    07-04-2012, 09:04 AM
  #18
Foal
I'm really sorry about the msg bombardment, I should have read everything before I sent of the initial message... Anyway, don't jump to conclusions that the colt is a crypt. I currently have a 2 year old colt that magically looses one testicle every now and then. Even a vet. Would insist that he is a crypt. When he is relaxed and standing still you can see and feel 2 fully developed testicles, let him gallop with mom for a few minutes and the right testicle somehow disappears! Watch him closely every day and you just might see that second testicle.
     
    07-04-2012, 10:07 AM
  #19
Foal
Natisha, I do agree with you that colts and fillies will breed with each other, but remember, they are only half brothers and sisters since their mothers are not the same. As for a stallion breeding his own filly, I have a really hard time believing that because fillies are also kicked out of the breeding band. The only reason you don't see groups of bachelor fillies is because they are taken by other band stallions immediately. The only way a stallion will breed his own daughter is if he unknowingly steels her from another band stallion. So on the contrary to what you stated, nature does prevent incest. Otherwise we would have zero genetic diversity in the wild and horses would probably not be able to survive. Please remember that horses are very capable of surviving without us humans babying them around.
     
    07-04-2012, 11:54 AM
  #20
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by tozel    
natisha, I do agree with you that colts and fillies will breed with each other, but remember, they are only half brothers and sisters since their mothers are not the same. As for a stallion breeding his own filly, I have a really hard time believing that because fillies are also kicked out of the breeding band. The only reason you don't see groups of bachelor fillies is because they are taken by other band stallions immediately. The only way a stallion will breed his own daughter is if he unknowingly steels her from another band stallion. So on the contrary to what you stated, nature does prevent incest. Otherwise we would have zero genetic diversity in the wild and horses would probably not be able to survive. Please remember that horses are very capable of surviving without us humans babying them around.
I stand corrected. I never heard of the girls getting kicked out but it seems the sometimes do too. Thanks for the information.
     

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