Which feed is best?
   

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Which feed is best?

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    03-31-2011, 07:42 PM
  #1
Foal
Question Which feed is best?

Soon I will be moving my horse onto my own property. At the boarding stable she was fed Safe Choice out of convenience for the owner, who fed all of the other horses the same feed. I have been told that Safe Choice is high in fat and things horse's don't need in their systems, and I want to switch feeds. Which one would be best? She is a 9 year old QH mare.
     
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    04-01-2011, 09:51 AM
  #2
Started
First off, how does she look on her current diet? What would you change about her current condition? Before you change things up, what's her hay and pasture situation going to be? SC has 7% fat. Low in my book. I try for 10-12% or about 1/3# per horse. Fat is very beneficial to horses. They can't colic or founder on it, it provides concentrated calories without sugars, it improves coat and skin condition, it can be used as a sustained energy source, it's inexpensive... Some people throw out that horses can't use fat because they don't have a gall bladder. They don't need a gall bladder to digest it. As far as it having things horses don't need, please elaborate. Everything in it is usable by the horse. Does she even need grain/concentrates? Maybe not. If she only gets lightly worked, than she might do well on just hay and a loose vitamin/mineral supplement. If you're working her hard than she will need additional calories to make up what she physically can't eat.
     
    04-01-2011, 09:54 AM
  #3
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by hpbelle    
Soon I will be moving my horse onto my own property. At the boarding stable she was fed Safe Choice out of convenience for the owner, who fed all of the other horses the same feed. I have been told that Safe Choice is high in fat and things horse's don't need in their systems, and I want to switch feeds. Which one would be best? She is a 9 year old QH mare.
Another vote that SafeChoice is not high in fat. 7% is not high.

I know there is a crowd that hates Safechoice because they hate its name but really, if your horse is doing fine on it, why change?

It is not a bad feed.
     
    04-03-2011, 10:22 AM
  #4
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Left Hand Percherons    
First off, how does she look on her current diet? What would you change about her current condition? Before you change things up, what's her hay and pasture situation going to be? SC has 7% fat. Low in my book. I try for 10-12% or about 1/3# per horse. Fat is very beneficial to horses. They can't colic or founder on it, it provides concentrated calories without sugars, it improves coat and skin condition, it can be used as a sustained energy source, it's inexpensive... Some people throw out that horses can't use fat because they don't have a gall bladder. They don't need a gall bladder to digest it. As far as it having things horses don't need, please elaborate. Everything in it is usable by the horse. Does she even need grain/concentrates? Maybe not. If she only gets lightly worked, than she might do well on just hay and a loose vitamin/mineral supplement. If you're working her hard than she will need additional calories to make up what she physically can't eat.
She is doing great on her current diet, actually. However, she is fed a little less than the other horses because she gains weight on the feed easily, if that makes a difference. I am hoping to have her out on grass for most of the day and in a stall during the night, but it's not for sure. About changing her current condition, I don't really have a specific thing I want to change, but I just want the healthiest feed possible for her. I do not know much about the other things horses don't need, but everyone I have talked to does not recommend feeding SC. She has always had grain, and I don't know if I would take her off of it. She is worked for about 30 minutes to an hour 4 or 5 times a week, but mostly whenever I have the time to ride. Thank you!
     
    04-03-2011, 12:52 PM
  #5
Started
If she looks good on her current diet, that's great it's working. How much of the SC is she getting? If she's chubby on less than 3# a day, than you probably should eliminate it for just a loose vitamin/mineral product. I would wait until you get her home and reevaluate her condition. If she's going to be by herself, she might loose weight just from the stress of no companionship. You're also headed into some dreadful heat that can be very taxing to most horses. You might have trouble keeping her weight up when it's in the 90-100s. Most in the south will put horses out at night and keep them up during the day just for that reason. If you're only feeding one horse, you're going to have spoilage problems with traditional grain mixes in the summer. Pelleted products with a lower moisture content like the SC are going to hold up better.

SC is one of those products that people either love or hate. Have you asked your BO why she uses it and what she likes about it? There's more to it than just having one product for the entire barn.

I would recommend finding a HOW (Purina), TC, Nutrena or other feed manufacturer workshop in your area. Separate out the product indorsements and learn what you can about horse nutrtion. Learn what shortages you hays typically have and how to make up for them.
     
    04-04-2011, 09:55 PM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Left Hand Percherons    
If she looks good on her current diet, that's great it's working. How much of the SC is she getting? If she's chubby on less than 3# a day, than you probably should eliminate it for just a loose vitamin/mineral product. I would wait until you get her home and reevaluate her condition. If she's going to be by herself, she might loose weight just from the stress of no companionship. You're also headed into some dreadful heat that can be very taxing to most horses. You might have trouble keeping her weight up when it's in the 90-100s. Most in the south will put horses out at night and keep them up during the day just for that reason. If you're only feeding one horse, you're going to have spoilage problems with traditional grain mixes in the summer. Pelleted products with a lower moisture content like the SC are going to hold up better.

SC is one of those products that people either love or hate. Have you asked your BO why she uses it and what she likes about it? There's more to it than just having one product for the entire barn.

I would recommend finding a HOW (Purina), TC, Nutrena or other feed manufacturer workshop in your area. Separate out the product indorsements and learn what you can about horse nutrtion. Learn what shortages you hays typically have and how to make up for them.
She gets about 3/4 of the regular scoop size. (Not sure how much that is exactly.) On the new property, there is a horse that will stay behind with us because he is no longer usable by the current owner and needs to slow down. So, she will have companionship and that is not a problem. We are moving her north, so the heat isn't an issue either. Another plus is the horse that will be staying with the property is fed SC already. Thank you for your help!
     
    04-04-2011, 10:01 PM
  #7
Yearling
Triple Crown

30 percent Supplement
Dehulled Soybean Meal, Wheat Middlings, Ground Limestone, Dicalcium Phosphate, Monocalcium Phosphate, Magnesium Oxide, Dried Yeast Fermentation Solubles, Brewers Dried Yeast, Zinc Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Kelp Meal, Yeast Culture, Hydrated Sodium Calcium Aluminosilicate, Anethole, Fenugreek Seed, Lecithin, Iron Proteinate, Magnesium Proteinate, Dried Trichoderma Longibrachiatum Fermentation Extract, Soybean Oil, Calcium Carbonate, Selenium Yeast, Dried Lactobacillus Acidophilus Fermentation Product, Dried Enterococcus Faecium Fermentation Product, Dried Bacillus Subtilis Fermentation Extract, Salt, Vitamin E Supplement, Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C), Niacin Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin A Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Beta Carotene, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Choline Chloride, Menadione Sodium Bisulfite Complex (Source of Vitamin K Activity), Folic Acid, Sodium Bicarbonate, Sodium Sesquicarbonate, Cane Molasses, Calcium Lignin Sulfonate, Rice Bran, Ferrous Sulfate, Manganese Sulfate, Zinc Sulfate, Copper Sulfate, Cobalt Sulfate, Ethylenediamine Dihydriodide, Flaxseed, Monosodium Phosphate, L-Lysine, DL-methionine, (Propionic Acid, Sodium Benzoate, Potassium Sorbate (Preservatives))
-Low starch and sugar
-Supports optimum hoof health.
-Supports growth and maintenance of both bone
and muscle.
-Added source of Omega3 fatty acids which
support a healthy and brilliant looking hair coat.

Progressive

Pro advantage Hi Fat
  • A blend of vegetable oils including flax for enhanced hair-coat condition.
  • Amino acids with added lysine, methionine, tryptophan and threonine for optimum muscle growth.
  • Yeast culture for improvement in gut function and enhanced absorption.
  • Chelated trace minerals for increased mineral absorption.
  • Proven nutrients for improved immune function and metabolism.
-Balanced Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acids for enhanced hair coat and overall appearance
-Extruded (fully cooked) for maximum digestibility
Buckeye
Grow n Win
Dehulled Soybean Meal, Heat Processed Soybeans, Wheat Middlings, Maize Distillers Dried Grains,
Dehydrated Alfalfa Meal, L-Lysine, DL-Methionine, Flax Seed, Vegetable Oil, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Phosphate, Salt,
Potassium Chloride, Potassium Sulfate, Magnesium Sulfate, Magnesium Oxide, Manganous Oxide, Manganese Sulfate, Ferrous
Sulfate, Copper Sulfate, Zinc Sulfate, Polysaccharide Complex of Manganese, Polysaccharide Complex of Iron, Polysaccharide
Complex of Copper, Polysaccharide Complex of Zinc, Cobalt Sulfate, Ethylenediamine Dihydriodide, Calcium Iodate, Selenium
Yeast, Sodium Selenite, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate,
Riboflavin, Niacin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Folic Acid, Biotin, d-Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin B12, Choline Chloride,
Ascorbic Acid, Artificial Flavor.
-Low starch and sugars
-contains flax seed for great coat coat
-only 1.5 pounds needed

I DO NOT OWN THIS I JUST MADE IT FOR PERSONAL USE!!!!!
     
    04-04-2011, 10:04 PM
  #8
Yearling
When I researching Progressive feeds, they didnt provide a list of ingredients but it could just be the sites I looked at.
     
    04-07-2011, 12:59 AM
  #9
Weanling
Hi! I just found this thread while researching grain brands. I understand the fat levels, but have heard even more about sugar content problems. What are commonly added sugary ingredients I can look for in ingredient lists? (I don't want to hijack the thread :( sorry, it just looked like you got good responses)
     
    04-07-2011, 11:09 AM
  #10
Started
Molasses is an obvious added sugar. Most sugars in grain concentrates come from the grains themselves. The principle energy content of forages, grains and grain byproducts is carbohydrates which in simple terms is sugars. Products with oats, corn, barley,wheat midds and grain byproducts will have higher sugars (NSC, non structured carbohydrates) but you will also find them in forage products (alfalfa, BP, soybean hulls...) You're not going to get away from sugars in a horse's diet. Carbohydrates are the principle energy source for horses. Hays are a significant source. Check out safergrass.org to understand the differences in carbs.
     

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best feed, choosing feed, feed, feeding, grain

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