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Help with feeding a hot horse!!

This is a discussion on Help with feeding a hot horse!! within the Horse Nutrition forums, part of the Horse Health category

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        03-04-2013, 12:02 PM
      #11
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Carolineeeee    
    I will look into a slowfeeder because she tends to scarf down her food rather quickly
    Ditto the slow feeder but that "scarf down her food rather quickly", if that means hay, she may have a tendency toward insulin issues, even if she has lost weight. While the mental image of a metabolic horse is always that of a fat horse, one of my metabolic horses is now a hard keeper and would look like a refugee from a slaughter auction if I didn't fill him full of rice bran

    Or, as has been mentioned, she may be scarfing her hay down because she's been too many hours with nothing to eat --- slow feeder nets solve that. The ones I buy will hold about 12 pounds of hay which is about half of an average sized horse's daily forage requirement.

    Arabs are on that awful thing called "Predisposed List"

    That being said, no corn oil, no vegetable oil. They don't have a balance of Omega -3's to -6's. They are very high in Omega-6 which is established to exacerbate any type of inflammation.

    This link talks about the high amount of Omega-6 in cooking oils.
    Healthy Cooking Oils

    Where it says in part:
    Quote:
    Omega 6 oils are found abundantly in corn, soy, canola, sunflower, safflower and other commercially used cooking oils. The problem is that people are consuming too much of these oils, thus throwing off their omega 3 to omega 6 ratio. The proper balance is fats in a body is important, as if our fat balance is off, cell membranes and other cellular processes do not function quite as well. People today eat way too much omega 6 oils. The ideal ratio of omega 3 to omega 6 is about 1:4.
    Even though humans are referenced the same principle applies to horses; although I THINK the "understood" ratio (I don't think there has been a formal study yet) is more like 1:3 for horses but I may need corrected on that.

    Rice Bran OIL might be the safest if you don't want to add rice bran meal or pellets; although oil can get really sloppy and has to be used quickly, once the seal is broke.

    This link may help

    http://gettyequinenutrition.biz/Library/FatisFat.htm

    Where it says in part:
    Quote:
    Balance your oils

    To feed flaxseed meal or Chia seeds, it is best to limit the amount fed to no more than 1/2 cup per 400 lbs of body weight (120 ml per 180 kg of body weight). The dosage for flaxseed oil should be 1.5 tablespoons per 400 lbs of body weight (22.5 ml per 180 kg body weight).

    When feeding oils that are high in omega 6s, such as soybean, corn, and wheat germ oils, they should not exceed the amount of omega 3 sources. Even though soybean oil has about 7% omega 3s, the vast majority of its content is from omega 6s. And, if your horse requires more fat than these can offer, you can safely add rice bran oil (high in omega 9s). Finally, it’s best to avoid coconut oil and animal fat. These contain too much saturated fat and horses are just not designed to handle these feed sources.

    Not all equines are the same
    Depending on the health status, exercise level, and condition of your horse, supplementation of fat may be beneficial. But other equines such as ponies, minis, donkeys, and mules cannot tolerate the high levels horses can. They require some fat, but generally 1/3 to 1/2 the amount given to horses.

    More I hope this helps - lol lol
    Carolineeeee likes this.
         
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        03-04-2013, 12:10 PM
      #12
    Yearling
    If you're looking for a non hot feed with low NSC that will put weight on them. Beet pulp (easily digestable fiber, high Ca but little to no P) and copra (easily digestable, high P with low Ca). Soak them and just feed them together. Mine will lick their feeders clean of it. You will want to check other minerals too, (make sure you balance more than just the Ca to P ratio) but they will put weight on a horse. Especially if it's not being worked enough.
    Oils work well too (easily digestable energy source), just don't give too much.

    Important note: make any changes to their diet gradual. Sudden changes can create bigger problems.
    Carolineeeee likes this.
         
        03-04-2013, 12:12 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
    How many hours is she going without roughage. Keep in mind that the faster a horse takes in feed, the faster it comes out. It is very unhealthy for a horse to consume all it's feed befor noon and have nothing until 5 or 6. The gut isn't designed for that type of schedule and a horse can develop ulcers.
    her first feeding is about 6:30 Am and the second feeding is around 3:30 PM.
         
        03-04-2013, 12:19 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Thanks everyone for all of the advice! I don't want to change too much at once so I think my plan will be to start gradually switching from alf/bermuda pellets to timothy pellets and also put some grass hay in a slow feeder in her stall.

    One more question!, if she has a slow feeder with grass hay should she still be fed twice per day?
         
        03-04-2013, 01:01 PM
      #15
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
    How many hours is she going without roughage. Keep in mind that the faster a horse takes in feed, the faster it comes out. It is very unhealthy for a horse to consume all it's feed befor noon and have nothing until 5 or 6. The gut isn't designed for that type of schedule and a horse can develop ulcers.
    ^^^THAT!!
    Ulcers can make your horse moody, hot, mare-ish, sour.
         
        03-04-2013, 01:05 PM
      #16
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Carolineeeee    
    Thanks everyone for all of the advice! I don't want to change too much at once so I think my plan will be to start gradually switching from alf/bermuda pellets to timothy pellets and also put some grass hay in a slow feeder in her stall.

    One more question!, if she has a slow feeder with grass hay should she still be fed twice per day?
    Keep a slowfeeder net with grass hay full at all times, divide her alfalfa flake in two meals and forget about the pellets. Cheap, easy and WAY more efficient. If she is still not gaining enough weight, take some pellets, soaked, add ricebran or oil. That should do it for sure.
         
        03-04-2013, 01:21 PM
      #17
    Weanling
    Slow feeder with grass hay, cut the alfalfa, put her on a low NSC feed such as Triple Crown Sr. High fiber, high calorie, low NSC diet.
         

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