IR supplements...do they really work? - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health > Horse Nutrition

IR supplements...do they really work?

This is a discussion on IR supplements...do they really work? within the Horse Nutrition forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Smartpak metaboleeze
  • Do any ir supplements actually work

Like Tree1Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    10-25-2012, 11:58 AM
  #11
Foal
I have a easy keeper who is only 12, and he has the early signs that show metabolism issues. So tried metaboleeze from smartpak (love their supplements) but didnt see much of a improvement. So switched to their Smartcontrol IR and am seeing a great improvement. He gets little to no grain because he's a easy keeper but want to make sure he still gets his nutrients. I have tried smartpak ezkeeper supplements too. Now I probably spend more on supplements than grain, but they do work. My other 3 are on the smartpak omega 3. I've used the chasteberry before on a neighbors horse that showed big signs of cushings...her improvement from chasteberry was fantastic. She was a different horse after I suggested the neighbor try it, in addition to cutting any sweet feed (and little to no grain) as well as added a MSM supplement.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    10-25-2012, 12:28 PM
  #12
Trained
Thanks
Now, did you just add the supplements or did you change anything else also? I think sometimes we see great results and credit it to a supplement where it was actually only part if the improvement.
But I'll definitely check into Smartpac
     
    10-25-2012, 12:53 PM
  #13
Foal
No didnt change anything other than adding the supplement. He only gets what I would equate to a a palm full of strategy (I love purina strategy), just enough to mix his supplement in with (which is also pellet) and still not feel left out when I grain my other horses. (I stall my horses every evening and pasture during the day) Really with the cost comparison of if I had to grain him like a "normal" horse, I really think it equals out with the supplement cost if Im making sense. The same with my other 3, they all get different amounts of grain, just enough to ensure they don't lose weight but not enough that they gain. I know they put recommended feedings on those bags but every horse is different, but I know that if I had to feed them all the recommended feedings it would cost just as much as Im supplementing. I did board a hard to keep TB one time, what a hard boy to put weight on. He got twice as much grain/and had him on smart gain before I started seeing results. And the great thing about smartpak, if you don't see results or your horse is a pick eater and wont eat the supplement they are more than happy to refund your money. They thing very highly of their customer satifaction. I've even had them call me to see how a certain horse is doing on a supplement.
     
    10-25-2012, 02:54 PM
  #14
Trained
Was just out feeding and cleaning, and picking poop always lets me think things through
My neighbor comes to mind. 5 horses, three of them mares and two 2year old colts. Living on pasture, not irrigated, 160acres, together with about 25 cows. No shelter. They came out of the winter pretty skinny, cows even worse. Started gaining when grass came up. If you can call it grass, pasture is not maintained whatsoever. These horses see no vet, farrier, sweetfeed, or v/m supplement or salt ever. Yet they are all in healthy weight now, shiny as can be, and SOUND.
THAT makes me think.

I just read results of a study conducted by UC Davis, CA, I believe, that alfalfa free choice provides 100% of required nutrition for maintenance.
According to that it can't be all that bad.
Lots of people say only good things about oat hay, too.

So where do we do wrong, if this is all right?
     
    10-25-2012, 09:24 PM
  #15
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman    
The Purina I went to because I can't find any RB around here, unless I drive at least 80 miles. Seems like horsefolks here ask only for high octane stuff.
Can you not get it by mail order?
     
    10-25-2012, 09:54 PM
  #16
Trained
I'm still checking the various sources. Soooo much out there
     
    10-25-2012, 10:18 PM
  #17
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman    
Was just out feeding and cleaning, and picking poop always lets me think things through
My neighbor comes to mind. 5 horses, three of them mares and two 2year old colts. Living on pasture, not irrigated, 160acres, together with about 25 cows. No shelter. They came out of the winter pretty skinny, cows even worse. Started gaining when grass came up. If you can call it grass, pasture is not maintained whatsoever. These horses see no vet, farrier, sweetfeed, or v/m supplement or salt ever. Yet they are all in healthy weight now, shiny as can be, and SOUND.
THAT makes me think.

I just read results of a study conducted by UC Davis, CA, I believe, that alfalfa free choice provides 100% of required nutrition for maintenance.
According to that it can't be all that bad.
Lots of people say only good things about oat hay, too.

So where do we do wrong, if this is all right?
160 acres is a lot of land to forage on, even out west where grass is sparse.

They're living as close to being wild as a domestic horse can live, is the only thing I can come up with.

There are many theories on the downfall of the health of domestic horses:

1. What we feed them because, even those of us that recognize them as livestock and not an 1,100 pound dog, feed and treat them like 1,100 lb dogs. I am guilty of the feed part of that thought.

2. Many domestic horses live in tiny acreage and/or are crowded into small dry lots with a big round bail and way too many other horses for such a small space. They don't have room to roam as nature intended. I feel thankful I have 22 acres of rolling hills for my four; it's closest I can afford to keeping them sort of "on the wild side".

3. GMO seeds. GMO's (hybrid) seed created to produce more hay and grain on less acreage and faster to feed the livestock we eat, so they will grow faster and thus end up in the grocery store meat cooler faster.

The seed for that hay and feed is NOT segregated for horses. Horses are second class citizens in the hard core world of money-making livestock and they can "just d*** well eat whatever's out there. Granted there IS horse hay but it's grown from the same GMO seeds as cow hay.

3.1 Same for pastures that folks so carefully re-seed for their horses because they think that old cow pasture they just bought looks too poor.

4. Then there's the adjuvant theory<---those binding agents in vaccines. Who knows precisely how safe they are from batch-to-batch or year-to-year and what the long-term effect is on the horse that had his shots his entire life? Like my 25 yr old with EMS, hind gut ulcers, lipomas, and melanomas in his ears.

5. Water sources - whether they are creeks, ponds or chemically treated city water. That sort of pollution generation hits our news channels once a summer.

We live in a lot more polluted world than we did even 25 years ago and it is showing in our animals. Your neighbor with the 160 acres is lucky as h*** she can still run her livestock as she did 40 or so years ago and they stay healthy. She is the exception, whereas that used to be the Rule

At least, that's my take on it - lol lol lol
     
    10-25-2012, 11:39 PM
  #18
Trained
You know, im convinced that a lot of things you mentioned are true.
If you think about it, 15, 20 years ago horses were fed hay and grain. No designer feeds available. And a lot less laminitis cases. Or tumors, or other freak diseases.
I am a strong believer that you can easily overdo it with medications. Antibiotics and cortisone come to mind. I had a colt, not even three months old who had hurt himself, big wound right above the knee. My friend, registered nurse, said, after checking him for fever, that I shouldn't bombard him with chemicals, should give his body a chance to fight it. He did, healed fine, without a scar or any other problems. All I did is keep it clean.
Vaccines for my horses, tetanus and WNV, that's it. Deworming once a year to catch the bots and tapeworm. I pick poop twice a day in paddock and daily on pasture, my horses are the only ones, so no reinfestation.

Now you got me thinking again lol...I had decided to not put horses on pasture but instead make hay from it. It's old, established cow pasture, 10acres, connected to 5 acres of drylot. So I can set up a "paddock paradise"....and include the pasture after the first cutting......
     
    10-26-2012, 08:56 AM
  #19
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman    
Now you got me thinking again lol...I had decided to not put horses on pasture but instead make hay from it. It's old, established cow pasture, 10acres, connected to 5 acres of drylot. So I can set up a "paddock paradise"....and include the pasture after the first cutting......
It can make a person crazy

I think this is the better idea but, if you have the time and a few extra dollars, I might take soil samples of the pasture to see what it's mineral-deficient in. Supplying the horses with extra of the deficient minerals may be all you'd have to do.

I doubt there's anywhere left in the world that doesn't have soil that's deficient.

Our place is an old cow farm. One of our current pastures once was a soy field but both my horses had metabolic issues a couple years before we ever let them over there.

We have never done anything to this place but put down "horse friendly" weed killer and keep it bushogged.

The Ag guy told me this end of the county is high in iron, therefore deficient in copper and zinc. Both of which are needed for any horse's immune system and are crucial for stablizing insulin in metabolic horses.

I never had this soil tested but the hay I bought for 8 years is grown five miles away and it always tested slightly high in iron. If I had to blame the environment, I would say those two things pushed my two predisposed horses over the edge.

My hay guy lost his entire first cut this year. Not being a gambler, I wasn't playing the Second Cut Waiting Game, and bought the same type of grass hay grown on the other end of the county. I didn't get it tested but there is a difference in how the horses look and act; especially the two metabolic horses. Truthfully I was afraid to have it tested for fear of what I might NOT want to read, since they are doing so well - lol lol

We should not have to tear our hair out trying become "half a horse nutritionist" to keep everybody healthy but it appears, the environment and other things have forced us into that.

I am all for letting your crew have Free Range, at least at night, and bring them into that big honkin' dry lot/paddock paradise during the day. Five acres of dry lot, you lucky dog; I just hope it's not close to the house windows
     
    10-26-2012, 11:29 AM
  #20
Trained
Well, it is
Right across the driveway
Ours is also a former dairy. Its been cleaned up but not enough, so there is still a lot of work to do. And talking about fences.....meshwire fence is there, decorated with some barbed wire here and there, so electric tape needs to be put up. In the middle is a nice level patch, makes a beautiful 60x120 arena. Room for a round pen too. So fencing that off creates a track I.e. The paddock paradise. The next patch will be included and is the connection to the pasture. Pasture needs fence redone too. We have it grazed down by neighbor's cows right now to see what's under all the grass....and weeds(the guy who had it before had it understocked and didn't take care of it, didn't water enough or too much, so there are holes and bumps everywhere)

Currently horses have a small paddock right next to the house with a run-in, which has to be extended, it's a bit small for two horses. We can connect this one with the two big lots easily.

I consider myself extremely lucky to have found a place like that here. Its dairies and crops here, so you can imagine how hard it is to find acreage for horses for a decent price. Place is only rented and the horse commodities cost as 100$ a month. Needless to say were staying, unless we find THE perfect place for sale

What do you use for broadleaf control? I was told to use 2 4 D, but here you need a license for it, go figure....
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
calming supplements... will they work for a weaver MudPaint Horse Health 6 12-06-2011 02:11 AM
Joint supplements- do they work? horseluver250 Horse Health 12 07-21-2011 12:03 AM
does muscle building supplements work or not? daron Horse Health 0 04-22-2010 11:52 PM
work, work, work! Poor pony :( justsambam08 Horse Pictures 6 04-18-2010 02:07 AM
haflinger to trainer ground work or saddle work????? carriegeorge100 Horse Training 3 05-10-2007 02:43 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:33 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0