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Malnutritioned horse and dung question

This is a discussion on Malnutritioned horse and dung question within the Horse Nutrition forums, part of the Horse Health category

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        11-19-2013, 12:29 PM
      #31
    Super Moderator
    If the other horses have worms then feeding him their poop might just increase his worm burden - it is possible for horses to carry worms and still look healthy if they are well fed
    The Selenavite is one I'm familiar with from the UK and I've used it myself on horses I've bought in poor condition and in the days when I fed only micronized grains like oats, barley, maize(corn), soya, peas & beans with chopped hay and oat straw and soaked sugar beet shreds rather than the complete pelleted feeds I buy now.
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        11-19-2013, 02:02 PM
      #32
    Trained
    He is already looking better . His hooves are a little long, but not bad at all... the typical thoroughbred feet. I wouldn't put shoes on, as long as this is the ground he is living on. It will be better if he can grow nice feet( with the help of good nutrition) before they get restricted with metal shoes.
    I also agree to wait with exercise. Maybe take him for a walk with halter and lead rope, around the premises.

    This is definitely wheat straw. If you can find some clover hay, to mix with the straw, that would give more calories and, more important, balance the calcium: phosphorus ratio. It should be 2:1, I bet right now it's 1:1, or worse.
    Also, make sure he has always something to eat (roughage)in front of him. This is the most important thing, for weight, for energy, for happiness.

    The supplement is, as far as I can see, vitamin E and selenium, needed for muscles. Good to know that you have a vet pharmacy there, if you cannot find any clover hay, you can get a calcium supplement there, I'm sure.
         
        11-19-2013, 04:21 PM
      #33
    Super Moderator
    In the days when we used straw as general bedding rather than shavings we always used wheat straw for horses that had a tendency to eat their bed - as they actually didn't find it very appealing
    Oat straw is mostly used in chaff mixes or to feed with hay for extra bulk but less food value for easy keepers
    Barley straw they love to eat but is a high colic risk
         
        11-19-2013, 04:29 PM
      #34
    Foal
    Hello deserthorsewoman

    From what I know, the big cylinder things in his food are clover patties.

    Adding clover hay in with the straw wouldn't make it an overkill?
    It has too much sugar in and as other users suggested it is not a good idea.

    Also somebody suggested that we should lower his straw portions. Something about toxins not helping him store nutrients. ???

    I will call the pharmacy tomorrow and ask if they have something for ulcers.
    If I am lucky they will have something not overly expensive.
         
        11-19-2013, 05:05 PM
      #35
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by geocy    
    Hello deserthorsewoman

    From what I know, the big cylinder things in his food are clover patties.

    Adding clover hay in with the straw wouldn't make it an overkill?
    It has too much sugar in and as other users suggested it is not a good idea.

    Also somebody suggested that we should lower his straw portions. Something about toxins not helping him store nutrients. ???

    I will call the pharmacy tomorrow and ask if they have something for ulcers.
    If I am lucky they will have something not overly expensive.
    Straw is basically bedding material, as jaydee mentioned, not much nutrition there, apart from coarse fiber and phosphorus. Normally horses who are given hay enough won't even touch straw, or maybe eat the grain hulls which didn't fall off at harvesting. If you have" rich", nutrient- dense hay, like clover hay is, it is usually "diluted" with straw, and so balances each other and brings calories down. Now if you take into consideration that a house should eat around 2% of its bodyweight, preferably in roughage, and grains only added if more calories are needed for work or, as in your case, weight gain. Ideal weight, let's say, 450kg, that would be 9kg of hay daily. If you would go 50/50 straw and clover hay( since that is what you said you can find), you would need to feed 4,5kg of each.
    I will look up calories for you to get an idea.
    As I have explained earlier, the ulcers will not get better, no matter what medicine he gets, if he doesn't have something in his stomach to keep the acids from destroying the mucous membranes in the stomach. And I bet once he has enough roughage, his poop will improve drastically. Just start adding the clover slowly as to not overwhelm his digestive system.
    Now I'll go and find the calories.....
         
        11-19-2013, 05:08 PM
      #36
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jaydee    
    In the days when we used straw as general bedding rather than shavings we always used wheat straw for horses that had a tendency to eat their bed - as they actually didn't find it very appealing
    Oat straw is mostly used in chaff mixes or to feed with hay for extra bulk but less food value for easy keepers
    Barley straw they love to eat but is a high colic risk
    Mine would always eat a little straw after beds were made, even leave their hay. Wheat straw, mainly, they would dive into oat straw for a couple of days but then wouldn't touch it. Barley straw was not liked.
         
        12-03-2013, 03:44 PM
      #37
    Foal
    Just a little update. We just finished a 7day cycle with human probiotics. 4x the human portion. But no improvement on his poop. Clover hay is way expensive and now I can only get fresh. I think I can find some of that powdered milk for babies. I will start him on this and see if it helps him on his poop also since that I am told it has probiotics also in. And also hope he puts more weight on
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        12-03-2013, 03:56 PM
      #38
    Showing
    My arab passed poop like that almost all his life, regardless of his diet, unless he got into a certain thistle blossom, then it was cow pies.
         
        12-04-2013, 08:34 AM
      #39
    Started
    Yogurt, homemade yogurt. It's loaded with good bacteria cultures and should be readily available to you. Try mixing a few spoonfuls of it with a little grain. Yogurt made from goat milk would be best because the fat and protein will be easier for him to digest. I'm willing to bet there is some old lady nearby that makes her own yogurt and will sell you a cup now and then. It won't take much. Just a couple spoonfuls with each meal for a while.

    Diatomaceous earth would be a good calcium source. They do make a food grade DE. If it isn't to be found then just plain old garden lime. Not hydrated lime or quick lime, just plain old ground up limestone. If you do that, again just a spoonful or two and I would mist it with a little water because the dust can irritate the lungs. Foods with a lot of calcium will also help if he has ulcers. Alfalfa pellets come to mind. Little bit of fresh vegetables like cabbage or broccoli have a lot of calcium. A little bit...cabbage and closely related plants can cause gas and increase his discomfort. You have to do any food changes slowly with a horse. I would feed it as more of a healthy treat than a meal. One of my horses loves broccoli that I didn't get to before it flowered. The other 2 do not like it.

    Little bit of cooking oil over the lime would do the same as the water and add calories. I'd only add a little bit at first though. Olive oil works, flax oil would be better.

    I agree with the others in saying let him have all the hay he will eat. Horses are made to have something in their stomachs almost constantly.

    I assume all of your commercial feeds are coming from Greece or Turkey by boat. If you can find something that is made with a lot of alfalfa that would be best. I have no idea what else might be available. Stay away from feeds made with a lot of corn/maize. That is the hardest of all the grains for a horse to digest.

    Does he have a salt lick available? You are in the perfect place to have a nice sea salt available to him.

    Trying to think...hot, dry place compared to where I live...Sunflowers? Seed or oil? Black oil sunflower seeds are a good fat source and protein.

    Beet pulp - you need to soak it first
    Soy beans
    Dried peas
         
        12-04-2013, 09:49 AM
      #40
    Super Moderator
    I think a lot of the horse feed in Europe come from the UK, France, Germany & Holland where they've got bigger established companies because they have longer history of competitive & leisure riding
    Honestly - What this horse needs is good quality hay - straw might be OK as a filler but a lot of it is indigestible with no food value and is just going to go straight through
    If you can't get hay then can you get any of the Dengie chopped hay and oat straw products?
    What brand name feeds does your local store sell?
         

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