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Peanut Hay?

This is a discussion on Peanut Hay? within the Horse Nutrition forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Can horses eat pernnial peanuts
  • Why can't horses eat peanut hay

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    10-15-2012, 05:34 PM
  #11
Trained
I can hear him now:

"But Mom, I NEED the blubber for the winter, otherwise I might freeze to death!:

Speaking of which you're late on pictures of the chubmuffin...
     
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    10-15-2012, 08:07 PM
  #12
Green Broke
Lol he's got that supa cool pink blanket for that!

I'll have to dig around for a few pictures of him, I took a few last week when I was home.
     
    10-16-2012, 08:00 AM
  #13
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by SorrelHorse    
Drum, Hickory needs to stop eating. Him and Selena need some serious Jenny Craig.
Add Woodstock to that list. Pretty sure he needs some 12 step meetings, overeaters anonymous perhaps? He's my winter project since I will have time to commit to him when I get back from vacation, if I have a girth to fit his roundness that is. Pretty sure he could get through winter on his fat stores alone and likely still come out of winter fluffy He is the epitome of fat, easy keeper gelding. I'd put money down that he is fatter than Hick right now

I wish I had access to peanut hay, I'd certainly feed it if I did. Not something grown around here but I have seen it (and had to judge it with no knowledge - yikes) back in the day at hippology nationals and remember discussing it's merits.
     
    10-16-2012, 10:56 AM
  #14
Green Broke
He's not AS fat as usual..still fluffy but I've been working him when I'm home so he's looking a little better lol..

Photobomb of Fatty, I mean Hickory requested by SorrelHorse.
     
    10-16-2012, 02:05 PM
  #15
Green Broke
Alright..So, my boyfriend talked to a farmer today about getting a few round bales from him and the guy said I can't feed peanut hay to a horse, it will kill it.. Is he just not informed about it or right? I highly doubt he's right, unless it was a colic or like wise, but he seemed pretty serious about it.

Apparently "It has too much dirt and would stop their intestines up."
     
    10-16-2012, 02:34 PM
  #16
Showing
Never having seen an actual bale just samples on a board, no help there. I could see how it could have too much dirt in it though - thinking about the corn fodder that gets baled and fed to cattle here and it would be pretty dirty. Hmmm.
     
    10-16-2012, 02:37 PM
  #17
Green Broke
I want to see if I can find a square bale before jumping into buying a round bale.. All I can find online is that it's just second to alfalfa..Can't find anything bad about it..This particular farmer has horses and he really has no business with them.. He feeds them cow hay, no grain, no minerals... nothing..Even in winter and his horses are all over the place with their weight. Just not a good situation.. I'm going to research it a good bit more before deciding anything permanent. I just hope it works out and I'm able to feed it.
     
    12-13-2012, 11:02 PM
  #18
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrumRunner    
Alright..So, my boyfriend talked to a farmer today about getting a few round bales from him and the guy said I can't feed peanut hay to a horse, it will kill it.. Is he just not informed about it or right? I highly doubt he's right, unless it was a colic or like wise, but he seemed pretty serious about it.

Apparently "It has too much dirt and would stop their intestines up."
Was reading older threads when I came up on this one. As nobody responded to this I thought I would.

There is peanut hay and there is peanut "hay". The kind that is accepted as good feed for animals is not a by product of peanuts. It is grown simply for forage and when done right is gorgeous hay that smells wonderfully. I don't know of anyone that has fed it to horses, only goats so can't comment on how horses would do with it.

I expect what your peanut hay guy was talking about was the plants that actually grew peanuts and then was baled when the peanuts were harvested.
I wouldn't feed that to a horse for sure. It's coarse leaves with thick stems and usually lots of dirt mixed in. Maybe cows could handle it but if I had cows I wouldn't even want to feed it to them. We grew a small patch of peanuts one year and after harvest I offered a handful of the plants to my goats. They said "no thank you."

Just thought I'd comment in case anyone should be looking for peanut hay so they'd know what to ask the seller.
     
    12-14-2012, 05:49 AM
  #19
Foal
Peanut hay, the kind we feed to horses, is in reality called perennial peanut. Very nice plant with pretty yellow flowers - where are you located? I'm in Florida, and aside from coastal, it's the only hay that grows well here. It's just a lot of time and investment in the beginning, which is why there aren't as many farmers growing it as coastal. Like what Acorn said above, perennial peanut and the side product of peanut farming are two very different things, and I would not feed peanut farming left overs to the horses.

If it IS pp hay, then you should be fine, as that does come in round bales and is fed quite safely around here. I've yet to meet a horse that doesn't love it and thrive on it.
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    12-14-2012, 08:27 AM
  #20
Green Broke
Horses really go for it, we use small amounts of it on endurance rides. It perks the horses interest in eating right up. Must be pretty tasty.
     

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