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The perfect diet?

This is a discussion on The perfect diet? within the Horse Nutrition forums, part of the Horse Health category

     
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        02-22-2011, 01:13 PM
      #21
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Peggysue    
    AB every horse HAS to have forage be in hay, cubes or grass that is what keeps their system working. Very few horses can't do hay at all even smooth mouths need hay to keep the saliva flowing
    Yes, but there are horses who can not just have baled hay.
         
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        02-22-2011, 03:57 PM
      #22
    Started
    I have yet to run into one or even HEAR of one... the only time I have even heard of it is after colic surgery when they don't want the "bulk" in the stomack

    MN this might help you a bit Keep in mind all numbers are "averages"

    Green Pasture 245
    Orchard Grass Hay 872
    Alfalfa Hay 977
    Timothy Hay 804
    Alfalfa Pellets 970
    Corn 1,536
    Premium Oats 1,250
    Rice Bran 1,600
    Corn Oil 4,081

    You can see that you would need twice as much alfalfa as you would rice bran and the sheer volume of alfalfa makes a difference as well. With my mare Sassy she won't eat enough hay when being ridden hard to consume the calories needed so I have to use something with less volume and more calories like a fat source (rice Bran)
         
        02-23-2011, 02:51 PM
      #23
    Started
    So much goes into deciding what will be the best diet for your horse. It's nice to see so many people that are actually doing the research needed to properly feed their animals. :)

    I'll be honest - it took me quite some time to figure out what was the best diet for my OTTB. My first horse was an appy mare who I swear would plump out just LOOKING at food (of any kind). She would maintain a lovely weight/condition on just orchard grass/alfalfa mix alone. Then I got my TB and hay alone just does not cut it. It doesn't matter how much hay you give him (free choice even and good quality) he still will not maintain weight/condition as he should. So I did research and picked as many people's brains as I could to come up with a plan. At this point - to keep him in just good condition (as in not show/performance condition) he gets orchard grass/alfalfa mix hay (~28lbs/day), 5lbs of strategy healthy edge (the higher fat concentration in this formula compared to the regular strategy makes a HUGE difference in both his condition and mental state), 5 lbs of a stable mix locally milled (Elk Grove Milling Product Line | Stable Mix) plus his supplements (probios, u-guard, glucosamine, msm, and electrolytes).

    I honestly never imagined i'd have a horse that had such specific dietary needs - but i'm glad I spent the time to learn what I could and made the best choices for him. To the op, sounds like you'll do the same for your horse. ;)
         
        02-23-2011, 09:48 PM
      #24
    Foal
    Quote:
    I swear would plump out just LOOKING at food
    Gee that sounds like me :roll:

    Quote:
    sounds like you'll do the same for your horse. ;)
    Thanks :) It sounds like horse diets are definitely more complicated than dogs! I will dig back into this when I get a horse and can put up details about it, like weight condition

    Thanks everyone for the input!
         
        02-24-2011, 08:42 AM
      #25
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Peggysue    
    I have yet to run into one or even HEAR of one... the only time I have even heard of it is after colic surgery when they don't want the "bulk" in the stomack
    Bingo. I know of two horses who have not been allowed to have normal hay since their colic surgery and this is years later.

    I also know of a horse with heaves that it does not seem to matter if you water the hay down like crazy, etc, she still has problems with it. So, no hay for her either.

    I am glad your small circles of friends and acquaintances have never had a horse that had problems like this.


    Again, I agree that good hay should be where you start for just about any horse. I just wanted to make sure it was stated that not every horse can have hay. I am not saying it is all that common. Just stating that it is true.
         
        02-24-2011, 07:34 PM
      #26
    Started
    AB those are PROBLEM horses not ones that most people are going to run into and heaven forbid a first time horse owner get into that mess

    My small circle of frineds?? Gee you knwo me so well you have no clue about me or what I have done or where I have been.
         
        02-25-2011, 10:10 AM
      #27
    mls
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Peggysue    
    AB those are PROBLEM horses not ones that most people are going to run into and heaven forbid a first time horse owner get into that mess
    Define most people.

    I have a boarder - first time horse owner even - has a horse that cannot have hay.

    Another boarder's horse can have very limited hay.

    Boarding interview on Sunday - one of the horses the folks have - cannot have hay.

    Have had many come through the clinic that cannot have hay.

    It's more common than you think.
         
        02-25-2011, 10:17 AM
      #28
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Peggysue    
    AB those are PROBLEM horses not ones that most people are going to run into and heaven forbid a first time horse owner get into that mess
    Lots of people actually start out with a 'problem horse' (to use your term, not one I would pick). Beginners tend to buy a been there done that older campaigner, which frequently has problems associated with their older years.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Peggysue    
    My small circle of frineds?? Gee you knwo me so well you have no clue about me or what I have done or where I have been.
    It was wrong of me to assume, yes. You are the one who said:
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Peggysue
    I have yet to run into one or even HEAR of one
    If you have never even heard of one you either are not associated with lots of horses or have not paid attention much.

    Like MLS said, it is far more common than you are implying it is.
         
        02-25-2011, 10:21 AM
      #29
    mls
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Alwaysbehind    
    Lots of people actually start out with a 'problem horse' (to use your term, not one I would pick). Beginners tend to buy a been there done that older campaigner, which frequently has problems associated with their older years.

    If you have never even heard of one you either are not associated with lots of horses or have not paid attention much.
    Very true AB.

    With the advances in medicine, the doctors and true nutrition experts need to stay on top of things. Thus issues are more commonplace. Ever notice all of the geriatric horses out there? As the horse population is able to live longer, we need to understand how to care for them.
         
        02-25-2011, 10:27 AM
      #30
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Alwaysbehind    
    Like MLS said, it is far more common than you are implying it is.

    Yes, it is. I'm surprised you've never run into a horse like that Peggy, because I've known several.
         

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