pregnant horse feeding?
 
 

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pregnant horse feeding?

This is a discussion on pregnant horse feeding? within the Horse Nutrition forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Pregnant horse feeding
  • Pregnant horse nutrition

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  • 2 Post By deserthorsewoman
  • 1 Post By Freemare

 
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    09-20-2013, 10:17 AM
  #1
Yearling
pregnant horse feeding?

I let my neighbor keep his standardbred in my pasture -- was recently discovered to be pregnant -- she started getting fat --- and got fatter - and last month she started carrying it lower ---- no one knows how pregnant she is since this wasn't exactly planned

I feed the horses (my 2 and his 1) --- they have 24/7 access to pasture, salt block, mineral block, and loose hay.

One of my horses is a 17 month old -- we drop buckets of feed in the pasture and they figure out who gets which bucket --- I don't currently have a way to seperate them out to feed each one something different (working on this)

So I have been mixing 1 bag of dumors 12% pleasure horse feed with 1 bag of nutrena's mare and foal

I feed them this mix twice a day using one of the 3 quart feed scoops

In the mornings I add 1 pack of gelatin to each bucket to help with their hooves (been really dry here lately) and if I know it is going to be in the mid-90's or hotter -- I will add a scoop of electrolytes


Am I missing something?

They all look healthy and a little bit thick -- pregnant mares ribs are barely showing, can't see them unless she moves or is stretched out


--- I am not paying her vet bills or anything -- just making sure she gets fed
     
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    09-20-2013, 11:25 AM
  #2
Trained
If they're in good condition you're doing the right thing, tho not ideal. The Dumor, from what I hear, is rather low quality, the mare&foal levels it out tho. For now.
I'd have a talk with the owner of the pregnant mare what they have in mind for her....where the foal should be born( stall, outside), who's responsible, vet care should something go wrong. Also, the last trimester of pregnancy and the first three months of lactation are critical for the foal, so she should be fed separately and the mare&foal only, and of course grass/hay free choice.
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    09-20-2013, 11:26 AM
  #3
Weanling
You don't need to change any feed till the last 3 months. Then you need to up her feed. That is when the foal is growing the most. If I where you. When you feed grain I would pull the mare out. You need to make sure she is getting everything she needs. I will have to look at my nutrition book to find out how many calories she needs. Don't know off the top of my head.
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    09-20-2013, 11:29 AM
  #4
Started
A pregnant mare does not need anything magical. She will eat the same thing she would as an open mare for the first 8 months. The last 3, she will eat more of everything just to pack on some weight and to provide energy for the fetus to grow. She will feed the fetus first so if her weight is good, she is getting enough calories for herself as well. What she could be missing is adequate vitamins and minerals. Tough to tell when they are out on mature summer pasture. You can continue with what you are doing but is the younger growing one getting adequate protein? In a mixed herd, you would feed for the one who needs the most. Personally, I would ditch the mineral block, it is nothing more than a colored salt block with minimal (2%) trace minerals. Those are the minerals a horse needs in very small amounts and typically is not deficient in them as they are in all prepared feeds and in the soil. It does not provide minerals that the horse needs in large amounts at all. I would provide a quality loose mineral and vitamin blend for all the horses. Look at a Dumor or Southern States product that is no more than 30% salt. I am not familiar with their products as they are not sold in my area but they should be optimally blended for the south. That leaves room for plenty of minerals and vitamins. This will eliminate the need for added electrolytes. Electrolytes is just a fancy and expen$$ive way of saying salt with added minerals.

The mare will quickly need 50% more of everything just to keep her weight up. You can tie everyone up at feeding time to make sure the dominant horse does not eat more than he needs. You can also feed the mare an additional meal outside by herself (make that her owner's problem) or when you are out working your horses.
     
    09-20-2013, 12:46 PM
  #5
Yearling
Thank you for the input

He was supposed to be providing feed for his horse -- hasn't happened and I refuse to let them go without feed --- especially now

If he wants to change his horses diet to something other than what I am providing free of cost -- he can provide the feed

Don't get me wrong -- I really enjoy having his horse there and it convinced me to get one (two) of my own
     
    09-20-2013, 12:50 PM
  #6
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Left Hand Percherons    
A pregnant mare does not need anything magical. She will eat the same thing she would as an open mare for the first 8 months. The last 3, she will eat more of everything just to pack on some weight and to provide energy for the fetus to grow. She will feed the fetus first so if her weight is good, she is getting enough calories for herself as well. What she could be missing is adequate vitamins and minerals. Tough to tell when they are out on mature summer pasture. You can continue with what you are doing but is the younger growing one getting adequate protein? In a mixed herd, you would feed for the one who needs the most. Personally, I would ditch the mineral block, it is nothing more than a colored salt block with minimal (2%) trace minerals. Those are the minerals a horse needs in very small amounts and typically is not deficient in them as they are in all prepared feeds and in the soil. It does not provide minerals that the horse needs in large amounts at all. I would provide a quality loose mineral and vitamin blend for all the horses. Look at a Dumor or Southern States product that is no more than 30% salt. I am not familiar with their products as they are not sold in my area but they should be optimally blended for the south. That leaves room for plenty of minerals and vitamins. This will eliminate the need for added electrolytes. Electrolytes is just a fancy and expen$$ive way of saying salt with added minerals.

The mare will quickly need 50% more of everything just to keep her weight up. You can tie everyone up at feeding time to make sure the dominant horse does not eat more than he needs. You can also feed the mare an additional meal outside by herself (make that her owner's problem) or when you are out working your horses.
no worries --- she is the dominant one --- if I put out a single food bucket -- she will get it all
     
    09-20-2013, 04:37 PM
  #7
Trained
Make sure no fescue the last 2-3 months (if there is fescue in your area).
     
    09-20-2013, 05:45 PM
  #8
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaintHorseMares    
Make sure no fescue the last 2-3 months (if there is fescue in your area).
looks like I might be too far south for fescue
     
    09-24-2013, 07:11 AM
  #9
Trained
Hiya, agree with the above, excepting the 'last 3 months' business. According to a well respected equine nutritionist, I've been told that it's the first month or few that the horse may need a little more energy, then after that, she should only be fed as per normal maintenance. It's that people assume the bigger the foal is, the more the mare needs.

Good nutrition is of course important right the way through(the baby typically sucks what they need from the mare, so baby doesn't usually suffer malnutrition, but Mama does... why 'they' say women traditionally lose a tooth per child they have!). Then after she's foaled, she may well need a lot more calories to hold her weight while lactating.
     

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