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skinny new horses

This is a discussion on skinny new horses within the Horse Nutrition forums, part of the Horse Health category

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        12-09-2013, 01:47 AM
      #21
    Started
    My first thought when I saw this picture was ouch. In this condition as was mentioned before you could damage his spine or internal organs. The pressure on his spine must of been very uncomfortable, you could damage is nerves permanently. Could you imagine yourself being sickly and weak with bones protruding and then you were told to put something heavy on your back and work. This horse should have absolutely nothing on his back, that's cruel IMO. That horse I rehabbed that put pictures to show you. Nothing and I do mean nothing touched his back except a brush for grooming for almost a year. I would take him out and give him attention every once in awhile but besides that he didn't leave the pasture. This horse doesn't need exercise he needs to consume calories and that's it.
    amp23 likes this.
         
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        12-09-2013, 07:48 AM
      #22
    Foal
    That is your opinion. There are many thousands of horses that naturally have higher withers and backs. Like thoroughbreds for instance. If you look back about 4 or 5 generations there is a 100% thoroughbred mare bred to a half quarter thoroughbred. He has racing quarter horse bloodlines which make him leaner, taller 16h, and longer neck and higher withers. He had a 15lb saddle pad and saddle on plus myself at 117lbs which would make 132lbs which is about 13-14% of his body weight. Not being as sickly as you must think he could easily carry 20% of his body weight. Which at 1000lbs that is 200lbs. Giving he needs a little more weight I only walked him around a 1/4 trail. Thanks for being rude in giving your opinion though peppy barrel racing. Have a pleasant day in the cold. I'll take a nice ride for you in the 78 degree weather here in horse country ocala.
         
        12-09-2013, 08:09 AM
      #23
    Weanling
    *sighs* For me the issue is the weight on his back with that very poor fitting saddle. There is no excuse for that. He is yours, ride him....but please find a different saddle for the poor thing.

    As for being cold, a ride through the snow is very beautiful, peaceful, quiet. Would I want to do it for 10 months a year....hell no....lololol
         
        12-09-2013, 08:32 AM
      #24
    Started
    I wasn't being rude I'm being honest. I'm trying to prevent you from ruining him pemenantly. But you're only thinking about yourself and riding the horses not the damage you can do down the road. I mean he's already prown to being navicular and have arthritis with the knee problems he has but instead of giving him a chance to heal and get healthy you instead OP to KNOWINGLY injuring this horses spine. There is zero muscle or padding on there his back is fragile. You could give him sway back I mean you might as well be riding a yearling colt that's probably how delicate his spine is. Sure he can hold you up (I wasn't calling you fat or anything) but seriously I can see how bad this horse feels there's now brightness or energy to him in the pics. Give him a chance to heal all he needs is your love an patience. Give it to him. If you keep riding him you'll be lucky to ride him at all later even if he does get his weight back. Btw your example of horses 5 generations back in the race industry which is can be quite cruel to begin with and secondly if you are treating horses how they were treated 100 years ago you are not really making a case for yourself there.
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        12-09-2013, 08:36 AM
      #25
    Showing
    The saddle appears down on his withers. That is painful and it may be why his eye doesn't appear bright. Horses tolerate a fair amount of pain but one can't assume they aren't hurting. I'm seeing a horse that is mentally shut down. I don't get the big hurry to ride them.
         
        12-09-2013, 12:49 PM
      #26
    Foal
    I can put 3 fingers between the tree and his back. No this horse is not mentally shut down. And I wasn't referring to the race horses 100 years ago. All thoroughbreds have that and so do some of the racing quarter horses with thoroughbred blood. A walk isn't going to kill him or give him swayback. He's not starved just underweight. He loves going through the trails and walks like he has a purpose. So I'll let him tell me when he's not feeling well enough
         
        12-09-2013, 12:56 PM
      #27
    Yearling
    That saddle in no way, shape, or form fits. Not even a child could get three fingers in between that horse's withers and your saddle. I have a TB, and he has shark fin withers, even at the proper weight your horse's withers having nothing on my horse's, so don't try and play the high withers card. You can do permanent damage to his back and mind if you continue riding him in that saddle. I don't even agree with you riding him period, but I can't stop you, and if you're going to at least have the decency to get a saddle that fits him a little better.
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        12-09-2013, 07:57 PM
      #28
    Started
    He is not considered underweight at this point he is considered emaciated. I know for a fact just from those pics you can feel every vertebra and rib that's not called underweight at that point. Your selfish inability to wait a few months for the horse recouperate is painful and cruel.
         
        12-09-2013, 08:19 PM
      #29
    Teen Forum Moderator
    I personally would not consider the gelding to be emaciated, but definitely underweight. Too thin to be ridden but not in danger. The other two are still what I would consider emaciated- especially the mare. The stallion is almost to a weight that I would consider just thin, but not yet.

    OP I think that you will find with more weight (which just takes time!) the saddle might fit better. Until then I do firmly believe that riding him isn't going to do either of you any good. The horses are lucky that you took them in and saved them from starvation, but the thing with rescues like this is that you must exercise a LOT of patience. Believe me when I say that I understand that it is hard, but it is worth it!

    This question is directed at the OP only- does the right side, about mid-way up, of your stallions neck look/feel warm or lumpy to you? It could easily be just the picture tricking me but for some reason it looks swollen and not right to me. Was he bitten by a tick/stung by something, or perhaps kicked?
         
        12-09-2013, 08:47 PM
      #30
    Foal
    * shakes her head and walks away*
         

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