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Slowing down feeding? My options?

This is a discussion on Slowing down feeding? My options? within the Horse Nutrition forums, part of the Horse Health category

     
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        01-01-2011, 06:41 PM
      #21
    Trained
    Poor quality doesn't mean mouldy or full of debris - it generally just means not the best quality pasture was cut for the hay, or it may have gotten wet and then dried again (Makes great hay for ponies as it is pre-soaked!). Generally poor quality hay will mean hay with less sugar.
         
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        01-01-2011, 07:51 PM
      #22
    Weanling
    Ohh... I always thought that hay that was wet and then dried could get moldy?
         
        01-01-2011, 09:17 PM
      #23
    Trained
    ^ Mould only grows when hay is moist - So if it gets wet but then dries completely it is fine. Only when moisture is trapped and creates heat does mould start to grow. That is why it is very bad if baled hay gets wet, because the inside of the bale can't dry. However if cut but not baled hay gets wet often the farmers will turn it so it dries - They can't bale it wet or no one would buy it.
         
        01-02-2011, 12:25 AM
      #24
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Izz    
    Wallaby, could you be kind to post a picture of this "manger thing" you are feeding your horse from? It sounds interesting to me since it makes your horse eat that slow.

    I don't understand why you want the horse to eat even slower and cut down on the amount also? You obiously have a system that works very fine! Lucky you Instead of cutting down on the amount of feed, perhaps you could increase the workout for her? Just a suggestion if possible.
    Here's a picture of the manger thing (I'm sure there's a better name for it, I just for the life of me can't remember exactly what it is. Haha!) It's about 12 feet long and divided into three sections. About 3.5 flakes of the grass hay will fit into one section so I usually do that, just stuff one section full.



    I just wanted to make sure my system was "right", I suppose... I've never been in charge of feeding a horse for longer than 3 months by myself, and I've never been feeding a horse I care about by myself, so I want to make sure I'm doing it perfect, yknow? I've read that slower is better and I wasn't sure if she was eating slowly enough or if it should be slower.

    And on the working her front, her current living situation is such that every ride is at least an hour long trail ride (I could turn back sooner, but she's that kind of horse where if you turn back early once, you're going to be fighting with her the next 5 rides because she wants to turn around where you turned around sooner every time) and I just don't have the time to do that daily. :( I try to get her out at least 2-3 times a week but I would really like to be riding everyday or 4 times a week, at least. Her pasture is so hilly (and currently so muddy) that just hopping on bareback is difficult as well.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wild_spot    
    Horses are designed to be constantly eating poor quality hay. I think your system sounds fine!

    Lucerne/alfalfa, especially soaked, is actually a good hay for founder risks as it is low in sugar compared to most grass hays. It's energy comes from protein.

    Poor quality grass hay is also recommended as a good filler for founder risks - less sugar.

    So basically you are doing the exact right thing. Keeping her belly full with lower sugar hats, and the alfalfa is supplying energy in the form of protein, not sugar. If you need some more calories when she is working, I would add in a high fat feed like rice bran or soybean meal. Add a molasses free mineral block and that is basically the perfect management plan for an older, founder prone pony.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Oh cool! Thanks for the info!
    I do need to get her a mineral block. I've been kinda scared to look at how much they cost. I suppose they last basically forever with one horse, right?
         
        01-02-2011, 07:01 AM
      #25
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Wallaby    
    I feed her yuckier stuff (I've just really assumed that it was "crappy" because it's more of a golden brown, no green, but smells good and it's soft,...
    Be careful when judging hay. The color of the hay has little to do with the its nutritional value, and its smell (to us) little to do with its palateability to a horse. Similarly, hay of the same type (e.g. Timothy or Orchard) can vary widely in nutritional quality from one supplier to another. For horses that live on hay (not just to supply belly filling forage), I suggest spending the same time, effort, and $$s into knowing what your horse is eating as people do when choosing feeds, and you'll never have to worry.
         
        01-04-2011, 01:51 AM
      #26
    Yearling
    I see nothing wrong with your feed schedule, but like PHM mentioned, I'd find out what's in the "crap hay"! I'm curious, does she live with you? Where do you board that you have to feed her yourself? Is it a self board facility? Perhaps work a deal with another boarder to switch off feeding? They do morning, you in the afternoon? I'd HIGHLY recommend aviod hay nets as they can be dangerous, and if only you check on her once a day, I'd worry she'd get a leg through it. Happened to my mom's miniature gelding, she found him tangled in it. Making piles around her field (nearby the run in) will add time to her munching and will actually keep them warmer having to move around pile to pile!
         
        01-04-2011, 02:20 AM
      #27
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PaintHorseMares    
    Be careful when judging hay. The color of the hay has little to do with the its nutritional value, and its smell (to us) little to do with its palateability to a horse. Similarly, hay of the same type (e.g. Timothy or Orchard) can vary widely in nutritional quality from one supplier to another. For horses that live on hay (not just to supply belly filling forage), I suggest spending the same time, effort, and $$s into knowing what your horse is eating as people do when choosing feeds, and you'll never have to worry.
    How would I go about finding out the exact quality of her hay? Is there a way to get it analyzed or something? That sounds like a really good idea.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by EveningShadows    
    I'm curious, does she live with you? Where do you board that you have to feed her yourself? Is it a self board facility? Perhaps work a deal with another boarder to switch off feeding? They do morning, you in the afternoon? I'd HIGHLY recommend aviod hay nets as they can be dangerous, and if only you check on her once a day, I'd worry she'd get a leg through it. Happened to my mom's miniature gelding, she found him tangled in it. Making piles around her field (nearby the run in) will add time to her munching and will actually keep them warmer having to move around pile to pile!
    She lives at my neighbor's house, so technically with me. It's about a seven-ten minute walk over there so I'd like to not have to do that more than once a day, but I really could if it's necessary. I think I may start feeding twice on Tuesday's and Thursday's, at least, since I have class from 10:30 to 4 and while 10 is a little early to feed, 4 is a little late (since it's almost dark then). I worry about feeding in the dark since Lacey can't see well in the dark, as diagnosed by the vet, and I don't want to worry her by "creeping" around when she can't see me, yknow?

    I'll try that with making more piles of hay tomorrow. I was actually thinking about the possibility of making more piles and where I could put them so that they'd stay relatively dry if it rained, while still encouraging her to move, and I think I came up with a few good spots. I'll have to try them tomorrow. :)
         
        01-04-2011, 10:20 AM
      #28
    Started
    GO to ebay and buy a net, hook it to the inside of the manager :) slow feeder and it will help tons... and I personally would put all her hay in theremost hay lack nutritinally or are unbalanced
         
        01-04-2011, 10:51 AM
      #29
    Trained
    On the mineral block front, I can buy a 50 lb block for like, $5. They aren't that expensive. =]

    Good to know on the alfalfa = lower sugar. What with Ricci's possibility of a mild laminitic/founder episode, I was worried about feeding alfalfa. I changed her grain from Safechoice to Timothy pellets, was that a smart move? Or a lateral move? Sorry to hijack, Wallaby. =\
         
        01-04-2011, 10:54 AM
      #30
    Started
    "SLOW FEEDER" - 7'X10' ORANGE POLY NET, USED FISH NET - eBay (item 270668050623 end time Jan-21-11 13:09:48 PST)

    It's not just about the NSC ... my chorinic lamitis mare gets a vitamin/mineral supplement with added amino acids. Remission and MSM with timothy pellets and grass hay
         

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