So the equine dentist told me something interesting today... - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 23 Old 10-27-2012, 02:58 PM
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Older horses don't process protein as well as the younger ones. Senior feed is still a good option and it provides everything a senior horse needs, beet pulp, extra oils, probiotics, etc. It is a complete feed altho most horses still love their hay and it's safe to continue feeding hay and his alfalfa.
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post #12 of 23 Old 10-27-2012, 03:13 PM
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If your horse is showing the beginning signs of Cushings, sweet feed would definitely be a bad choice.

Triple Crown also makes a feed specifically for IR/Cushings horses.
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post #13 of 23 Old 10-27-2012, 03:47 PM
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he doestn' look 24, I mean judgeing from his skull. Uusally horses at that age have pretty sunken areas above the eye socket.
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post #14 of 23 Old 10-27-2012, 05:00 PM
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This happened to a lady I know she was told the horse was 8 then when the vet came out and looked her over he said she was closer to 24.

I personally don't like sweet feed, I kind of consider it to be like candy for horses. I use senior feed, beet pulp and 24/7hay.

Your horse is very pretty and looks good. It's not fair when people aren't honest about the horse they sell you, although your horse got a lucky break.
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post #15 of 23 Old 10-27-2012, 06:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chandra1313 View Post
...
I personally don't like sweet feed, I kind of consider it to be like candy for horses. I use senior feed, beet pulp and 24/7hay.

Your horse is very pretty and looks good. It's not fair when people aren't honest about the horse they sell you, although your horse got a lucky break.
I most certainly second those thoughts.

The seniors feed I used to use was Nutrena Senior Feed plus soaked beet pulp, 2nd cut alfalfa and free choice grass hay. I had good success with this diet.
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post #16 of 23 Old 10-28-2012, 08:05 AM Thread Starter
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Alright thanks everyone! His weight is the best now that I've ever had him at. If I were to keep him on the TC Sr, how much weight of feed each meal would be ideal?

We do not know for sure he is cushinoid, its just been a thought of the vet because of his slightly longer/thicker coat that takes a little more to shed out. But at the same time, if he really is 24 maybe that is solely why??

I will look into Nutrena. Not sure if we have it local but I've heard about it and need to see if its around here.

Over the winter without much grass we do keep the big round bales of hay around.for the horses. Hunter just also gets alfalfa as a treat a few days a week, but it has greatly helped his weight and energy level.

Last edited by amp23; 10-28-2012 at 08:11 AM.
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post #17 of 23 Old 10-29-2012, 12:13 PM
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I think TC Senior is a good choice- even though it's technically a sweet feed because it has added molasses, it's NSC is still very low (11.7%), lower than even their Low Starch (13.5%) formula.

As for how much, I'd start with their suggestion for horses that are still able to eat hay: "Begin with approximately 6 pounds of Triple Crown Senior per day and then adjust up or down as needed after 2 to 4 weeks in order to maintain desired body condition. Do not feed more than 5 pounds of Triple Crown Senior at a single meal."
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post #18 of 23 Old 10-29-2012, 03:58 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you!

Currently he is hardly eating :( he's been on bute to help with pain and I've made his food as soft as possible with water but he's barely picking at that and his alfalfa. The grass hay is still too course for him to eat. I've called the dentist but he's busy so I left a message asking for advice on what to try... do y'all have any suggestions?

Please send dome jingles his way.. he's pretty uncomfortable right now :(
And to top it off, its crazy windy here right now from Sandy. It went from 80 and sunny and hot to 60 and super windy and chilly :(
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post #19 of 23 Old 10-29-2012, 04:40 PM
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I'd soak it, I would probably go as far as to cut it up and soak it, beet shreds if you soak it for 30 mins gets really soft.
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post #20 of 23 Old 10-29-2012, 06:33 PM Thread Starter
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I have soaked some and he chose the dry alfalfa over the soaked. He is beginning to pick at the regular hay again, but he can't take big bite fulls :/
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