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soybean hay for horses?

This is a discussion on soybean hay for horses? within the Horse Nutrition forums, part of the Horse Health category
  • Soybean hay for horses?
  • Can horses eat soy bean hay

 
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    09-16-2011, 06:18 AM
  #11
Foal
Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by waresbear    
You all don't have hay auctions down in the states? In this area, (although I have an excellent local supplier who delivers & stacks it my barn), the truckers go to hay auctions & buy liner loads & sell it locally. Most of it comes from out of province. So if BC for instance has a hay shortage, usually means the prairie provinces have a bumper crop, so it's trucked in & reasonably priced. Vice versa for BC's hay crop this season, we had a wet spring & summer so hay is abundant.
yea we have hay auctions. But as winter goes on hay is going to get higher. Alot of hay is being trucked to texas and oklahoma.
     
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    09-16-2011, 08:07 AM
  #12
Showing
I'm in IN as well Greg, we just got our 3rd cuttings in last week. Those that had problems around here were from the excess rain in the spring and fields sitting in standing water.

I'm fortunate that our hay fields are on slightly higher, tiled ground. You might look into the auction at Veedersburg tomorrow night, they do have hay run through on occasion.
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    09-16-2011, 10:29 AM
  #13
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk    
Don't send it to where they do testing for cow hay - they test for different things with cows.

I use Equi-analytical but I know there are other labs -
YEP! Equi-Analytical knows about testing for horses but those crazy people at Dairy One that test hay for cattle will mess you up for sure. You watch them people!

Dairy One
730 Warren Road
Ithaca, NY 14850-1242
(607) 257-1272

Equi analytical.
730 Warren Road
Ithaca, NY 14850 USA

Im sure their marketing people are laughing all the way to the bank.
     
    09-16-2011, 02:16 PM
  #14
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Production Acres    
YEP! Equi-Analytical knows about testing for horses but those crazy people at Dairy One that test hay for cattle will mess you up for sure. You watch them people!

Dairy One
730 Warren Road
Ithaca, NY 14850-1242
(607) 257-1272

Equi analytical.
730 Warren Road
Ithaca, NY 14850 USA

Im sure their marketing people are laughing all the way to the bank.
You sure do like to dig every chance you get if the things aren't exactly spelled out by people who, for whatever reason you have fabricated, you choose not to like.

I am not even going to bother to explain about the people that "only test cow hay" and why I made that comment, since you already know it all and would much rather make feeble attempts at berating anyone that doesn't "fit" in your Internet Forum Clique.

You alleged to have known it all when you commented on the other forum that my horses weren't smart enough to know the difference between grasses when all I meant was they didn't like the taste.

You had to try and show-out but anyone with common sense should know what I was talking about.

You raise good quality hay and you should be proud of that. It does not give you The Right of Arrogance to berate and attempt to put people in their place, who are trying to help others. In my world people like you are referred to as "Legends in their own minds". You might know a lot but don't ever think you know it all---------------------

If you've got more to say, by all means PM me and we will continue this tete-a-tete off-screen; I'm sure you know what that means since you are The Most Knowledgeable Person of Them All on these forums and make no bones about it
     
    09-16-2011, 02:52 PM
  #15
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk    
You

We use Dairy One exculisively! They are a very professional company. They are very quick. Their results are not questioned. I think it is a genius of an idea that they had to form a pseudo-company called Equi-Analytical to market to horse people.

The idea that a test for RFV on a Dairy One sample would be different than the RFV test on a Equi-Analytical sample is a farce. Thusly, Protein is protein is protein! This is a common misconception that some horse people mention to me at least once a month.

Yes, I do not enjoy people perpetuating half-truths. If you notice, I do not comment on people's riding style, the anticipated new color of their colts, whether half chaps are allowed in english country pleasure shows, etc. I comment on hay, forage, basic feed, facilities, and trucks and trailers. I know more about forage than almost any vet in the country. We handle 10,000+ tons of forage, 12 different species of hay, 4 difffernt cuttings of hay, hay out of 15 different states.
     
    09-16-2011, 05:45 PM
  #16
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Production Acres    
We use Dairy One exculisively! They are a very professional company. They are very quick. Their results are not questioned. I think it is a genius of an idea that they had to form a pseudo-company called Equi-Analytical to market to horse people.

The idea that a test for RFV on a Dairy One sample would be different than the RFV test on a Equi-Analytical sample is a farce. Thusly, Protein is protein is protein! This is a common misconception that some horse people mention to me at least once a month.

Yes, I do not enjoy people perpetuating half-truths. If you notice, I do not comment on people's riding style, the anticipated new color of their colts, whether half chaps are allowed in english country pleasure shows, etc. I comment on hay, forage, basic feed, facilities, and trucks and trailers. I know more about forage than almost any vet in the country. We handle 10,000+ tons of forage, 12 different species of hay, 4 difffernt cuttings of hay, hay out of 15 different states.
I'll believe that but, if that is the case why, in Summer, 2007 when I posted hay test results that I had my local Co-op send out to THEIR lab for testing was the comment made on the other forum to the effect that "---the test results were based on feeding cows---". That quote is only to encircle the generalized statement because I sure can't remember exact verbiage back to 2007.

When I went back to the Co-op store, talked eyeball-to-eyeball to them and asked point blank if that hay was tested for "XYZ Values" for horses, their reply to me was (again not the exact verbiage) "--no; our lab tests hay for cows; what you are asking for is something they don't do, you will have to find someone else for that kind of testing--"

Those two things are why I made the comment I made to the OP of this thread.

That all being said, I have had the greatest of faith in the test results of Equi-Analytical until recently. When the sample test results came back from the Univ of MN where three of my horses were enrolled in their metabolic study program (two with metabolic issues, the third was the Control Horse), the hay samples tested at a bit over 13% NSC.

I buy by the season and since I only have four horse, all my hay comes out of the same field and the same cutting. When I had sent the hay in for testing after it had sat in my barn for a month, the NSC value came back at around 9.6% NSC.

Imagine my surprise, as I read the Univ of MN report that the forage samples had been tested by an outside source and that source was Equi-Analytical. I expected to see a disparity in test results but that is a huge disparity that needs challenged, given my hay-buying routine.

It also grieved me when I went all over this 22 acres to gather grass samples, paying strict attention to the rules, and my grass only tested at 8.5% NSC. If that's the case why on earth do I have two metabolic horses when no one gets grain and they only eat mixed grass hay at night? After reading the big variance on my hay, it has made me doubt the accuracy of the pasture grass reading. I'd've bought into the results had they been reversed.

Still I recommend them and I don't want to give up them. This reminds me that I need to fire off an e-mail to whomever's name I have from Dairy One back when I bought the core sampler. Thanks for that

I also stay out of the half chaps, horse colors, tie colors to match the shirt but, on occasion, can only sit on my hands for so long until I feel like I have to defend my Walking Horses, what bits I use (or not), and the fact that I have never had a riding "style". I have not only ridden more horses literally sitting on their butts to get down a slippery slope ending in a river than most folks, I have done it bareback my entire life. I really do know how to ride a horse and what it takes to keep them gentled and willing to slide that butt into a river, knee-dig up the other side, and stand proud at what they just accomplished. In 50-some years of riding, I have never once lamed or sored a horse either. Any lameness was done by their own foolishness in the pasture or in the stall.

I honestly always appreciate when I am corrected because I do NOT like to give misinformation to folks -- especially where the health of their horses are concerned. Having to study nutrition to this great detail is new to me since my first horse developed metabolic issues in 2007; I am still learning. I really would appreciate if your fingers typed in a little more gentle direction if I have inadvertently gotten someone off track where the health of their horse is concerned
     
    09-17-2011, 10:35 AM
  #17
Weanling
You can have sugar levels vary by that much depending on the time of day that you harvested the sample - for example - if I cut samples of a pasture at 8am, 1pm, and at 7pm, you will have drastically different sugar levels. The only way you can have a test replicated on #'s is if you take a large sample, mix it throughly, and then have it sampled. Now, once again, almost all labs use NIFR testing or near infared spectometery. Which means they take a picture of the hay and a computer analyses the hay based on other pictures in the database to give a #. These pictures are calibrated with wet chemistry, but unless you pay to have a wet test done, your #'s will never be 100% accurate.

Your Co-oP doesn't know what they are talking about. Now what they might have been trying to say and just did not know better is that they paid for a basic test that included TDN, Protein, and one or two other things. They were too cheap or too ignorant to buy a test that would show the sugar levels or the rfv, or the "horse calories/lb", etc. Now that having been said many of the samples we recieve from producers are very limited in scope. That does not mean the sample was for cattle, that means the producer paid for a cheap test - or the basic test - however you want to look at it.
     

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