strange hay eating behavior.... - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 19 Old 05-12-2011, 09:34 PM
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I feed timothy and I find the horses will do the same, root for the blossoms. I use the small mesh hay nets and it prevents this problem as no refilled net appears until the other is pretty much empty. What might be in the net is pretty course hay but seldom more than a handful.
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post #12 of 19 Old 05-12-2011, 10:37 PM
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Beau and Epona BOTH do the same thing....and their teeth were floated in July of last year.

They seem to know what they are looking for as they root to the bottom of the hay pile...
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post #13 of 19 Old 05-13-2011, 11:57 AM
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Originally Posted by patterson81 View Post
I have been feeding her bahai hay, perhaps bermuda is tastier?? I definitely think being fussy is a factor! I need to change her name to Sassy, because she truly is
these hay types are well known for low rfv and thus high ndf. This is what causes them to colic horses so easily. The high ndf causes slow digestion in the hind gut and thus you get impactions.
Hay in the 90+ rfv will get eaten almost in its intirety.
Hay in the 80+ rfv will eat good and will mostly get cleaned up
Hay <80 will be sorted bad and used as bedding
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post #14 of 19 Old 05-13-2011, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Production Acres View Post
these hay types are well known for low rfv and thus high ndf. This is what causes them to colic horses so easily. The high ndf causes slow digestion in the hind gut and thus you get impactions.
Hay in the 90+ rfv will get eaten almost in its intirety.
Hay in the 80+ rfv will eat good and will mostly get cleaned up
Hay <80 will be sorted bad and used as bedding
Production Acres people might understand this post better if you told them what rfv and ndf meant.
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post #15 of 19 Old 05-13-2011, 03:01 PM
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If you purchase hay - you should know what these numbers mean. It amazes me how many supplements, various and sundry concoctions, - un-natural feedstuffs (kelp, coconut oil, beet pulp, corn oil, etc.) are pushed and people don't even know their basic's on hay analysis.

RFV is relative feed value - a number used by the industry to correlate the total digestible nutrients, protein, acid deterigent fiber, etc into one number that can be used across various hay types and sources.

NDF is neutral detergient fiber - a number that indicates the amount of liginin in the cell wall structure of the plants - or to put it in layman's terms, the stemminess or woodiness of the plant. As in the case of bermudagrass, this is not always as noticable as an overmature timothy.
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post #16 of 19 Old 05-13-2011, 03:02 PM
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Lots of people board, etc so they do not buy hay.

It never hurts to include the whole word in situations like this if you are actually trying to be helpful.
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post #17 of 19 Old 05-20-2011, 06:31 PM
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Originally Posted by patterson81 View Post
This might be a silly question, BUT, I am going to ask it anyway...

When I put hay out for my horse, she noses down into the feeder and will only eat the hay at the bottom, she tosses out the hay at the top, and the end result is 50% of the hay is all over the ground...and she will not eat it.... any thoughts on this????
My horse does the exact same thing. Although she does end up eating the rest of it, I believe. (There are two horses there, so it is not easy to tell.)

My horse has devoured a bale of hay, drilling a hole right through the center then practically convering it back up with the excess. It looked like a normal bale, and when I sat on top of it, I fell all the way in. XD I think it is just normal. Not every horse does it, but I've seen it before. Perhaps it is just a mare thing.

If she is not eating it, I'd suggest just piling it back up untill she does. Or keeping it in a place that keeps it composed even if she destroys it.
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post #18 of 19 Old 05-20-2011, 06:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Production Acres View Post
If you purchase hay - you should know what these numbers mean. It amazes me how many supplements, various and sundry concoctions, - un-natural feedstuffs (kelp, coconut oil, beet pulp, corn oil, etc.) are pushed and people don't even know their basic's on hay analysis.
We rarely buy hay, and have always made out own. I doubt we have ever tested out hay for nutrients either.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alwaysbehind View Post
Lots of people board, etc so they do not buy hay.

It never hurts to include the whole word in situations like this if you are actually trying to be helpful.
I have to agree with this, because I had no clue what you were talking about.

It is impossible for a man to learn what he thinks he already knows. --Epictetus
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post #19 of 19 Old 05-21-2011, 10:55 AM
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Originally Posted by ButtInTheDirt View Post
My horse has devoured a bale of hay, drilling a hole right through the center then practically convering it back up with the excess. It looked like a normal bale, and when I sat on top of it, I fell all the way in

That is just too funny!!! Wish someone had taken a video of that!!




I don't think it's a mare thing, though....our OTTB gelding does it EVERY time he eats. If we feed them their flakes intact, he and Epona will drill holes right through them. If we tear their flakes up, they throw the piles to the side and eat what is left behind. They DO eventually eat the rest....j.when hunger takes over.
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