Is a very small amount of basic sweet feed okay? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum

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post #11 of 20 Old 02-21-2013, 09:17 PM
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Well, it looks like a little splash of sweet feed is your best option in this scenario.
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post #12 of 20 Old 02-21-2013, 09:19 PM
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So all three are fed loose in the same pasture? Not that that's necessary a bad thing, just wondering. And that info would really help you get good tips. What supplements are you adding? Or adding for?
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post #13 of 20 Old 02-22-2013, 11:21 AM Thread Starter
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Yes, sorry, they're all fed loose. I'll ask my BO if she supervises the whole time. I think she does because my mare is the alpha and will chase the others off their feed even if she doesnt eat it. And I will be adding a calming supplement and MSM. I was going to add a multi vitamin but I don't think she needs it.
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post #14 of 20 Old 02-27-2013, 07:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taffy Clayton View Post
I have fed Purina Omolene 100 for 30 years, and not one of my horses has ever died because of it.

They are healthy and happy.
The latest studies show that diets high in NSC are quite unhealthy for equine digestive systems. They have also shown to cause a number of health issues such as IR, founder, laminitis, ulcers, hindgut acidosis, colic, unhealthy hooves, etc ect ect.

I will never understand why people stay stuck in their ways instead of doing the research and adjusting their feed programs for a healthier result/animal.

Anyways.... OP: No, a handful or two wont hurt her. It's when you feed lbs of it that it can/does have negative effects.

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post #15 of 20 Old 02-28-2013, 02:15 PM
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Originally Posted by OneFastHorse View Post
The latest studies show that diets high in NSC are quite unhealthy for equine digestive systems. They have also shown to cause a number of health issues such as IR, founder, laminitis, ulcers, hindgut acidosis, colic, unhealthy hooves, etc ect ect.

I will never understand why people stay stuck in their ways instead of doing the research and adjusting their feed programs for a healthier result/animal.
Interesting that I have never had any problems with the above mentioned abnormalities or conditions, in all my "stuck" in years of feeding the same proven feed. Further interesting that you know how unhealthy all my horses are.
It is amazing after all this time I have any horses still sound and alive.

I acquiesce to the national companies that spend millions of dollars on equine nutrition research, instead of reading a few articles on the internet and following the latest trends.
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post #16 of 20 Old 02-28-2013, 03:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Phly View Post
Picky usually means she has an option. Take the option away and she'll eat it. What I mean is she will eat it when she gets hungry. Not sure how you feed but, we feed tied and in pans. If they won't eat their grain cause if a supplement, that's fine. They'll get the same exact pan of feed tomorrow. They quit being picky real fast. Safe choice is pretty dry. A spray bottle would dampen it enough and not make it mush. I could see that working well
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The problem is that a horse that only gets a little feed is never going to be hungry going without it. One of our mares will not eat her feed if you put any powder stuff in with it. She has free choice hay and pasture, is not a picky eater, and will eat any type of grain/pellet/hay, but will walk away if it has any powder on it. Just the way she is.
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post #17 of 20 Old 02-28-2013, 03:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taffy Clayton View Post
Interesting that I have never had any problems with the above mentioned abnormalities or conditions, in all my "stuck" in years of feeding the same proven feed. Further interesting that you know how unhealthy all my horses are.
It is amazing after all this time I have any horses still sound and alive.

I acquiesce to the national companies that spend millions of dollars on equine nutrition research, instead of reading a few articles on the internet and following the latest trends.
We've always fed sweet feed with no ill effects. I had never even heard of sweet feet being bad for horses until coming to online forums. My grandmother will not under any circumstances change her ways. I have tried multiple times. So basically until I get my own property I am stuck feeding her way. My shetland has been on the same feed for 17 years. She's the healthiest of all of our horses, and the oldest.
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post #18 of 20 Old 02-28-2013, 03:48 PM
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I wish I could find the picture now that I saw a few years ago of the comparison between the intestines of a horse that had a forage diet consisting of grass and hay his whole life and a horse that was fed a great deal of grain and sweet feed throughout his life. It was like looking at the lungs of a smoker vs the lungs of a non-smoker.
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post #19 of 20 Old 02-28-2013, 04:21 PM
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Our horses get mostly grass hay with a little alfalfa and no more than 5 lbs(split into 2-3 feedings) of feed a day. We rarely have any colic episodes, nobody has ulcers, and everybody's as happy and healthy as can be. You would think that my shetland would be showing signs of ulcers, being IR, EMS, ANYTHING if she wasn't healthy, don't you? As I said, I will be changing their diet to pasture when I get my own property, but right now this is what is available.
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post #20 of 20 Old 02-28-2013, 05:57 PM
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OP, another idea would be a few handfuls of Purina Equine Senior. It tends to be a little 'sticky' like the sweet feed and is highly palatable, but with not so much sugar or other icky things in it that we don't want our horses to have. It worked just fine to give our old QH mare her MSM in every day, and she never hesitated to eat it. Might cost more than a handful of sweet feed though.

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