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dressage arena is finally under way!

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  • The base of a dressage arena in australia
  • Do you need borders on a sand dressage arena

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    02-07-2012, 06:09 PM
  #21
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Allison Finch    
I wouldn't take the clay out and put topsoil in. The top soil will not make a good base. Anything you put on it will mix in. Here are some ideas;

Sub-Base
The consistency of the soil plays a big part in the sub-base at the foundation of your arena. Scientists have identified more than 10,000 different kinds of soil; sandy soils are vulnerable to runoff, while clay-based soils are more stable and harder. Your sub-base should have a slight crown at its center, or be rolled with a 1-to-2- percent grade to allow for runoff.

Base
The base is laid directly on top of the sub-base, just beneath the footing itself. It's often composed of crushed stone, then rolled flat and sealed with chip and seal (the same process used to construct rural roads).

Arena Design
The footing material you choose should be loose, and provide good drainage. If you plan to surround your arena with sod, it's a good idea to line the base and footing area with a pressure-treated board. This keeps the base from shifting under the constant weight of the horses plodding along the rail. Another option is to extend your base and footing beyond your rail or fence. A 20-foot walk track on the outside of your arena provides a cushion for the shifting of the base and footing. The arena's design will impact your footing depth. If you choose the board option, make the footing 2 to 4 inches thick, while an arena with a 20-foot walk track should have footing 3 to 6 inches thick.

Sand Footing
Sand deeper than 6 inches can be dangerous for your horses' tendons. Sand breaks down and compacts over time, so start with a 2-inch depth and be prepared to add material regularly over time (ideally in one-half inch increments). Sand also has a tendency to dry out. Products such as Arena RX (available from Midwest Industrial Supply) coat the particles and reduce or eliminate dust.

Rubber Footing
Rubber does not degrade, and its dark color reduces surface glare on a sunny day. It also absorbs the heat from the sun, keeping the footing thawed on a sunny winter day. Mixing rubber with sand retains these benefits while keeping the footing from becoming too hot. Add 2 pounds of rubber per square foot of sand. The rubber will float in heavy rain; reintegrate it into the sand by dragging the arena with a flat board so as not to damage your carefully prepared base. Buy rubber footing from a horse footing supplier to avoid footing with remaining metal or other foreign materials that may injure your horse.

Topsoil Footing
Although topsoil may seem inexpensive at first, maintaining it is very time consuming. Soil dries out very easily, creating severe dust problems. Soil containing a large percentage of clay is slippery in the rain, and will dry to a very hard surface. In addition, some soils do not drain well, remaining wet for long periods of time. The problem of drainage can be mitigated by adding more than 50 percent sand to the topsoil, but it still needs to be disked daily to maintain a pleasant riding surface.
thanks I will take that into consideration!!
     
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    02-07-2012, 06:19 PM
  #22
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golden Horse    
This is as far as we got with it last year, a flat (ish) area roped off. Fine in the dry, but can't ride in it at all when wet as our 'soil' just turns to a slime which is lethally slippery



I'm hoping to move to one of the old cow pens this year, with a better surface, and enclosed.
Awe, that is still awesome! We have 10 acres, and all of it is hilly, and forest. Their is NO chunck on our property that looks like that, haha.
     
    02-07-2012, 07:00 PM
  #23
Trained
Great start, that was the easy cheap part. You still have a lot of work left. Keep posting updated pix. I built a riding arena when we built the horse. Never worked so hard in life, digging post holes, picking rocks, shoveling sand, but in the end, it's worth it. I still have to paint the white rails every 2nd year.
     
    02-08-2012, 12:00 AM
  #24
Started
^lol hah the rocks is the worst
     
    02-08-2012, 12:03 AM
  #25
Green Broke
I am green with envy!!
     
    02-09-2012, 12:13 PM
  #26
Green Broke
I want to add that if you are putting posts in buy an AUGER instead of the "slam down and pull apart" post hole digger. I used my auger every year to dig holes EVERYWHERE. The 2 last times were to put a supporting recycled 8' (8" diameter) post 3 foot deep in my shelter (for the new manger) last November. I also had to replace a protective post in front of my barn's loft. I bought hay from this guy who backed into it and broke the post with his trailer. )=/
FINALLY replaced it last month and I dug through gravel and dirt with my auger. It looks like a giant corkscrew and has two handles at the top. You can adjust the width at the bottom. You must dig a shallow hole with a spade to start, then you just keep turning until it's full, pull it out and empty and keep working at it until you reach the desired depth.
I also garden with my auger. Couldn't do my farm maintenance without it. =D
     
    02-09-2012, 12:23 PM
  #27
Green Broke
Has anyone used rubber in HIGH wind areas?

The place I board used 2" of sand and in less than a year needed to replace all of it, as it blew away. 70mph winds are "normal" around here, when my run-ins were put in the guy sunk 8ft pieces of rebar to anchor them and told me if they came loose, he'd come back with 12ft pieces!

I'd like to bring my horse home but need to build an arena first. It's very, very dry here so I was considering rubber but not if all the expensive rubber is going to blow away the first time the wind blows!
     
    02-09-2012, 02:34 PM
  #28
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corporal    
I want to add that if you are putting posts in buy an AUGER instead of the "slam down and pull apart" post hole digger. I used my auger every year to dig holes EVERYWHERE. The 2 last times were to put a supporting recycled 8' (8" diameter) post 3 foot deep in my shelter (for the new manger) last November. I also had to replace a protective post in front of my barn's loft. I bought hay from this guy who backed into it and broke the post with his trailer. )=/
FINALLY replaced it last month and I dug through gravel and dirt with my auger. It looks like a giant corkscrew and has two handles at the top. You can adjust the width at the bottom. You must dig a shallow hole with a spade to start, then you just keep turning until it's full, pull it out and empty and keep working at it until you reach the desired depth.
I also garden with my auger. Couldn't do my farm maintenance without it. =D
i have never heard of it. Can you buy them in australia? Price
     
    02-09-2012, 02:37 PM
  #29
Green Broke
Looks like this~
http://www.archway-engineering.com/i...hand_auger.jpg
     
    02-15-2012, 03:28 AM
  #30
Trained
Hope you know that this means that I will be over all the time to train wiith you!

Id kill for an arena (my have one soon) cos my rope one has gone :( Sad yes and not the best solution for an arena but it was all I could get!
     

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