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post #31 of 51 Old 08-15-2013, 08:08 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Montana - Estados Unidos De Americana
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Does anyone know would treated 2x6'es be appropriate for building a corral?

BLM says in order to get a horse you have to have a corral that is a minimum 20x20, at 6' high per horse. If I was going to get both id need a 20x40 basically.

I was thinking use 6x6 posts, on 10' centers, then run 2x6'es up that and space them 5 1/2" apart. Not sure if this would be enough or not?

"Don't just teach your children to read, teach them to question what they read, teach them to question everything" - George Carlin
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post #32 of 51 Old 08-15-2013, 11:23 PM
Foal
 
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Location: Bloomfield, NM
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I believe you do not want to use treated lumber in case the horses chew on the wood....its toxic. I know you shouldn't be using them for raised garden beds as the chemicals leach into the soil, so direct injestion would be worse. Probably cedar as its more resistant to rot. I am sure someone whom knows for sure will chime in soon.
Sounds like you have made up your mind:)
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post #33 of 51 Old 08-15-2013, 11:30 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Higgins, TX. YeeHaw!!
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I'm not 100% sure about what they require as far as wood fencing goes, when I applied for my adoption authorization, I had the 6' pipe panels.

If you're wondering, it never hurts to either call or e-mail and ask. They can tell you if that's okay and, if it's not, some other options.

There are some really nice looking 'stangs out there. They may not be "pretty" in the quarter horse sense of the word, but they're sturdy enough that they can be used hard for decades and never break down.

Just because I love my boy.... I've had him for almost 9 years now and wouldn't take any amount of money for him.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
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post #34 of 51 Old 08-15-2013, 11:41 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: south of nowhere, north of nothing
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DOBE!!!!! *grabby hands*

I don't know what you have in mind OP/ but my friend used to get stangs all the time and they had a completely enclosed corral for them. No cracks no way to see in or out. She figured it made it easer I guess. People have ALL different kinds of set ups for them.
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post #35 of 51 Old 08-16-2013, 12:31 AM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
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Location: Montana - Estados Unidos De Americana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs View Post
I'm not 100% sure about what they require as far as wood fencing goes, when I applied for my adoption authorization, I had the 6' pipe panels.

If you're wondering, it never hurts to either call or e-mail and ask. They can tell you if that's okay and, if it's not, some other options.

There are some really nice looking 'stangs out there. They may not be "pretty" in the quarter horse sense of the word, but they're sturdy enough that they can be used hard for decades and never break down.

Just because I love my boy.... I've had him for almost 9 years now and wouldn't take any amount of money for him.
That is a fine looking horse. How hard was he to break?
smrobs likes this.

"Don't just teach your children to read, teach them to question what they read, teach them to question everything" - George Carlin
My Journal: Montana horse adventures
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post #36 of 51 Old 08-16-2013, 12:32 AM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
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Location: Montana - Estados Unidos De Americana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roperchick View Post
DOBE!!!!! *grabby hands*

I don't know what you have in mind OP/ but my friend used to get stangs all the time and they had a completely enclosed corral for them. No cracks no way to see in or out. She figured it made it easer I guess. People have ALL different kinds of set ups for them.
I have actually heard it is better to expose them to everything you can, get em used to it.

I am sure there are several schools of thought there.
smrobs likes this.

"Don't just teach your children to read, teach them to question what they read, teach them to question everything" - George Carlin
My Journal: Montana horse adventures
BigNickMontana is offline  
post #37 of 51 Old 08-16-2013, 12:33 AM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Montana - Estados Unidos De Americana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roseann View Post
I believe you do not want to use treated lumber in case the horses chew on the wood....its toxic. I know you shouldn't be using them for raised garden beds as the chemicals leach into the soil, so direct injestion would be worse. Probably cedar as its more resistant to rot. I am sure someone whom knows for sure will chime in soon.
Sounds like you have made up your mind:)
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I am certainly exploring it.

"Don't just teach your children to read, teach them to question what they read, teach them to question everything" - George Carlin
My Journal: Montana horse adventures
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post #38 of 51 Old 08-16-2013, 12:33 AM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigNickMontana View Post
I have actually heard it is better to expose them to everything you can, get em used to it.

I am sure there are several schools of thought there.

That's what I figure too. But eh. I haven't trained one yet haha to each their own....


But seriously....you should get one......just saying.

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post #39 of 51 Old 08-16-2013, 12:41 AM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Montana - Estados Unidos De Americana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roperchick View Post
that's what I figure too. But eh. I haven't trained one yet haha to each their own....


But seriously....you should get one......just saying.
I just came in from figuring out how to put a heavier hitch on my motorhome so it can tow a horse trailer. ;)

I have a little Class B, great little rig, has a 460 and is a dually so it should tow the trailer no problem.



It is just that the hitch Champion put on em, it isn't very stout.

"Don't just teach your children to read, teach them to question what they read, teach them to question everything" - George Carlin
My Journal: Montana horse adventures
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post #40 of 51 Old 08-16-2013, 12:42 AM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Higgins, TX. YeeHaw!!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigNickMontana View Post
That is a fine looking horse. How hard was he to break?
Thank you .

He was relatively easy to get started. He was very spooky and hyper-reactive to everything at first and he had a bit of a charging issue (the folks that adopted him originally would go in the pen, he would pin his ears and charge, and they'd run away and leave him alone), but he is exceptionally smart and he wants to please.

BUT, when I got him, I'd already been training horses for about 8 years and I had a much more experienced trainer there to help me get him going to the point where I was comfortable taking him forward by myself.

OOH! Just to give you an idea on how they grow and mature when fed and worked. He was 3 when I got him, stood about 14.1 and probably didn't weigh 700 pounds. Now, he's standing 14.3 and pushing 1100 when I don't have him trimmed down from long days working.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roperchick View Post
I don't know what you have in mind OP/ but my friend used to get stangs all the time and they had a completely enclosed corral for them. No cracks no way to see in or out. She figured it made it easer I guess. People have ALL different kinds of set ups for them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigNickMontana View Post
I have actually heard it is better to expose them to everything you can, get em used to it.

I am sure there are several schools of thought there.
Personally, I prefer if they can see out from the very start. That way, they learn to ignore all the distractions and focus on me from day 1. Makes a blow-up or a freak-out a lot less likely the first time you take them out of the roundpen.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
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