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Gelding a horse at home.

This is a discussion on Gelding a horse at home. within the Horse Protection forums, part of the Horse Resources category

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        01-13-2014, 11:08 PM
      #41
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by COWCHICK77    
    An animal doesn't have to be freaking out to show pain, the signs can be much more subtle. The key is being able to read your animals.
    Regardless, you still don't know the pain threshold of these animals. Not to mention pain isn't a one size fits all deal. What's painful to me may be excruciating to another and not painful at all to another. Since horses cannot self report and they are darn good at hiding pain you really have no way to tell exactly how much pain they are in.
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        01-13-2014, 11:22 PM
      #42
    Green Broke
    Would it be signs like this!?

    Graphic! The absolutely horrible castration of hackney pony stallion Camo - YouTube

    The owner said, of the description was done by the real owner, that he had sedation, local and was twitched. You can't tell me the horse can tolerate the pain when you have to lay him down and hog tie him to do the procedure... or the them to a tree, stretch them out, whatever the mechanism of restraint is.

    IMO it part of the responsibility that goes along with owning a horse.
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        01-13-2014, 11:30 PM
      #43
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SlideStop    
    Regardless, you still don't know the pain threshold of these animals. Not to mention pain isn't a one size fits all deal. What's painful to me may be excruciating to another and not painful at all to another. Since horses cannot self report and they are darn good at hiding pain you really have no way to tell exactly how much pain they are in.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    I will agree that pain threshold is different between animals, some are more tolerant than others. But cattle and horses, as a whole, have a higher threshold than humans.

    Something to consider.... while it seems like a better idea to sedate everything, it just isn't practical in all situations. Like smrobs said, running something into a chute is more stressful then roping and laying it down whether to doctor, castrate, brand, vaccinate..etc. 5 minutes and its a done deal back to eating with roping. To run something into corrals, into a chute, medicate and doctor is more stressful, time consuming and keeping whatever animal it is from eating, being happy and pumping it with un-necessary medication.
    That is why we do what we do. If the animal doesn't thrive and do well we don't get paid and it is a reflection on our abilities. Poor abilities show in poor animal condition.

    Come look at our horse herd, we have 20+ year old ranch horses that look like horses half their age and making big circles.
    Look at how our calves do at the sale, we sent some four weights that brought well over $2 at the local sale, not a video sale....if you want to tack on sedation/painkillers on top that price can you imagine what your beef cost would be to you?
    smrobs, Stillstandin and boots like this.
         
        01-13-2014, 11:59 PM
      #44
    Green Broke
    I don't doubt for a second all your animals are happy and healthy. I believe you on that.

    And again, I don't have the solution to an effective, low cost, castration system. As for your everyday animals... I do not think there is any excuse to not make your animal comfortable.

    As for the pain, I really don't see how you can prove that. It only sounds like a way to justify why your doing a surgical procedure on a fully awake and alert animal.

    As for the restraint, I'm not really concerned how you do it, but the sheer fact that you need to restrain the animal means it's clearly something that causes the animal a decent amount of pain. Then to cause the pain and not aide in its relief... Seems a bit cruel.
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        01-14-2014, 12:27 AM
      #45
    Trained
    Using that same theory, haltering a horse to saddle it would be assuming it is in pain.
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        01-14-2014, 12:49 AM
      #46
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by COWCHICK77    
    Using that same theory, haltering a horse to saddle it would be assuming it is in pain.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Restraining a horse to perform a surgery while it's awake, and haltering to saddle are basically two different worlds. And cannot be compared.
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        01-14-2014, 01:16 AM
      #47
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rideordie112    
    Restraining a horse to perform a surgery while it's awake, and haltering to saddle are basically two different worlds. And cannot be compared.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    How's that?
    Haltering, hobbling, roping, tying, all are forms of restraint.
    So by that theory if you need to restrain a horse it must mean its in pain.
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        01-14-2014, 03:56 AM
      #48
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wyominggrandma    
    Banding bull calves, sheep, goats etc are considered cruel by some people, yet it is done daily on farms and ranches.
    Is it humane? No. I bet you check into your state laws, you will find out it is legal and people are allowed to do as they want with their own animals.
    Banding is a lot different then getting slashed up with a knife
         
        01-14-2014, 07:13 AM
      #49
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by COWCHICK77    
    How's that?
    Haltering, hobbling, roping, tying, all are forms of restraint.
    So by that theory if you need to restrain a horse it must mean its in pain.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Because is not the actually restraint causing the pain or mean it in pain. I've had to restrain horses for things way less painful. Shots, sheath cleaning, bandage cleaning, etc.
    I'd say horses who couldn't tolerate those "procedures" are the exception, not the rule. Not to mention its a pretty reasonable discomfort. Your going to put you child under general anesthesia for a hep B booster. But I bet if a doctor amputated an ear, finger, toe, etc, because they "don't want to pump so and so full of drugs" and "thought it would be fast this way" they'd probably find themselves in hot water.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    KigerQueen likes this.
         
        01-14-2014, 10:33 AM
      #50
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by churumbeque    
    Banding is a lot different then getting slashed up with a knife
    Excuse me, while I know you seem to think you know everything, I commented about banding because it is done everyday on ranches and farms and some consider it a way of daily ranch work with livestock.
    Horses to many are considered livestock and treat them as such for gelding, just like banding, removing horns, etc.
    Nowhere did I say anything about is being the same as gelding a horse without anesthetic.
         

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