My essay on Horse Slaughter - Page 5
 
 

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My essay on Horse Slaughter

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  • Essay on horsemeat
  • Causal essay over slaughtering horses

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    03-08-2012, 08:27 PM
  #41
Weanling
Thank-you :)
     
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    03-11-2012, 03:10 PM
  #42
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherie    
It is not an essay but a biased rant written by someone with an agenda. Much of it is inaccurate and is taken directly from the biased agenda of the animal rights nuts. Their real agenda is to stop ALL livestock, horse and pet ownership.

Fraudulent organizations like PETA, HSUS and ALF, that also frequently contain animal terrorists, have worked to spread the lies and half-truths that you are repeating.

I suggest that if you really want to write a credible paper that YOU actually research and look to other sources than the animal rights nuts with an agenda. Check the AVMA and the AAEP websites. They are licensed Veterinarians with no agenda other than to help animals and relieve suffering.

I also suggest that you personally contact a dozen 'country Vets'. These are the Veterinarians that practice out of small clinics in rural areas where they doctor large and small animals. They are NOT the big equine centers that doctor high-dollar show and race horses.

I HAVE visited with many of them. They ALL say that their horse business dropped off from 75% to 90% after the slaughter plants closed and horses lost their value. They will all tell you that cheaper horses get little or no Vet care now because horses are so cheap people will just let them die and replace them.

Look up slaughter numbers and prices during the last recession. In the late 80s, 350,000 horses were sent to slaughter per year. Another result of the 'supply and demand' cycle that is happening now. The only thing different then is that a fat slaughter horse was worth $900.00 to $1000.00 so people kept them fat and well-cared for and did not starve any of them to death.

So, if you want to write a paper, try actually researching it and get both sides of the story. Your paper now is getting both sides of the story from one side -- the animal rights activists biased and untruthful side.
Cherie, you talk about the original poster's piece containing information from the 'untruthful' side. Yet your post is rife with outright fabrications and paranoia.

To lump PETA, HSUS and ALF together is ludicrous. ALF does take animal rights to extreme measures. And PETA I'm no fan of, but HSUS is a mainstream organization, and your accusation that their 'real agenda is to stop ALL livestock, horse and pet ownership,' and that they 'frequently contain animal terrorists, have worked to spread the lies and half-truths,' is outright slander. This paranoia was created because of HSUS's work against puppy mills, factory farms, and yes, horse slaughter. I would direct people to for fact-based information that refutes these accusations: Myth: HSUS Wants to Outlaw Pets « HumaneWatch Info

In addition is your unproven assumption that moving horse slaughter plants (while continuing to sell the same # of American horses to slaughter) has been the cause of the drop in horse meat prices. I find it shocking that horse people are in denial of the effects of the largest economic downturn since the great depression. All luxury products - even homes - have lost up to 80% of their value, and you really think horses would be somehow immune?? What makes the horse situation even worse is that breeders continue breeding for the low (meat quality) end of the market. At least builders and producers of luxury products were smart enough to stop or severely curtail production.

The reality is the horse industry has no one to blame for the crash of the low end of the horse market but themselves. Horse prices are determined by an interplay of supply and demand... economics 101. Demand from slaughter has NOT changed one iota. It's demand from owners (the legitimate horse market) that has vanished and caused the problem, which is exacerbated by reckless stock horse breeding. And selling horses to slaughter - which has NEVER ceased to be an option for horse owners - only provides an incentive for further lottery-style breeding. Take away the cull option and the market will force people to breed responsibly, which will provide a LONG TERM solution to the equine neglect problem, that slaughter has significantly enabled.
     
    03-11-2012, 03:44 PM
  #43
Foal
Horses are not raised for food as a general rule and here are some articles that show why they should not end up as food!
Here is a link from the FDA regarding bute and its use in horses for meat. First a quote “We want to ensure that the public is never exposed to residues of this toxic drug.’
Phenylbutazone is known to induce blood dyscrasias, including aplastic anemia, leukopenia, agranulocytosis, thrombocytopenia and deaths. Hypersensitivity reactions of the serum-sickness type have also been reported. In addition, phenylbutazone is a carcinogen, as determined by the National Toxicology Program."
Here is the link FDA Order Prohibits Extra-label Use of Phenylbutazone
Next Quote-
‎"We performed a retrospective epidemiologic investigation of an unusual case of toxoplasmosis that occurred in March 1991. Patient 3, a 21-year-old pregnant woman living in the Nice area, was treated with spiramycine because routine serologic testing had shown T. Gondii parasite infection seroconversion at 22 weeks’ gestation. Amniocentesis showed T. Gondii tachyzoites in amniotic fluid by microscopic examination. At 26 weeks’ gestation, the woman underwent termination of pregnancy for ultrasonography-detected fetal severe abnormalities. Fetal necropsy showed numerous cerebral, cardiac, and hepatic abscesses with T. Gondii tachyzoites. A few days after pregnancy termination, the woman experienced cervical lymphadenopathy, which lasted 3 years. She reported having eaten raw horse meat regularly during her pregnancy."
Toxoplasmosis and Horse Meat, France - Vol. 17 No. 7 - July 2011 - Emerging Infectious Disease journ
Wwwnc.cdc.gov

Still think horse meat is safe- would you want your pregnant wife or daughter to eat it regularly during their pregnancy?
Ridernthestorm likes this.
     
    03-11-2012, 03:52 PM
  #44
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tabatha55    
Horses are not raised for food as a general rule and here are some articles that show why they should not end up as food!
Here is a link from the FDA regarding bute and its use in horses for meat. First a quote “We want to ensure that the public is never exposed to residues of this toxic drug.’
Phenylbutazone is known to induce blood dyscrasias, including aplastic anemia, leukopenia, agranulocytosis, thrombocytopenia and deaths. Hypersensitivity reactions of the serum-sickness type have also been reported. In addition, phenylbutazone is a carcinogen, as determined by the National Toxicology Program."
Here is the link FDA Order Prohibits Extra-label Use of Phenylbutazone
Next Quote-
‎"We performed a retrospective epidemiologic investigation of an unusual case of toxoplasmosis that occurred in March 1991. Patient 3, a 21-year-old pregnant woman living in the Nice area, was treated with spiramycine because routine serologic testing had shown T. Gondii parasite infection seroconversion at 22 weeks’ gestation. Amniocentesis showed T. Gondii tachyzoites in amniotic fluid by microscopic examination. At 26 weeks’ gestation, the woman underwent termination of pregnancy for ultrasonography-detected fetal severe abnormalities. Fetal necropsy showed numerous cerebral, cardiac, and hepatic abscesses with T. Gondii tachyzoites. A few days after pregnancy termination, the woman experienced cervical lymphadenopathy, which lasted 3 years. She reported having eaten raw horse meat regularly during her pregnancy."
Toxoplasmosis and Horse Meat, France - Vol. 17 No. 7 - July 2011 - Emerging Infectious Disease journ
wwwnc.cdc.gov
Still think horse meat is safe- would you want your pregnant wife or daughter to eat it regularly during their pregnancy?
First, eating raw meat at any point and particullarly during pregnancy is a very bad idea. Second, that is a report of anecdotal evidence. That is one women in one area of the world that had a parasitic infection from eating RAW meat. Horse meat is not any less safe than any other kind of raw meat.
MN Tigerstripes likes this.
     
    03-11-2012, 04:04 PM
  #45
Foal
Horse slaughter increases unwanted horses

Let’s address the whole ‘unwanted horses’ concept.

First, the ‘unwanted horses’ moniker was created – and heavily promoted – by slaughter proponents as justification for their grisly business. Its origins trace back to Tom Lenz, one of the most vocal and unapologetic horse slaughter pushers.

Second, the very existence of horse slaughter as an option actually creates ‘unwanted horses,’ as it provides incentive to breeders who utilize lottery style breeding, as a means to cut losses on their culls. So it increases unnecessary breeding. Slaughter is, in effect, a subsidy for irresponsible breeding (and bad business practices, but I digress).

Third, what is the definition of an ‘unwanted horse’? So far no definition has been provided, as it would provide an easy target to prove why slaughter doesn’t solve the problem. Here’s what I mean: horses that are starved or neglected – which most of us would probably classify as ‘unwanted’ – are not slaughter candidates. Horse slaughter is meat production, not a disposal service. Kill buyers seek young healthy animals in good weight. So slaughter doesn’t provide an outlet for neglected horses. It does provide an option for irresponsible breeders to dump their young, healthy culls.

And lastly, the very availability of horse slaughter is increasing equine neglect. We’ve already talked about how it increases unnecessary breeding. But it has also created legions of hoarders who are afraid of horses going to slaughter so they try to adopt and keep more than they can afford or handle. It is also increasing abandonment. When owners who abandon are caught, they express fear of sending their horses to auction where there are kill buyers. And then there are the kill buyers themselves, who are directly responsible for the abandonment of over 5,000 slaughter rejects in Texas, and neglect/starvation of feedlot horses in Presidio.

The bottom line is slaughter enables irresponsible breeding and ownership, and saying we need slaughter to control the unwanted horse population is as justifiable as saying we need dog fighting to control the pit bull population.
Ridernthestorm likes this.
     
    03-11-2012, 04:17 PM
  #46
Trained
1 - What else do you call a horse that no one wants? "Unwanted horse" sounds pretty accurate, and there are quite a few available for free where I live.

2 - The horses most likely to head for slaughter today are the ones bred in the 1990s - those ranging from 12-22. That is a huge part of the problem, because those breeding in 1992 don't know what the market will support in 2012 any more than we can predict the horse market in 2032. I doubt anyone is currently breeding, and saying, "I'll just get my money back by selling these horses for slaughter".

3 - Slaughter where? What would make anyone think slaughter in Mexico is preferable to slaughter inside the USA?
     
    03-11-2012, 05:03 PM
  #47
Banned
I am having trouble with the logic behind claiming horse slaughter encourages irresponsible lottery style breeding.

What is the current price per pound for horse meat? What does 1000# 3 year old fetch on the hoof at a slaugher house? $300.? $500.? I can't think of how anyone could possibly make money breeding horses for slaughter, or breed indiscriminately and have it make sense by sending the culls to slaughter.

My understanding of one of effects of closing US slaughterhouses was that it greatly increased transportation costs of getting the horses to market. So of that $300 - $500. On the hoof price (and that's my guess, I have no idea what the price actually is) more is eaten up in transportation and less is profit to the seller. I thought that was why horses are being bought for $25 - $100 to fill trailers heading for Mexico or Canada.

How can this possibly subsidize breeders?

Quote:
Here’s what I mean: horses that are starved or neglected – which most of us would probably classify as ‘unwanted’ – are not slaughter candidates.
I think this point reverses the cause and effect. Horses are starved and neglected in part because people can no longer afford to take care of them and they can't sell or rehome the horse. If you can no longer afford to keep your horse, but you can send it to the local livestock auction and get a 100 - 200 bucks for it, you chose that option before starvation and neglect. Second, if you remove the huge glut of grade horses from the bottom of the market, there might actually be a resale market for your average grade pleasure horse again. I would hate to be in a position to have to send a horse to a killer sale, but I would do it before I starved it, let it go without basic care, or abandoned it. I believe most responsible horse people would do the same.
Speed Racer likes this.
     
    03-11-2012, 05:13 PM
  #48
Super Moderator
Maybe it IS too easy for breeders to send the cast offs to slaughter. Maybe there should be some kind of excise tax put on each horse sold to slaughter, so that the seller must pay $100 , or $50, to some group which uses the money to support horse rescue. Makes the decision to sell for slaughter less attractive (not impossible, but less profitable) AND gives support for organizations that work to make horse slaughter irrelevant because all unwanted hroses will be "homed and wanted".
     
    03-11-2012, 06:12 PM
  #49
Trained
When horses are valuable as a commodity and can be sold at any time for 65 cents per pound or so then horses will not be standing around eating up moldy hay and living in filth up to thier hocks. Those people will haul the horse in to the auction and sell it for the $650. If the horse is ugly or ill mannered then it will go to a feedlot and then on to slaughter. If the horse is well trained, well conformed or otherwise desirable then I or someone just like me will buy the horse, clean it up, train it if needed and then resell it at a nice profit to a good home. When someone sees a horse rotting away in a field somewhere they may ask to buy it knowing that if it doesn't work out they won't be stuck with the horse forever. Bringing slaughter back to the US isn't going to increase the amount of GOOD horses going to slaughter. In fact, it will decrease the number by setting a higher base price and allowing some profit back in horses. I don't dare buy any young horses to train and turn over because I'm afraid I won't be able to sell them until they have literally eaten all of the profit and then some. Before the prices crashed and well before the economy went in the hole I would buy two or three horses at a time from the meat auction and turn them over in a couple of months. The horses gained value and were given a good home and I made a few bucks. Who's buying those horses now? There were several other guys doing the same thing but they don't do it anymore either for the same reason.
MacabreMikolaj likes this.
     
    03-11-2012, 09:36 PM
  #50
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
Maybe it IS too easy for breeders to send the cast offs to slaughter. Maybe there should be some kind of excise tax put on each horse sold to slaughter, so that the seller must pay $100 , or $50, to some group which uses the money to support horse rescue. Makes the decision to sell for slaughter less attractive (not impossible, but less profitable) AND gives support for organizations that work to make horse slaughter irrelevant because all unwanted hroses will be "homed and wanted".
IF I would ever send a horse I bred to slaughter,there would be a very good reason why I believe it should not be placed with someone else. Why then should I have to pay for someone else to rescue unfit horses?
kevinshorses likes this.
     

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