NJ feedlot horses
 
 

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NJ feedlot horses

This is a discussion on NJ feedlot horses within the Horse Protection forums, part of the Horse Resources category
  • Buying horse from feedlot rip off
  • Feedlot horses

 
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    10-29-2009, 09:27 PM
  #1
Foal
Exclamation NJ feedlot horses

I have a rehoming facility for unwanted and slaughterbound horses in PA. We go to the Camelot feedlot in NJ as often as possible to save horses from slaughter. I post info and pics of the available horses on our website as I get them to help them find homes or to raise funds so we can purchase them. Please take a look at our website www.muddycreekfarm.weebly.com and help if you're able to. I can give references if anyone is interested. We are not a 501(c)3 yet but we are working on the paperwork but until we are approved, donations are not tax deductible.
At this moment we are in desperate need of waterproof blankets sizes 72" to 81", and grain/hay/vet funds. We will be going back to the feedlot as soon as we can find homes for a few of our available horses (we are out of room).
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    10-30-2009, 01:10 AM
  #2
Foal
That's a shame because that horse is beautiful and it looks healthy.I would give you everything I could if I had any kind of money right now.
     
    10-30-2009, 02:28 PM
  #3
Foal
Ace

Quote:
Originally Posted by alli09    
that's a shame because that horse is beautiful and it looks healthy.I would give you everything I could if I had any kind of money right now.
Hi Alli,
That's Ace (the picture was taken at the feedlot right before we saved him), he was adopted by one of our volunteers as soon as he stepped off the trailer at home. He's such a great horse and you're right, he's perfectly healthy. Rides great (beginner safe). I think alot of people still think that it's the old, sick, "crazy" horses that go to slaughter and so far we've gotten 12 from there and they've all been healthy and ride fine, if of age (one was a 7 mo old Grulla draft cross colt who had groundwork done). What breed do you think Ace is? I know it's not a very good picture but if you can just take a guess. We were told QH and somedays that's what he looks like but other days he looks more like an english breed.
     
    10-30-2009, 02:49 PM
  #4
Foal
Did the vet tell you qh? He does look a little like it.and yeah, I learned a long time ago that it isn't just the sick, old and unwanted horses that go to slaughter, especially after seeing slaughter videos.Thank you for helping them.When I get my life together I am opening up a rescue facility after I get the money I need for one.
     
    10-30-2009, 03:06 PM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by alli09    
did the vet tell you qh? He does look a little like it.and yeah, I learned a long time ago that it isn't just the sick, old and unwanted horses that go to slaughter, especially after seeing slaughter videos.Thank you for helping them.When I get my life together I am opening up a rescue facility after I get the money I need for one.
No we normally tell the vet what breed they are lol. But all in all it doesn't matter because it wouldn't deter us from rescuing them. I will never understand what goes thru some people's minds when they sell a horse at Camelot because you know they have a very high chance of going into the feedlot. I've never ridden very many "well trained" horses so maybe this isn't too special but Ace won't pick up speed on a "kick" he will only pick up for constant leg pressure and the second you let off he drops right back to a walk, which is great for little kids since they aren't strong enough for the pressure he's trained to. I'm just amazed at how he wound up there. And we paid 350.00 for him! Luckily at Camelot it's very easy to save the horses as the owner has no problem selling to rescues, he's one of the only feedlot owners I'm aware of that will do that. Of course he gets a "crazy" every now and then that he won't sell even though they could be retrained by the right person and that breaks my heart, but if we save 20 and lose 1 I still think we are doing pretty good. Education is the key to saving these guys because slaughter will never stop until owners stop breeding them and selling them off at auction (I'm not against breeding, I just think people need to be more careful about it). I'm hoping one of these days we can win the lottery because there's so much more I want to give these horses and all the rest, but until then they will live big on a tiny farm ;) Good luck with starting your rescue, it's a ton of hard work but everytime you see the faces of everyone you've been able to help, it makes it all totally worthwhile (and you won't even mind all the cold days spent outside or trudging thru mud up to your knees - I hate this time of year haha). Well, I must go and start training. If you ever want to email me my email address is muddycreekfarm@gmail.com
     
    10-30-2009, 04:30 PM
  #6
Green Broke
I'm utterly confused. If there is nothing wrong with these horses, then why would someone opt to pay you $1,500 for a "decently" broke animal that you paid a couple hundred dollars for? Why not just GO to the feedlot themselves and pick one up?

The kind of overhead you're going to be making by rehoming horses at those prices puts you in a better position in this economy then most people into horses for FUN. Why exactly should I give my money to a non-registered self proclaimed rescue who's selling horses for twice what they're worth in today's economy?

I'm sorry if I sound rude, but I find it pretty petty to pull at peoples heart strings by calling yourself a rescue when you're selling a Thoroughbred gelding with TWO previously broken legs for $750. So, basically, this poor woman can't afford her beloved horse, so she GIVES him to you for FREE, and you're turning around and trying to charge someone $750 when even registered sound yearlings can't sell for that price?
     
    10-30-2009, 05:05 PM
  #7
Trained
Hmm..If this is the same Camelot I am thinking of, that's where I got my horse. It was actually a nice facility. There were horses that went to the KB, sure. But as far as auctions go, it was quite nice..

EDIT: Hmm...I didnt look at the website at first...I'm kind of wondering the same thing as Macabre?
     
    10-30-2009, 05:07 PM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by MacabreMikolaj    
I'm utterly confused. If there is nothing wrong with these horses, then why would someone opt to pay you $1,500 for a "decently" broke animal that you paid a couple hundred dollars for? Why not just GO to the feedlot themselves and pick one up?

The kind of overhead you're going to be making by rehoming horses at those prices puts you in a better position in this economy then most people into horses for FUN. Why exactly should I give my money to a non-registered self proclaimed rescue who's selling horses for twice what they're worth in today's economy?

I'm sorry if I sound rude, but I find it pretty petty to pull at peoples heart strings by calling yourself a rescue when you're selling a Thoroughbred gelding with TWO previously broken legs for $750. So, basically, this poor woman can't afford her beloved horse, so she GIVES him to you for FREE, and you're turning around and trying to charge someone $750 when even registered sound yearlings can't sell for that price?
We are registered as a nonprofit in the state of PA (you can search our full name - Muddy Creek Farms & Rehoming Facility for Unwanted Horses) and get that info. We are also doing our paperwork for federal nonprofit status. Ok think of it this way (no you're not being rude and neither am I when I answer your questions)... We buy one horse from Frank for 350.00 (some are less and some are more), it costs close to 50.00 in tolls to get there and back, plus 100.00 in gas (he is a 6 hr roundtrip from us), so if we only get one horse that brings the total up to 500.00 just to get him/her, then we normally have the horse for anywhere from 3 - 6 (sometimes over a year) until we find a suitable home for them, so that's 120-240 in hay, 192-384 in grain, 120 just for a vet check plus 35.00 for a coggins, and 32.00 for vaccines, 50.00 for their teeth to be floated, and nothing for their hooves because we are lucky enough to have a great farrier. So in the time they are normally here that brings the total up to 1049-1361. Now alot of our horses end up with adoption fees 500.00 and under by the time it's all said and done. Sometimes we lucky enough to be able to get a higher adoption fee which helps to support the other horses that are here. I truly wish people would go and buy them themselves! If that did that maybe we wouldn't be up to 18 horses. Our adoption fees are not by any means set in stone, but it depends on the person/facility/etc... Sometimes someone can easily afford the month to month care but not the up front cost of the horse, I have no problem working with these people. Trust me I'm not making a penny off of the rescue and that's not why I'm doing it. When I did our paperwork at the end of Oct we had 200.00 left (and the month isn't even over - I have to get hay tomorrow). I won't even go into what the costs are to have 18 horses here. I didn't come on here begging for donations, I am spreading the word about the feedlot, and if someone wants to donate great, if they don't want to or can't I completely understand. Some folks like us and some don't, but at the end of the day I put alot more into this rescue and these horses than most of the big ones do. We have a total of 2 full time volunteers (when they show up), 1 that comes on Fridays, my partner handles the financial paperwork, and my fiance` and I handle the feeding, training, barnwork, internet, computer records, grooming, etc. and he works full-time at another job so it's pretty much just me. As far as Gonzo goes, he rides great w/t/c has been cleared for all normal riding as well as hard trail riding (vet even said with a new set of xrays he may be able to jump - But we will not allow it), he has his papers, and the best temperment I've seen on a TB in a long time. Now will we get 750, probably not, but does it hurt to have his rehoming fee set at that while he's away for a 30 day refresher? No, not at all. So all in all I appreciate your questions and I hope that it hasn't only cleared it up for you but also other people who may have wondered the same thing. If anyone wants the phone number to the feedlot so you can save a horse, feel free to let me know.
     
    10-30-2009, 05:23 PM
  #9
Trained
Did you ever end up getting the 10 acres you mention trying to get a grant for on your website?
     
    10-30-2009, 05:31 PM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spastic_Dove    
Hmm..If this is the same Camelot I am thinking of, that's where I got my horse. It was actually a nice facility. There were horses that went to the KB, sure. But as far as auctions go, it was quite nice..
It's in Cranbury NJ. I've never been to the auction itself, we wait until we get the list of who's in the feedlot, and those are the ones we purchase from him. Some people have issues with this I'm sure since it's putting money in the kill buyer's hands, but he'd get that money with the horse dead or alive and I'd rather see it alive. We used to go to New Holland every couple of weeks (that's a nasty auction but still doesn't compaire to SugarCreek) but when you buy one there you are left to wonder if you hadn't bought them that maybe someone else with a good home would've, but by us getting them it closed a spot that another one could've had that may have needed it more. I think I put the wrong picture on my first post and gave some people the wrong idea of us, so if you don't mind I'm going to try to clear something up now since I'm already typing.. On our first trip to Camelot we went directly out back to look at some of the worst and he showed us "Hope" she was a TB who was so skinny you could see ribs, hip bones, backbone etc, and she was covered in manure burns. Frank said she had gained about 100lbs since he had her, but that nobody else would probably want her since she looked so bad. So of course she came home with us, as did a 2 yr old paint that he wasn't even going to tell us about because he wasn't broke (since when does that matter). Hope turned out to be Judge Carrie and records show she was a winner but that's all we've found so far. On the second trip we got Jack The Lad who is a very well known US bred Standardbred in the UK. I have gotten thanks from his previous owner as well as people involved with UK racing, on that same trip we got a black polo pony mare who followed Jack everywhere. Since those trips we have also gotten a 5 yr old QH gelding, 8 yr old chestnut QH gelding, Grey appy mare, dark brown young TB mare, a little camp pony, and a Draft X colt. I do not have the funds to take in ones with broken legs, etc.. (I hope someday to be able to), so yes I do have to look for ones that I feel will be able to rehome fairly quickly. Well, speaking of horses I have to head back out and continue cleaning stalls.
     

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