Alternative Methods of Pissing off the Haflinger - Page 4
 
 

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Alternative Methods of Pissing off the Haflinger

This is a discussion on Alternative Methods of Pissing off the Haflinger within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Pissing method
  • Haflinger lameness

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    11-10-2011, 08:57 AM
  #31
Super Moderator
Folks, let's chill a little bit.

The OP was using the "let's piss her off" figuratively, not literally. I was able to see that. I do not think she was really intentionally pissing her off, for goodness sake.

That said, this haffie needs to be taught her role in life. She is definitely wanting to be the boss in your relationship. If I were riding that horse, I would have a dressage whip in my hand and I would be ready to violate a rule I have about dressage whip (tap, not smack). Every time she did that behavior, I would give her ONE good whack. Just one correction for one violation of her part. It would sting!! If she reacted by doing it again, I would smack her again, every time. The minute she stopped and simply moved forward off my leg, I would PRAISE her mightily.

I also see some possible lameness, seen in her head bobbing. Mostly in the first video on the clockwise circle. At :16, at 1:04, for example. There are places where it is even more noticeable. You need to get her checked out as some of this behavior may be pain based.

If she checks out sound, I would take her on long fitness hacks as she is bordering on obese. I would do brisk trots on that fabulous dirt road you have. Brisk trot with few breaks. It will build fitness, which she seems lacking, and help lose weight.

Yes, people have been overly harsh in their criticism, here. For that I am sorry. Criticism CAN be made in a constructive and less belittling fashion. However, some feel frustrated if they feel their advice is being discounted.

Advice might not get discounted if it is made a bit more palatable and less defense building method.

Hope this helps a bit
     
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    11-10-2011, 10:01 AM
  #32
Banned
You have a couple of incorrect assumptions in your original post. First, the Haffie is not a trail horse. Second, she has not been "trained for trails". I raised and trained trailhorses for many years, and when trained they do not exhibit the behaviors your Haffie does, and certainly don't dump you and force you to walk back.

As I see it the issue is you are trying to accomplish some training objectives - what I would term intermediate training, but the Haffie hasn't yet completed her basic training. What she needs is to be taken back to square one and be trained properly one step at a time...you are trying to move her to jumping and trails when she doesn't even meet most people's definition of greenbroke.

You state you aren't interested in fixing her issues, but honestly she is not going to perform to your expectations unless those issues are addressed. I hope you can work them out - she is a nice looking girl, albeit a bit chunky as you say...
     
    11-10-2011, 10:09 AM
  #33
Foal
Wow didnt realise people were so mean on this I don't think ill ever post up pics if me riding now
     
    11-10-2011, 10:19 AM
  #34
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by deise    
wow didnt realise people were so mean on this I don't think ill ever post up pics if me riding now
In the critique section, you will get honest answers. Unfortunately sometimes those answers are things we may not want to hear or acknowledge. Comments are posted with intent of helping the op.

There is a sticky at the top of this forum discussing this exact thing.
To all people asking for a critique
     
    11-10-2011, 10:24 AM
  #35
Foal
Yes but there is constructive critisism and there is being mean!
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    11-10-2011, 10:31 AM
  #36
Trained
And there is honest ignorance and then there is knowingly wallowing in that ignorance.
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    11-10-2011, 10:56 AM
  #37
Trained
I agree with the others about how to fix her kicking and attitude problem. The kicking is really NOT ok by any means and by encouraging it (or not fixing it) you are increasing the odds that someone is going to get hurt badly by that horse. Lily is a kicker and though she has never kicked under saddle (if she did her life would become an instant living hell) I always warn other riders and watch where I'm putting her ass. Personally I'd feel pretty terrible if my horse shattered someone's knee with something I thought was funny/cute.

Basically in my opinion you need to RIDE her, right now you're just kind of sitting on her back screwing around. She's the boss not you. Yes there are definitely times I'm screwing around on my horses' backs and being a lazy bum, but that is a "treat" so to speak and only granted when they've behaved during a ride and you can bet that if they start acting up while I'm relaxing I put their butts to work. By work I mean circles, speed changes, direction changes, serpentines, backing up, sidepassing, turns on the forehand and hindquarters. These are all things that will keep her mind busy and if used correctly will teach her that YOU are the boss NOT her. She'll be a happier horse and you'll have a ton more fun with her because of it.

She seems like a cute little mare and I really think you guys make a good pair, but you do need to step up and be the leader before one of you or someone else ends up hurt.
     
    11-10-2011, 11:51 AM
  #38
Foal
I didn't really think anything else needed to be said after Allison Finch's reply, thought she summed it up nicely, but since everyone else is chipping in still, why not add my two cents?
I can see points on both sides of this argument; I completely agree the kicking is a problem and needs to be addressed. I also agree with the methods already mentioned; a corrective whack from a crop is no where near abuse (I thought I remember abuse being brought up in a comment somewhere, forgive me if I'm mistaken) Also, a diet would be in this pony's best interest!
I also understand that the OP was being sarcastic when talking about "pissing off" her horse. And I can see why she might have felt attacked. The advice given was sound, but in all honesty, it could have been said in a "nicer" tone, if you will. Yes, people are offering themselves up for critique, and if that is what they are truly after, they should be receptive to advice, when given constructively.
Anyhow, that's just my thoughts!
     
    11-10-2011, 12:38 PM
  #39
Weanling
I didn't get to watch the videos, it said they were removed by the user. However, I did read what you wrote about it. Hopefully I can offer some constructive criticism & hopefully, even though you said you weren't posting here again, you'll get this somehow:

The horse constantly leaving you in the dirt on trails shouldn't be tolerated, especially if you're just recovering from an injury. You don't want to hurt yourself again, possibly even worse. If you're riding trails alone now, would it be possible to ride with other horses? My guess is that every time she dumps you, she goes back to the barn. Try going out with other horses that she gets along with. Horses are social animals and she might feel more at ease and happier if she has some equine comrades in the woods.

As for the kicking, I personally don't tolerate it from my horse. If he kicks, I do a one rein (in case you don't know, that's taking one rein and pulling it up to your chest) and that makes him constantly do hind-ends. He can't kick because of the way he's bending and doing constant hind-ends is a lot harder than going straight forward. Make her do that until she comes to a stop. If you do this immediately after she kicks every time, she should eventually cut it out since it's more work for her. However, on the other hand, my trainer has told people before when a horse kicks to just ride it out and show them that it doesn't bother you and every time they've done that, the kicking stops.

A good exercise to do before even getting on is flagging her. This will get out all the extra energy she has. You can do this by going into the arena with a lunge whip and letting her run around freely. However, using the lunge whip, you're in charge of how fast she moves (but it's best to let her run as much as she needs to) and what direction she goes. She has to know that you are in charge of where her feet move. You don't hit her with it, just pop it and she should go. Eventually, you should notice her body language telling you that she's listening to you and relying on your instruction. By the end of the flagging session, she should ideally walk up to you when you have your back turned to her. Then you can pat her, walk forward, and she should follow. Even if she has never done this before, she should catch on. It'll just take longer the first few times. I introduced my horse to this and I do it practically every time I go to ride. It really makes a difference!

As for the whole intention of making her mad, I would cut that out. The point of being around horses is to form a partnership with them, letting them know that you're in charge, but that you're a trustworthy leader. Making her mad just for fun is only going to make her resent you and your riding. That may even be part of the reason she dumps you off all the time. Just sayin'.

Good luck with the Haffie!
MandiMal likes this.
     

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