Anybody like to critique my tb gelding? - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding Critique

Anybody like to critique my tb gelding?

This is a discussion on Anybody like to critique my tb gelding? within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Twinkle inthe eye tb gelding

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    02-23-2011, 11:13 AM
  #11
Green Broke
From what I can see he is long in the back and a bit sickle hocked. If his hind end was two inches further forward and his coupling over his rump was smoother he would be fantastic.

Due to his long back he will be a bit difficult to collect and get working off his forehand (see cantering photo.. yes, as you self critiqued, your position is forward and hands up, but he is all the way on his forehand too).

You have a lovely place to ride.. work him on circles and transitions to get him thinking about his hind quarters and trot him up those hills (let him blow at the top!). Work on balance.. and going from extension to collection and back to extensions at the trot using the half halt. Work on spiral circles.. starting large and working smaller and then spiral back out again. Pick a spot on the ground and trot him in nice round circles to get him supple and bending.

Horse has potential. Sit up straight and use your butt and legs to drive him forward and up into your hands.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    02-24-2011, 12:31 AM
  #12
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Equilove    
What kind of saddle is that? The seat looks super deep but it doesn't look like a dressage saddle... looks comfy...
It's just a general purpose saddle, and yes it is super comfy, I have ridden in kreigers and keiffers and gotten a sore back from them which I think is wierd, everyone comments on how comfy my saddle is haha.
I'm pretty sure it's english leather to, but it has no brand on it, some people tell me they think it's a craft/kraft saddle, but I don't know.
     
    02-24-2011, 12:39 AM
  #13
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elana    
From what I can see he is long in the back and a bit sickle hocked. If his hind end was two inches further forward and his coupling over his rump was smoother he would be fantastic.

Due to his long back he will be a bit difficult to collect and get working off his forehand (see cantering photo.. yes, as you self critiqued, your position is forward and hands up, but he is all the way on his forehand too).

You have a lovely place to ride.. work him on circles and transitions to get him thinking about his hind quarters and trot him up those hills (let him blow at the top!). Work on balance.. and going from extension to collection and back to extensions at the trot using the half halt. Work on spiral circles.. starting large and working smaller and then spiral back out again. Pick a spot on the ground and trot him in nice round circles to get him supple and bending.

Horse has potential. Sit up straight and use your butt and legs to drive him forward and up into your hands.
Just putting my stupidity out there, but can you explain what you mean by sickle hocked?

Yeah it's very pretty but all those tree's provide pesky birds that provide "spooking excuses" for Mitchell *rolls eyes*. We own all the way back to a river and some decent hills to. -But mind you I would never swim in the river or take my horses in it, it looks horribly polluted.

I was told when I bought him that he doesn't use the hindquarters properly, which I agree he doesn't, I have been working circles and transitions, when I do circles I start off big and spiral inwards until they are quite small then spiral outwards again and he seems to have no problem doing it. (Since I have had him we have also mastered trot to halt... YUSS)


And I don't particularly know what working off his forehand means, I'm sure I've been told before but I can never remember.


I'm going to try and get one of the local trainers to come out and give me some lessons, but I live so far out that will be like squeezing blood from a stone, but it's worth a try.

Oh and I figured out he actually does know how to use those hind quarters, just not in the way he should be using them (Bucking me off does not count as using your hind quarters Mitch!!!) Now if I can just make him use them effectively.
     
    02-24-2011, 01:00 AM
  #14
Yearling
Sickle-hocked is where there is an angle from hock to fetlock on their back legs, with the back legs extending under them a bit. It puts stress on their stifle and hock joints.
     
    02-24-2011, 01:04 AM
  #15
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Equilove    
Sickle-hocked is where there is an angle from hock to fetlock on their back legs, with the back legs extending under them a bit. It puts stress on their stifle and hock joints.
Ahhh right this makes sense, thankyou
     
    02-24-2011, 02:29 AM
  #16
Weanling
Your riding is not disgusting. I think you are doing a wonderful job with him, and you seem like a very open and eager learner..I try to be the same way. I am sure in no time you two will be perfect.

As far as he goes, he has the sweetest eye and expressive face. And, I am jealous that you get to ride in a tank top in february . I know none of this is helpful info..lol.
     
    02-24-2011, 03:59 AM
  #17
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Starlite    
Your riding is not disgusting. I think you are doing a wonderful job with him, and you seem like a very open and eager learner..I try to be the same way. I am sure in no time you two will be perfect.

As far as he goes, he has the sweetest eye and expressive face. And, I am jealous that you get to ride in a tank top in february . I know none of this is helpful info..lol.
Lol well I think it is, i'm sure there's people out there that are just to polite to agree with me even though the think the same haha.
Well I've got to learn somehow right? I don't have a professional trainer I can go to for every problem, because I live to far out for them to come to me, and I don't have a float. I have 'lessons' with a few friends that have lessons with the trainer though, one in particular that has some qualifications in horses so she's good help.

Yeah that's what drew me to him, I actually found out about him by pure luck and it turned out to work out for the better after searching for a new horse ended up with me being thrown off once, a friend being thrown off once, 2 being sold underneath me and another one diagnosed with laminitis before I bought him. -I looked at 6 horses in total before I found Mitch.

Haha yeah I love it, it's still summer here and it's great except for the lack of rain. Although I find I can ride in a tank top anytime I like, I don't feel the cold to badly when I'm riding.

I wouldn't say we will be perfect lol, structurally on my side of the fence im built like an idiot so I will always be unbalanced when riding, I'm just lucky enough that he's co-ordinated enough to keep himself corrected when I do lose my balance a bit.
But I can ride bareback etc fine my spine doesn't hold me back from anything it just means I have to put up with pain and I will never be judged best rider lol
     
    02-24-2011, 08:34 AM
  #18
Green Broke
Working off the forehand means his weight is on his front legs. He has not learned to curl his back, reach under himself with his hind legs and shift his weight rearward.

To curl his back (not that horses can REALLY curl a lot) and tuck his but and get his weight off the forehand, he has to have well developed abdominal muscles. A great way to develop those nuscles and stretch the topline is to trot up hills.

When you ask for transitions, you need to use your seat and legs (firmly, not kicking) to squeeze the horse forward into your hands.. and then you resist with a half halt.. which is like a gentle squeeze and release.. like you are squeezing a sponge. So, you shift your weight back by sitting up tall and straight in the saddle, tuck your own seat deeper into the horse and squeeze him forward with both legs and then, when he responds you gently squezze with your hands and release (nice and gentle, like a massage motion so you are not hitting him in the mouth but making a request with your hands). The horse's response to the half halt should be to shift his weight rearward. The release with your hands (because you squeeze and release) is the reward for him responding to your request.

It can take YEARS to train a horse to readily move in a collected frame easily. The half halt and driving him forward is where you start, usually at the trot. It is a very subtle thing.. but mastery of the half halt is one of the best tools you can have when training a horse IME.
     
    02-24-2011, 03:55 PM
  #19
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elana    
Working off the forehand means his weight is on his front legs. He has not learned to curl his back, reach under himself with his hind legs and shift his weight rearward.

To curl his back (not that horses can REALLY curl a lot) and tuck his but and get his weight off the forehand, he has to have well developed abdominal muscles. A great way to develop those nuscles and stretch the topline is to trot up hills.

When you ask for transitions, you need to use your seat and legs (firmly, not kicking) to squeeze the horse forward into your hands.. and then you resist with a half halt.. which is like a gentle squeeze and release.. like you are squeezing a sponge. So, you shift your weight back by sitting up tall and straight in the saddle, tuck your own seat deeper into the horse and squeeze him forward with both legs and then, when he responds you gently squezze with your hands and release (nice and gentle, like a massage motion so you are not hitting him in the mouth but making a request with your hands). The horse's response to the half halt should be to shift his weight rearward. The release with your hands (because you squeeze and release) is the reward for him responding to your request.

It can take YEARS to train a horse to readily move in a collected frame easily. The half halt and driving him forward is where you start, usually at the trot. It is a very subtle thing.. but mastery of the half halt is one of the best tools you can have when training a horse IME.
Ahhh right this makes perfect sense now thankyou
I will start work on this properly when I get him back, at the moment he is at the neighbours house in a very little grass paddock being hacked out by heavier riders than me after he threw me quite nastily. I did get back on and I was willing to ride him still but I bruised the entire inside of my knee so it hurt to ride and I found I couldn't squeeze properly. So I thought instead of having him sit in a paddock doing nothing until my knee came right I sent him next door where my neighbour was willing to help (thankyou humphrey!)
-He threw me thanks to being on sweet summer dairy pasture after rain. He obviously needs either huge workouts each day, or normal workouts and tox defy added to feed . I figure if working him good each day doesn't work then I will resort to tox defy.
Big 7yo thoroughbred + Dairy pasture = Not good
     
    02-25-2011, 04:14 AM
  #20
Started
Ok, next chance I get i'm bringing my boy home, went next door to see him today and he looks scared and depressed, now I know the humans wouldn't have done that, the mongrel horses have.
I walked into the paddock to see him and he didn't even have his michievous(sp?) twinkle in his eye, he was almost lifeless looking, he has cuts all over him, nicks from the barbed wire fence, BITE marks from one of the horses he's with, that BLED, and I know exactly which horse did it as he **** well did it in front of me! He has rub marks from his halter (I don't paddock my horses with halters at my house) he also has bits where the flash strap sits under his chin, that looks like the skin has been lifted off and put back on.
Said horse that bit him did it less than a metre away from me, and all Mitchell did was run away scared, I don't blame him that was a big bite! He tried to walk to me and to do that he had to walk past mean horse, and as he did so he sped up considerably to get past him, still walking but he did so a lot faster and relaxed once he was past him.
-I'm not leaving him there any longer than I have to he's coming home I'm not leaving my horse like that he's petrified.

On another note, this picture was taken a few weeks ago, on a day where he was being your typical Mitchell, playful and happy but seeing what he could get away with.
Any good? I know he is probably a bit too tucked under, but I'm working on that... Or rather, will be working on that, once my poor boy is back to himself.
mitchell 2011 002.jpg
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Please critique my gelding RangerK Horse Riding Critique 5 07-27-2010 06:26 PM
Please critique this gelding Dressage10135 Horse Riding Critique 19 05-10-2009 06:37 PM
New Gelding. critique? Twilight Arabians Horse Riding Critique 24 02-01-2009 04:35 PM
Please critique tb gelding AshleyPortraits Horse Riding Critique 6 08-26-2008 04:33 PM
Critique my gelding please. :) *chucks* Horse Riding Critique 6 08-14-2008 09:51 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:01 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0