Attempt at Leg Yield, Circle, Trot Critique - Page 2
   

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Attempt at Leg Yield, Circle, Trot Critique

This is a discussion on Attempt at Leg Yield, Circle, Trot Critique within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • "trot critique"

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    01-25-2012, 07:29 PM
  #11
Trained
In that last video at sitting trot, your elbows are locked and the hands are bouncing up and down. Try lengthening them a hair so you can let your arms hang softly at your sides and therefore let your elbows move freely.

Like others already said, while the leg yield isn't there yet, you're just one more persistent aid away from getting more sideways movement. I found it easier to break it down into steps initially. I would move almost sideways for a few steps, then move mostly straight a few steps before going sideways again. Once both horsey and I figured what both felt like, we put the two together and are now doing decent leg yields.
     
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    01-25-2012, 07:39 PM
  #12
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
In that last video at sitting trot, your elbows are locked and the hands are bouncing up and down. Try lengthening them a hair so you can let your arms hang softly at your sides and therefore let your elbows move freely.
Yeah my upper body is so noisy! But I'm not following, lengthening what a hair? My elbows? I thought they should have more bend in them (after watching the video.) Or lengthening my hands? I'm so curious, why?
     
    01-25-2012, 07:44 PM
  #13
Trained
You are holding your hands out in front of you to where your arms cannot hang freely. This locks your elbows so your hands are incapable of following your horse's head. Sitting in a chair, hold your arms where they are in that video and ask yourself if you feel tension in your arms. Then let them drop relaxed at your sides. Doesn't that feel better? If so, to keep your rein length the same as your horse is used to, you will have to ride with a slightly longer rein to do it. Does that make sense?
Kayty likes this.
     
    01-25-2012, 07:48 PM
  #14
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
You are holding your hands out in front of you to where your arms cannot hang freely. This locks your elbows so your hands are incapable of following your horse's head. Sitting in a chair, hold your arms where they are in that video and ask yourself if you feel tension in your arms. Then let them drop relaxed at your sides. Doesn't that feel better? If so, to keep your rein length the same as your horse is used to, you will have to ride with a slightly longer rein to do it. Does that make sense?
Yes I do! I didn't realize I was putting them in a frame instead of letting them be loose. Thanks for pointing that out! I'll try it out.. though it may take awhile for it to click but I'll do my best.

Thanks, my horse will probably appreciate that change :)

Thank you for your advice, MyBoyPuck!
     
    01-25-2012, 07:48 PM
  #15
Trained
"Do as little as possible, to do as much as possible"
Was what a visiting clinician told me once, when I was really struggling to get shoulder in on a young horse. I was trying to do far too much. He got me to just take a deep breath in, let it out slowly, make myself go floppy and just put my body in the position to ask for shoulder in, while letting everything just hang and relax. And what do you know, shoulder in, dead straight, so soft, straight down the long side.

I think we get so caught up in correctness, trying to make everything perfect, that often we forget to breathe, or allow tension to sneak into our bodies while we ride without noticing.
Skyseternalangel likes this.
     
    01-25-2012, 08:03 PM
  #16
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty    
"Do as little as possible, to do as much as possible"
I think we get so caught up in correctness, trying to make everything perfect, that often we forget to breathe, or allow tension to sneak into our bodies while we ride without noticing.
Yes yes yes... exactly! I know have a huge problem relaxing but it's getting better. I find that when I relax, Sky is the most wonderfully calm but forward and responsive horse. If I'm not.. then he's a nervous wreck. Trying TOO hard, does cause tension and does cause me to forget to breathe. I think one day I want to try riding with my eyes closed. Maybe on Saturday, when my friend is watching, just so I can't see what Sky is doing and I'll try to relax instead of gripping or pumping.

Hopefully other people will read your post and come to the same realization!
     
    01-25-2012, 08:15 PM
  #17
Trained
If you're going to try riding with your eyes closed, I STRONGLY suggest you do it on the lunge, and that you also take away your reins and stirrups.
     
    01-25-2012, 08:25 PM
  #18
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty    
"Do as little as possible, to do as much as possible"
Was what a visiting clinician told me once, when I was really struggling to get shoulder in on a young horse. I was trying to do far too much. He got me to just take a deep breath in, let it out slowly, make myself go floppy and just put my body in the position to ask for shoulder in, while letting everything just hang and relax. And what do you know, shoulder in, dead straight, so soft, straight down the long side.

I think we get so caught up in correctness, trying to make everything perfect, that often we forget to breathe, or allow tension to sneak into our bodies while we ride without noticing.

That's me. I am makin' pretzels with my body trying so hard to make the horse move this way or that.
     
    01-25-2012, 08:26 PM
  #19
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayty    
If you're going to try riding with your eyes closed, I STRONGLY suggest you do it on the lunge, and that you also take away your reins and stirrups.
And put my hands on the saddle, hips, oh sh-- strap?

I'll ask my trainer about it Wednesday :)
     
    01-25-2012, 08:31 PM
  #20
Trained
As a little FYI, lateral movements and leg yield can be produced simply by putting your body in the correct orientation. No pressure need be applied on a trained horse. I have been working my horse from the ground while he transitions to barefoot. I can get him into shoulder-fore and leg yield simply by changing my body position as I walk next to him. Less really is more.
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