Attempt at Western 2 (Video)
   

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Attempt at Western 2 (Video)

This is a discussion on Attempt at Western 2 (Video) within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        11-22-2008, 01:33 PM
      #1
    Foal
    Attempt at Western 2 (Video)

    Well its actually my third day!
    I decided to make a new thread so the new comments/advice wont get mixed up with the old ones..

    THE VIDEO:
         
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        11-22-2008, 01:53 PM
      #2
    Trained
    It doesn't work :(
         
        11-22-2008, 04:46 PM
      #3
    Started
    Hi there!

    OK, I didn't have patience to watch the whole video. My first thought was at the beginning, at least, you did a better job of putting feet forward when you want to go backwards.

    *Shorten your reins/lengthen your arms.
    *Don't look down
    *Look where you want to end up. This changes your position in the saddle and helps the horse to get cues about where he needs to go.
    *Keep those arms low

    You should be able to get your horse's nose on the place you want it based an awful lot on where you're looking. The pressure your position puts on the horse offers him a lot of information about what he needs to do.

    Do you have access to a western saddle anywhere? I think there was a diagram posted of proper western positioning in your other thread. You'll have a lot more control if you shorten your reins and lengthen your arms.

    If you look at this picture of my girlie you'll notice that her arms are too high and she also needs to shorten her reins. But you can see that she's looking where she wants to go and her legs are pretty straight with her trunk.

    In an emergency you can't pull back on the reins with much umph at all with your arms that high and that short. Notice how her pinkies are pointed towards the muzzle. That helps you have more control over the reins. You can have more strength/control with less effort.


         
        11-22-2008, 09:04 PM
      #4
    Weanling
    The first thing you need to do before worrying about neck reining is to get your horse to relax. Just his walk is way too fast and your attempts at turning him just seem to be increasing his speed. Try just walking him for several rides. Keep him on the rail and focus on relaxing yourself and he will relax more also. You need to make slower movements with your body and hands. If he is still walking fast then gently stop him every few strides and when he stands quietly ask him to walk for a few more strides and then stop again. Until you get the walk correct you will not have a successful jog or lope. A western horse should walk only as fast as its rider wants it to. Here is a video that I pulled off of youtube of an APHA World Championship western pleasure class. Maybe it will help you if you see what I am trying to explain to you. Also do try to get your hands on a western saddle. It will sit and feel very different to you and your horse. Good Luck.
         
        11-23-2008, 05:34 AM
      #5
    Foal
    Argh its so hard with the position, the little riding house doesnt have any mirrors so I can't check that while I'm riding and I forget otherwise because I'm so concetrated on how the horse is going..

    OK, I'll start off with just getting the walk and my position right, then. :)
    I wont be filming for a while, because I'll be going in the big riding house (with mirrors! ) and since there might be other people riding, I can't put up my tripod to film.

    But I'll just stick to the walk for a few days, untill it improves, then I can take a video maybe in a week or something ;)
         
        11-23-2008, 09:06 AM
      #6
    Showing
    One thing that I noticed is that your horse gets behind the bit way too often. That comes from too much contact and it can also be an avoidance of the bit depending on where your hands are at the moment. It can be seen throughout the video but in particular while loping him towards the end.
         
        11-23-2008, 11:12 AM
      #7
    Showing
    Two things I noticed:

    - You are bouncing in your saddle at the trot, you should probably work on relaxing into your seat, as your horse is feeling that tension and getting stiff through the back as well.

    - You are starting to develop a chair seat; this is incorrect, doesn't matter if you're riding english or western, a correct position is imperative.

    ETA number 3:
    - Your horse is overflexing, especially at the canter. Use your outside aids to keep him straighter.
         
        11-23-2008, 11:45 AM
      #8
    Trained
    I know JDI already mentioned this but your horse needs to keep his body straight even when you are asking for a turn. I wish I had a picture to illistrate what I'm trying to say.

    You horses head is turned into the right, if you are turning right. His head, neck and spine should all be in line, or very close to it. The fact that his head is turning tells me you are giving him far to much tug on the right rein. Try to tug and release and put your left rein on his neck to ask him to keep it straight. Also USE your legs to keep his body straight.

    Slow, slow, slow and work on your seat! Good luck!
         
        11-23-2008, 02:28 PM
      #9
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by FehrGroundRanch    
    I know JDI already mentioned this but your horse needs to keep his body straight even when you are asking for a turn. I wish I had a picture to illistrate what I'm trying to say.

    You horses head is turned into the right, if you are turning right. His head, neck and spine should all be in line, or very close to it. The fact that his head is turning tells me you are giving him far to much tug on the right rein. Try to tug and release and put your left rein on his neck to ask him to keep it straight. Also USE your legs to keep his body straight.

    Slow, slow, slow and work on your seat! Good luck!
    Ok thanks, but what I learned in dressage is that you do one big tug untill the horse "releases" and accepts and then you release, and that you don't tug release tug release because then you're going to have that tug/release war for ever..
    But everyone rides differently, my friend does the tug/release/tug/release too, and it works for her, so.. :)

    My dressage trainer told me that once in a while I can just do this excersise where I trot so slowly that i'm almost walking, so its just a little faster that walking! (Would that be 'jog' in western..?) and when i'm galloping, I should be so slow that i'm almost trotting! ('Loping'?)
    That way I can feel and work on my transitions, + my horse relaxes completely and I can sit correctly, and relaxed.

    Would that work in western too..?

    Western is so similar to dressage..! Well, I think so. I guess I just expected it to be so different..!
         
        11-23-2008, 02:31 PM
      #10
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Joshie    
    Hi there!

    OK, I didn't have patience to watch the whole video. My first thought was at the beginning, at least, you did a better job of putting feet forward when you want to go backwards.

    *Shorten your reins/lengthen your arms.
    *Don't look down
    *Look where you want to end up. This changes your position in the saddle and helps the horse to get cues about where he needs to go.
    *Keep those arms low

    You should be able to get your horse's nose on the place you want it based an awful lot on where you're looking. The pressure your position puts on the horse offers him a lot of information about what he needs to do.

    Do you have access to a western saddle anywhere? I think there was a diagram posted of proper western positioning in your other thread. You'll have a lot more control if you shorten your reins and lengthen your arms.

    If you look at this picture of my girlie you'll notice that her arms are too high and she also needs to shorten her reins. But you can see that she's looking where she wants to go and her legs are pretty straight with her trunk.

    In an emergency you can't pull back on the reins with much umph at all with your arms that high and that short. Notice how her pinkies are pointed towards the muzzle. That helps you have more control over the reins. You can have more strength/control with less effort.

    In dressage, I have my elbows bent, so I would pretty much have to do the oppisite..? I have to straighten my arms more, is what you're saying..?

    And keep them down.. I guess I lift them so much because i'm trying to turn my horse so since I don't have any space to tug on them I lift them and kind of cross them over.. xD

    But ok, I'll start off by shortening my reins untill he turns his head without me having to do it..! :)
         

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