Beginning to jump feedback
 
 

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Beginning to jump feedback

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  • Beguining to jump on horses
  • How long have you been riding when you started jumping 1 m eith horse

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    07-13-2012, 10:37 AM
  #1
Foal
Beginning to jump feedback

You've helped me before in helping me to understand better my daughter's riding lessons--what's going on, what's expected, what's within normal. So I'm here again, with my questions.

She takes weekly lessons, and she's been jumping for the last 6-7 of them.

Could you please give me some pointers in terms of what to look for, what questions to ask the instructor, and how to understand all of this better.




This is her last lesson. I hope I got the name of the jump right.


Thank so much!
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    07-13-2012, 12:38 PM
  #2
Foal
1st and 2nd video - it looks like she is leaning forward the whole time and just going more forward over the jump. There should be a noticeable point in which she gets into 2-point.
She should have a little more contact with the saddle so she can have a driving seat. And defiantly always keep heels down. Some instructors say it's good to be more forward in the saddle because it helps keep the horse light and energized, but I myself prefer to have a fuller seat because I can 'drive' him a little better with more contact.

Last video- really keep heels down over the jump. It will help her not get thrown onto the horses neck. Also a couple times she caug he horse in the mouth, she really needs to work on giving more of a crest release. (move hands higher up neck.) she can put her hands on the horses neck or even grab some mane. It's not bad it helps the rider keep balance. I sill do it.

She is a really good rider. It took me a long time to be able to jump. She does really well.
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    07-13-2012, 10:13 PM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlondieHorseChic    
1st and 2nd video - it looks like she is leaning forward the whole time and just going more forward over the jump. There should be a noticeable point in which she gets into 2-point.
She should have a little more contact with the saddle so she can have a driving seat. And defiantly always keep heels down. Some instructors say it's good to be more forward in the saddle because it helps keep the horse light and energized, but I myself prefer to have a fuller seat because I can 'drive' him a little better with more contact.

Last video- really keep heels down over the jump. It will help her not get thrown onto the horses neck. Also a couple times she caug he horse in the mouth, she really needs to work on giving more of a crest release. (move hands higher up neck.) she can put her hands on the horses neck or even grab some mane. It's not bad it helps the rider keep balance. I sill do it.

She is a really good rider. It took me a long time to be able to jump. She does really well.
Thank you for taking the time! I'm trying to process this in the context of her lessons.

She's being taught to approach in 2-point and to "hold her position" over the jumps. Does it matter that this is an eventing barn?

She is being told to keep her heels down (and reminded frequently), so I guess she's trying her best for now, but maybe it isn't working out. But the release wasn't mentioned yet at all. Is the release being taught separately, or if she's being told to keep her position (2-point) then it is sort of incorporated into it, without the terminology?

Today when she practiced cantering around the arena in 2-point, she was told not to lean on the neck at all, and to just balance herself. Is this a step towards a proper release? Is the crest release introduced right away when they start jumping?

It is hard for me to see whether she's following the instuctions, but knowing her, she's trying her best.

This is some of her today's lesson. She said that jumping felt the best yet--she felt more confident and it felt smoother too.

     
    07-13-2012, 10:32 PM
  #4
Foal
I also meant to ask (but now can's seem to be able to edit my previous post) about the approach at 2-point. Does this depend on the level of training (she's just started jumping, and has been riding for less than a year), or an approach to riding (eventing vs. ???) or just a teaching strategy? Or is it not generally done at all?

What would be the reasons for teaching a beginner this way? Pros and Cons of this?

We do like the instructor so far, and I don't want to second-guess her, but I just want to be more aware of what is being taught and why.

Thanks!
     
    07-13-2012, 11:52 PM
  #5
Foal
She looked alot better in the video from today. With the 2 point: thinking back to when I first learned I think I remember being told to approach in 2 point because it helps you get a feel for when the horse is going to take off and how to tell. It doesnt matter as much with smaller jumps and lesson horses. (i am in NO way being degrading) With smaller jumps if you get in 2 point to early you wont be 'left behind' or if you get up to late you wont be knocked out of the saddle. Lesson horses are generaly seasoned jumpers so you don't have to worry about them refusing a jump or running out of a jump. It is NOT GOOD if you are in 2 point to early and your horse decides to turn sharp or slam on the brakes. You fall on their neck or go over thier shoulder.
The release doesnt matter as much over the smaller jumps. The purpose of it is so that when the horse is jumping large jumpes they can stretch out their noses to: some people say it helps propel them, others say it helps them keep their balance. I can't remember when I was told to start giving a release. I can understand why the instructor is not giving her all these things at once. If there is an infromation overload it takes the fun out of it. Once she learns all of the 'steps' to jumping it becomes a habit and you don't have to think of it. So the instructor is probably letting her get into the habit of 2 point then once she has gotten that then will work on the release.
I first learned to jump at hunter barn so I was always told I needed to lean back. The barn I am currently at told me to stay light in the saddle and just know when to have my weight forward or back. I now jump for fun since I started to hate the stress of the show circut. The position I ride in depends on what I am doing, what horse I ride, and even the terrain I ride on. So yes the eventing part could be different. (i have never been coached by an eventing instructor so I don't know first hand)
In regard to heels. I had trouble with keeping my heels down, so one of my instructors told me to do 'heel excersises' which were basicly standing on a stair with the ball of your foot on the edge of the stair and your heel over the edge. Then put your heel down and hold the position. She had told me to do each foot seperatly and try to do this daily. Gradualy work up how long you hold the positon for. (after a few weeks she wanted me to hold it 5 minutes straight for each leg)

On a completly different note DO NOT let her get into the habit of looking down at the jump. Look at the jump through the horses ears, but don't look down at the jump. (i still have the habit of doing this occasionaly. It is a hard habit to break.)
I hope this helps some. Sorry for the novel of an answer and sorry for all typos and spelling errors.
     
    07-14-2012, 10:42 AM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlondieHorseChic    
She looked alot better in the video from today. With the 2 point: thinking back to when I first learned I think I remember being told to approach in 2 point because it helps you get a feel for when the horse is going to take off and how to tell. It doesnt matter as much with smaller jumps and lesson horses. (i am in NO way being degrading) With smaller jumps if you get in 2 point to early you wont be 'left behind' or if you get up to late you wont be knocked out of the saddle. Lesson horses are generaly seasoned jumpers so you don't have to worry about them refusing a jump or running out of a jump. It is NOT GOOD if you are in 2 point to early and your horse decides to turn sharp or slam on the brakes. You fall on their neck or go over thier shoulder.
This makes sense. At what point do they start teaching not to approach at 2-point? From my point of view she`s such a new rider, I`m surprised she`d doing jumping at all. But she loves it, and it seems that the instructor is safety oriented. So hopefully that`s okay.


Quote:
The release doesnt matter as much over the smaller jumps. The purpose of it is so that when the horse is jumping large jumpes they can stretch out their noses to: some people say it helps propel them, others say it helps them keep their balance. I can't remember when I was told to start giving a release. I can understand why the instructor is not giving her all these things at once. If there is an infromation overload it takes the fun out of it. Once she learns all of the 'steps' to jumping it becomes a habit and you don't have to think of it. So the instructor is probably letting her get into the habit of 2 point then once she has gotten that then will work on the release.
This makes sense, thanks. How is it taught? Are they just instructed to move their hands forward?
Quote:

I first learned to jump at hunter barn so I was always told I needed to lean back. The barn I am currently at told me to stay light in the saddle and just know when to have my weight forward or back. I now jump for fun since I started to hate the stress of the show circut. The position I ride in depends on what I am doing, what horse I ride, and even the terrain I ride on. So yes the eventing part could be different. (i have never been coached by an eventing instructor so I don't know first hand)
Am I right in my understanding that there are several `correct` ways to jump, based on the discipline? Is one way better than the other, or they are just different techniques?

Quote:
In regard to heels. I had trouble with keeping my heels down, so one of my instructors told me to do 'heel excersises' which were basicly standing on a stair with the ball of your foot on the edge of the stair and your heel over the edge. Then put your heel down and hold the position. She had told me to do each foot seperatly and try to do this daily. Gradualy work up how long you hold the positon for. (after a few weeks she wanted me to hold it 5 minutes straight for each leg)
Thanks for this! I did read about this exercise some time ago, and told her about it, but she keeps forgetting and I don`t want to nag. I wish her instructor told her that, she really listens to her. But I`ll try reminding her one more time.

Quote:
On a completly different note DO NOT let her get into the habit of looking down at the jump. Look at the jump through the horses ears, but don't look down at the jump. (i still have the habit of doing this occasionaly. It is a hard habit to break.)
I hope this helps some. Sorry for the novel of an answer and sorry for all typos and spelling errors.
This is something her instructor is working with her. I hear `look up, look up, look up` all the time!

Thank you so much, you`re so very helpful.
     
    07-14-2012, 01:54 PM
  #7
Foal
I just wanted to pipe in and say that I think it is great that you are so engaged in your daughter's lessons. My mom doesn't know much about horses, but over the years she has tried her best to understand and help me in any way she can. Looking for advice from all of us horse lovers online was a great idea! Good for you!
shaggy likes this.
     
    07-15-2012, 12:28 AM
  #8
Weanling
Your daughter seems to be progressing nicely! And I agree--way to go that you're interested in her lessons and wanting to ask the right questions!

Her holding her two-point position going towards the jump isn't uncommon for beginner riders. As she gets better and gets the "feel" of the jump better, her instructor will likely at some point have her stop it. But it's a good training tool to get beginner jumpers into a good position over fences--this way they don't get left behind.
     
    07-15-2012, 04:09 AM
  #9
Foal
It all depends on the riders progress and the instructors way of teaching. I was taught when I 'upgraded' to the next level horse which also ment a little higher jumps.
Yes, in my experience there are different ways to jump. Most people tend to do what they feel most comfortable with. In fact not to long ago people would hardly get into a 2 point and some riders would just collapse on their horses neck over the jumps. I don't really know if one is better than the other. I just jump how I feel most comfortable and whatever is best for my horse. ( he is still learning o jump so we get a weirs jump every now and then so I really have to work at feeling for when he is going to jump)

Your welcome!!!
And I am really glad you are trying to understand what goes on in your daughters lessons. My parents would just drop me off and leave. They only watched me ride at shows.
     
    07-16-2012, 09:38 AM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by LizzieE    
I just wanted to pipe in and say that I think it is great that you are so engaged in your daughter's lessons. My mom doesn't know much about horses, but over the years she has tried her best to understand and help me in any way she can. Looking for advice from all of us horse lovers online was a great idea! Good for you!
I`m trying!

Quote:
Originally Posted by heymckate    
Your daughter seems to be progressing nicely! And I agree--way to go that you're interested in her lessons and wanting to ask the right questions!

Her holding her two-point position going towards the jump isn't uncommon for beginner riders. As she gets better and gets the "feel" of the jump better, her instructor will likely at some point have her stop it. But it's a good training tool to get beginner jumpers into a good position over fences--this way they don't get left behind.
Good to know, thank you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BlondieHorseChic    
It all depends on the riders progress and the instructors way of teaching. I was taught when I 'upgraded' to the next level horse which also ment a little higher jumps.
Yes, in my experience there are different ways to jump. Most people tend to do what they feel most comfortable with. In fact not to long ago people would hardly get into a 2 point and some riders would just collapse on their horses neck over the jumps. I don't really know if one is better than the other. I just jump how I feel most comfortable and whatever is best for my horse. ( he is still learning o jump so we get a weirs jump every now and then so I really have to work at feeling for when he is going to jump)

Your welcome!!!
And I am really glad you are trying to understand what goes on in your daughters lessons. My parents would just drop me off and leave. They only watched me ride at shows.
This is interesting about different ways to jump. If I compare to tennis, for example, there are several `correct` ways to hit a forehand with good form, and there are also ways to hit it with poor form and still have a powerful shot most of the time (but this risks injury), and there there`s such poor form that it won`t let you hit the ball with any decent consistency.

What elements should always be present in a jump for the form to be good, and in what elements more variation is allowed for to account for personal preference etc?

Thanks.
     

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