Comformation Critique for a Morab
 
 

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Comformation Critique for a Morab

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    10-18-2011, 12:27 PM
  #1
Weanling
Comformation Critique for a Morab

These pictures were taken two weeks ago when I wasn't working her much and just letting her gain weight, so she had very little muscle. She is still gaining also and looks a lot better now then in the pictures below, I just haven't gotten around to taking new ones because I have so much going on right now.

I realize the pictures aren't the best but she wasn't standing well for my boyfriend and was being a brat because he spoils her and doesn't make her do anything.









     
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    10-18-2011, 03:41 PM
  #2
Green Broke
I assume this horse is a rescue. Very thin and a horse this thin is difficult to assess.

That being said she has nice low hocks and correct legs tho she is a bit light in bone. Her feet need work. Her shoulder angle looks OK.

Her head is also very large looking and she is a bit hammer headed. If her neck does not fill in after she has some groceries, then she will be Ewe Necked.

Get some groceries in her and come back in about 4 months (or in the spring) and lets see her then.

I do like a black horse.
     
    10-19-2011, 10:24 AM
  #3
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elana    
I assume this horse is a rescue. Very thin and a horse this thin is difficult to assess.

That being said she has nice low hocks and correct legs tho she is a bit light in bone. Her feet need work. Her shoulder angle looks OK.

Her head is also very large looking and she is a bit hammer headed. If her neck does not fill in after she has some groceries, then she will be Ewe Necked.

Get some groceries in her and come back in about 4 months (or in the spring) and lets see her then.

I do like a black horse.
Yes she is a rescue, and has gained a lot in just one month.

I blame her being light boned because she's an half Arabian. LOL. Her feet were all cracked when I got her and were done when I first got her and is due next week.

She is ewe necked but with more weight and muscle I don't think it'll look that bad because its already looking better then when I first got her.

I know! She's solid black too. Haha I love solid black horses.

This is a picture of when I first got her and then a week later.

     
    10-19-2011, 11:04 AM
  #4
Foal
Well, she's looking much better than when you first rescued her!

Her neck doesn't attache into the shoulder very well, which could be a balance problem if you plan on dressage or something. Her head's a bit large, too, but she has a cute face and a lovely, fluffy forelock! (I love fluffy forelocks. My horse Coco has a few hairs to call a forelock :( ). She has fairly steep withers, so be careful when you're choosing a saddle - it could slid and cause back pain and sores, but her hindquarters and withers are about even, which is good.

Overall, cute, eye pleasing. Might make a good trail horse, lesson horse for kids or a small hunter/jumper.

Hope that helped! :)

PS: I wouldn't braid her tail like that at this point. It makes everything look too... skinny. No offence.
     
    10-19-2011, 11:18 AM
  #5
Green Broke
Nice looking horse, and you've done well with her so far! My only worry would be that her wither is quite a sharp drop so she may find it difficult to do any work on the vertical compared to a horse with a natural sloping wither. Her leg bones (sorry, I know all these in German hah!) are in a good proportion too, but her neck at the moment seems fairly thin. This will just take time to build up!

Good luck, and keep us updated with more pictures!!
     
    10-19-2011, 11:22 AM
  #6
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elana    
I assume this horse is a rescue. Very thin and a horse this thin is difficult to assess.

That being said she has nice low hocks and correct legs tho she is a bit light in bone. Her feet need work. Her shoulder angle looks OK.

Her head is also very large looking and she is a bit hammer headed. If her neck does not fill in after she has some groceries, then she will be Ewe Necked.

Get some groceries in her and come back in about 4 months (or in the spring) and lets see her then.

I do like a black horse.
Actually, from a purely structural standpoint an underweight horse is IDEAL to critique... There is no musclature or fat coverage to distract from how the horse is put together. (check out the sticky at the top of this section to see what I mean)

Musclature can be altered, depending on the structure of the horse, through correct work and enough groceries.... Weight can go up and down... The bone structure of the horse is set after maturity and will not change (barring injury, I guess)

The photos show a weak an unimpressive looking horse... And you can see both breeds of her cross in her structure. That said, with some more weight and SLOW AND STEADY work she will be a new horse come spring... And better still next year.

From a conformation standpoint I don't see a lot really wrong with her. Structurally she has A nice enough shoulder, her legs appear more or less correct, her pelvic angle isn't too bad (especially considering her breed, I have seen a lot worse), to me she could use some more pelvic length (point of hip to point of buttock if you just went "huh?"). Her back length is nice, though her wither is likely to be prominent even after she has filled in some, her LS placement is not too bad. Her neck will fill out (you can already see how much it has changed... It will continue to with proper nutrition and it will finish up much better with correct work), she does have an unfortunately unfeminine head... That won't be likely to change but when her neck fills out it should at least look less disproportionate.

Overall she isn't as fugly as first glance might make her seem... Do remember that when you are bringing a horse back from emaciation to do any and all work very slowly at first, build it up very very slowly or you can wind up with an injured horse simply due to the fact they don't have the muscle tone and fitness to do the work. I start on the ground, ground driving or leading everywhere, mostly at a walk. (keep them short at first), when I start riding work I first get the walk MASTERED before moving on. A proper walk is hard work, and it will give you a good idea of when the horse is truly fit enough to work on the other gaits without learning bad habits or straining them.

Good luck with her... And I hope to see updated photos next year showing a very different little lady!
     
    10-19-2011, 12:51 PM
  #7
Teen Forum Moderator
I'm hoping that this isn't the morab that you were free jumping over 2-3' fences?

If she is a rescue, she needs to be put into work extremely slowly, and even slower because she has less than perfect conformation. She could be seriously injured if you don't allow her to build up the muscle she needs first before even trying to trot her over poles.
Elana likes this.
     
    10-19-2011, 03:22 PM
  #8
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by CocoPazo    
Well, she's looking much better than when you first rescued her!
Her neck doesn't attache into the shoulder very well, which could be a balance problem if you plan on dressage or something. Her head's a bit large, too, but she has a cute face and a lovely, fluffy forelock! (I love fluffy forelocks. My horse Coco has a few hairs to call a forelock :( ). She has fairly steep withers, so be careful when you're choosing a saddle - it could slid and cause back pain and sores, but her hindquarters and withers are about even, which is good.
Overall, cute, eye pleasing. Might make a good trail horse, lesson horse for kids or a small hunter/jumper.
Hope that helped! :)
PS: I wouldn't braid her tail like that at this point. It makes everything look too... skinny. No offence.
Thanks, the person was working her every day for 1+ hours in one direction in a circle! Given she was very muscly but if you don't have much feed (especially with three horses) and don't know how to properly train a horse you shouldn't be trying to do anything with it.

I know! They had her forelock cut straight across. I gave her some layers so it doesn't look as bad. Haha.

I have a saddle with replaceable gullets, so I don't have to spend oodles of money for new saddle to fit her gladly.

I'm training her for a kids dressage/jumper pony (she has the perfect temperament for a kid; very kind!).

I only did it for pictures.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DuffyDuck    
Nice looking horse, and you've done well with her so far! My only worry would be that her wither is quite a sharp drop so she may find it difficult to do any work on the vertical compared to a horse with a natural sloping wither. Her leg bones (sorry, I know all these in German hah!) are in a good proportion too, but her neck at the moment seems fairly thin. This will just take time to build up!

Good luck, and keep us updated with more pictures!!
It doesn't help that she has an ewe neck. LOL.
Thankss, I will(:

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLastUnicorn    
Actually, from a purely structural standpoint an underweight horse is IDEAL to critique... There is no musclature or fat coverage to distract from how the horse is put together. (check out the sticky at the top of this section to see what I mean)

Musclature can be altered, depending on the structure of the horse, through correct work and enough groceries.... Weight can go up and down... The bone structure of the horse is set after maturity and will not change (barring injury, I guess)

The photos show a weak an unimpressive looking horse... And you can see both breeds of her cross in her structure. That said, with some more weight and SLOW AND STEADY work she will be a new horse come spring... And better still next year.

From a conformation standpoint I don't see a lot really wrong with her. Structurally she has A nice enough shoulder, her legs appear more or less correct, her pelvic angle isn't too bad (especially considering her breed, I have seen a lot worse), to me she could use some more pelvic length (point of hip to point of buttock if you just went "huh?"). Her back length is nice, though her wither is likely to be prominent even after she has filled in some, her LS placement is not too bad. Her neck will fill out (you can already see how much it has changed... It will continue to with proper nutrition and it will finish up much better with correct work), she does have an unfortunately unfeminine head... That won't be likely to change but when her neck fills out it should at least look less disproportionate.

Overall she isn't as fugly as first glance might make her seem... Do remember that when you are bringing a horse back from emaciation to do any and all work very slowly at first, build it up very very slowly or you can wind up with an injured horse simply due to the fact they don't have the muscle tone and fitness to do the work. I start on the ground, ground driving or leading everywhere, mostly at a walk. (keep them short at first), when I start riding work I first get the walk MASTERED before moving on. A proper walk is hard work, and it will give you a good idea of when the horse is truly fit enough to work on the other gaits without learning bad habits or straining them.

Good luck with her... And I hope to see updated photos next year showing a very different little lady!
Please read above of how the girl worked her every day.
I just got on her a few days ago for the very first time since I've owned her. We're currently working on steering (its horrible since she was only ridden in a circle in one direction), stopping, go, and back up.
Thankss(: I will.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Endiku    
I'm hoping that this isn't the morab that you were free jumping over 2-3' fences?

If she is a rescue, she needs to be put into work extremely slowly, and even slower because she has less than perfect conformation. She could be seriously injured if you don't allow her to build up the muscle she needs first before even trying to trot her over poles.
Read above.
     
    10-19-2011, 04:56 PM
  #9
Weanling
Oh and to Endiku did she look like she was having difficulty clearing the jumps?

...

I wouldn't have raised them if she was, and I wouldn't be jumping her if she wasn't ready. I'd been working her for half an hour since I got her (started out mostly walking until she got more weight to keep her muscles up and start building her neck up more). JS.
     
    10-19-2011, 06:07 PM
  #10
Teen Forum Moderator
OP- I was well aware of her situation when I made my post.

Riding or running that mare in circles does not count as 'careful and well planned training and conditioning.' In fact, it probably did the opposite. Riding her in one direction would cause the muscles in one side to develope much more than in the other, throwing her off balance and giving her a dominant and weak side. Now, I realize that it was not you who rode her this way, but if even you knew that this way of riding wasn't correct, why are you using it in your argument?

It takes more than just going in circles to prep a horse for jumping of any kind. You need to teach her to move off of her haunches rather than her forehand, and build up her hind end and shoulders. She needs a good topline to be established before she can jump, if you don't want to risk her getting hurt.

You said yourself that she has very little muscle. IMO before any tough work she needs her basics established (certainly get her direction problems cleared up) and a lot of work needs to be done at the walk and trot before cantering her over jumps. She's also still in need of groceries, but not as much as the muscle.

I'm not saying not to jump her, I'm telling you that you need to get her conditioned first.

Did she look like she was having trouble over those jumps? In short, no. But I didn't tell you that it looked like she was having trouble. I told you that it was dangerous and could hurt her. Asking her to jump straight jumps that are as high as 3' repeatedly on her first day of free jumping is just asking for injury.

How is she telling you that she's ready? Just because she isn't refusing to jump doesnt mean its easy for her. It just says a lot for her personality.

I'll give you this. You have a remarkable little horse. She's definitely not what I'd consider pretty, and not anywhere near to dressage or jumping quality in my eyes from afar, I probably wouldn't even jump her at all, even after some bulking up- but she's obviousely got the guts for it. If she didn't balk at all, and was able to jump that well as many times as you sent her over them; I'd say she's got a lot of potential.

That said, I still stand with the fact that it would be best to stop the jumping and just work poles for now, and spend some time teaching her to ride in frame. Most eventers are started in dressage first to gain the endurance and muscles needed, then learn to jump. I think your mare would benifit from the same type of training. Get another thirty or fourty pounds on her, start from the beginning. She may have more potential that at first glance.
     

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