confirmation critique
   

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confirmation critique

This is a discussion on confirmation critique within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • Neck and withers confirmation problems
  • +16.3 hand standard bred horse

 
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    02-22-2011, 06:39 PM
  #1
Banned
confirmation critique

I certainly hope these pictures are good enough for now. He wouldn't stay still and he kept following me. Please no comments about his weight as we are working on that right now.

He's a 16.3 hand thoroughbred. He's crossed with something else but, we are just not sure what it could be so could anyone take a wild guess? We think maybe standard bred. I'm also throwing a picture in there for the hell of it.

my babe.jpg
He's special... look at those ears... and the face he's making...
2011-02-20 13.16.31.jpg
Side view...
2011-02-20 13.09.55.jpg
Back legs...
2011-02-20 13.09.20.jpg
Front legs...
     
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    02-22-2011, 06:45 PM
  #2
Green Broke
Looks like maybe an Appendix...
He's a bit long in the back, high in the withers & needs alot of muscle on his topline. He also has a very sharp slope to his shoulder. His back legs appear to be sicklehocked as well.
I love his curly mane and with some weight I think he should turn out to be a pretty solid horse.
     
    02-22-2011, 06:54 PM
  #3
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilruffian    
Looks like maybe an Appendix...
He's a bit long in the back, high in the withers & needs alot of muscle on his topline. He also has a very sharp slope to his shoulder. His back legs appear to be sicklehocked as well.
I love his curly mane and with some weight I think he should turn out to be a pretty solid horse.

Sorry, i'm new to the whole confirmation thing. What exactly is sicklehocked? He's always had predominant withers, even when he was at a nice weight and with muscle. He's not very comfortable to ride bareback either.

Sharp slope to shoulder? I'm sorry I feel dumb.
     
    02-23-2011, 08:58 AM
  #4
Banned
Bumping this up
     
    02-23-2011, 09:55 AM
  #5
Green Broke
I agree.. sickle hocked (this means the hocks are set too far back and the lower leg tends to not be vertical, but the hind feet set forward so the lower leg.. cannon.. is at an angle from the foot to the hock). His withers are very high and do not carry well into his back. He is rump high, long backed, steep crouped and rough coupled. He has a steep shoulder. His front legs rotate to the outside. His feet need trimming and he needs weight.. and trotting up hills to help his top line and muscling. He has what appears to be a hatchet neck (where the neck and withers meet there is an abrupt dip)

On the good side he has low set hocks, good bone, a pleasant expression and may have decent feet onece the are trimmed. I see Standarbred in there and I like the bay color with the star a LOT.

With feed and lots of long trots up hill he will improve. He will always be a hard horse to hold together (collect) but may have wonderful extensions with patient training to build up his muscles. With that steep shoulder I probably would not spend a lot of time jumping him or teaching him to jump.

I would get him out on the trails for those hills and in the arena to work on transistions (he will transition down roughly until he has the training and musculature to handle this work). I would also work for extensions and collections in the same gait in the arena.
     
    02-23-2011, 10:26 AM
  #6
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elana    
I agree.. sickle hocked (this means the hocks are set too far back and the lower leg tends to not be vertical, but the hind feet set forward so the lower leg.. cannon.. is at an angle from the foot to the hock). His withers are very high and do not carry well into his back. He is rump high, long backed, steep crouped and rough coupled. He has a steep shoulder. His front legs rotate to the outside. His feet need trimming and he needs weight.. and trotting up hills to help his top line and muscling. He has what appears to be a hatchet neck (where the neck and withers meet there is an abrupt dip)

On the good side he has low set hocks, good bone, a pleasant expression and may have decent feet onece the are trimmed. I see Standarbred in there and I like the bay color with the star a LOT.

With feed and lots of long trots up hill he will improve. He will always be a hard horse to hold together (collect) but may have wonderful extensions with patient training to build up his muscles. With that steep shoulder I probably would not spend a lot of time jumping him or teaching him to jump.

I would get him out on the trails for those hills and in the arena to work on transistions (he will transition down roughly until he has the training and musculature to handle this work). I would also work for extensions and collections in the same gait in the arena.

Thank you for explaining that for me. Yeah, his withers have always been very high, even at a nice decent weight. It was very hard finding a saddle that fit him. The farrier is coming out this week on Friday to give him a trim. Would the hatchet neck become a problem in the future or next few years?

What feed would you suggest putting him on? I was going to put him on Senior Poulin but, I was also going to put him on Triple Crown Senior. According to the dentist he's still young but, no where over 15 although, I don't know what to believe. I am also going to throw him on some Beet Pulp and he gets free choice hay 2nd cut because he won't eat 1st cut.

Yeah, he holds his head up VERY high all the time. I'm tried a lot of different things to get his head down {martingale} but, I am probably going to put him in a surcingle when I can but, he has a nice extension {see picture below} as, for the jumping when I had him vetted out the vet said he'd be a nice jumper but, nothing over 2'3. I don't jump him a lot though.
162988_1771543253048_1373267880_1941572_7471808_n.jpg

At this point we are going to work more on dressage and engaging his hind end. His transitions have always been nice and easy but, I will work him on the hills and work more for extensions and collections. I'm not going to do anything more than walk/trot work because of his condition.

Thank you
     
    02-23-2011, 12:18 PM
  #7
Green Broke
I do not think the hatchet neck will make the horse unsound.. it is a conformation falt and could have been caused by a bad situation when he was tied up as a baby (often injury related).

In that picture he is trotting along but he is not in an extended trot.

To get the horse to lower his head you need to get him to extend his topline. A horse cannot streatch his topline if he does not have adequate muscle development of the abdominal muscles. Hills.. trotting up hills.. will help with this a LOT. A horse the has his head high may also be showing signs of discomfort. A high head is a hollowed back.

I am no expert on modern horse feeds. If I wanted to add weight to a horse I would add 1/4 c or corn oil to his grain. Fats are heavy on calories. The only thing to remember is that you may need to supplement the feed with some extra vitamin A since corn oil can interfere with Vitamin A absorption. I also used to get some Alfalfa cubes and put a pound or two of those in his ration.
     

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