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Critique jumping/pony/me

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  • 11 hands pony jumping

 
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    09-05-2009, 03:20 PM
  #1
Foal
Critique jumping/pony/me

I just want to know what I should work on with me and my pony jumping wise. I do have a coach but I like outside critique as well. He is 13.2hh and and I am 5'3 (not growing anymore) so I would also like to know if I look to tall for him. Just tell me what you think needs help in my position and anything you can spot. Thanks! I have a show (the first for my pony and I) so I am perfecting right now and trying to get him used to seeing new and "scary jumps". The pictures are to large so could you please look onto my barn page and just click the link to Impressive Attire (Piccolo). Thank you very much!
     
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    09-05-2009, 03:23 PM
  #2
Yearling
You look good on him :)

Maybe a itty bit too big, but not a big deal at all.

Since you aren't growing anymore, you should be fitting him just fine for all the years left to come xD

Beautiful little pony byt the way! <3
     
    09-05-2009, 03:39 PM
  #3
Foal
1.JPG

11!.JPG

6!.JPG

5!.JPG

I found out how to post the pictures and make them smaller! Here you go!
     
    09-05-2009, 06:48 PM
  #4
Foal
Are you planning on doing pony jumpers or hunters with him? For jumpers size doesn't really matter, (unless your pony was 11 hands, then you may be holding him back a bit) but for hunters... hmmm... I've never done pony hunter classes but I do know that if he measures 13.2+ he's a large, and considering you'd be competing against other kids your height on bigger ponies you may be marked down a little for suitability. If he measures a tad under 13.2 then he's a medium and you'd probably be against smaller kids, so again, suitability comes into factor. Again, I'm no pony hunter expert, but that's just my reasoning. If you were just showing at a local level or doing small rated shows the above shouldn't matter as much- you really don't look that big on your pony.

Riding wise, I think that you'll find a drastic change in your position if you focus on sinking into your heels. IMO, if that happens the other little things will all fall into place.
     
    09-05-2009, 09:42 PM
  #5
Foal
I am planning on just doing schooling shows with him, only small stuff. He is fairly nervous and not the personality type for a lot of big shows, and even if he gets a lot of training and experience on the show circuit I don't have the time for this. Thanks for the critique though!
     
    09-05-2009, 11:36 PM
  #6
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by kerplop    
I do know that if he measures 13.2+ he's a large, and considering you'd be competing against other kids your height on bigger ponies you may be marked down a little for suitability. If he measures a tad under 13.2 then he's a medium and you'd probably be against smaller kids, so again, suitability comes into factor. Again, I'm no pony hunter expert, but that's just my reasoning. If you were just showing at a local level or doing small rated shows the above shouldn't matter as much- you really don't look that big on your pony.
13.2 is a medium, anything above that, even if its an 1/8th of an inch is a large. I know because I have a 13.2 who barely made mediums, but has her permanent card now so it doesn't matter. She's always a medium, as long as we don't get her remeasured.
     
    09-06-2009, 11:58 AM
  #7
Started
You look good, but your stirrup is to far back on your foot. Keep the stirrup on the ball of your feet and you will be able to get your heels down. Do that and it will help not jump forward.
     
    09-06-2009, 09:20 PM
  #8
Trained
You have a very cute pony! And you also have a very brave pony who clearly loves his job and loves to please you.

The first thing I see, is that you have no security in your lower leg at all. You have lost your lower leg in every picture - so I ask why? Lets look at what is causing the problem -

First, your knees. You are gripping with your knees for a base of security while over fences, instead of relying in your lower leg *inner calf and heels*. This is a very common error in riders, when they aren't being taught correctly by their coaches.

Secondly, your heels. You are not allowing them to do their job. What is their job? They must be allowed to anchor you into your tack. They need to beable to weight you down and support you.

Ok so how can we fix this? Firstly - you need to replace your irons. They are too far back on your foot, they need to be under the balls of your feet instead. The outside bar needs to be at your pinky toe, and the inside bar needs to be at the knuckly of your big toe.

Now, your heels can do their job, which is anchor you. But they cannot do that, until you open your knees, and re-adjust your leg.

You need to get your leg at your girth, and you need to use the inside of your calf and lock it there. Open your knees off your saddle and allow your legs to be wrapped around your horses girth - your legs must be wrapped around your horses girth.

Now, allow the weight of your upper body, to flow down through your back, seat, thighs, lower leg - to enter and sink into your heels.

Now - you have an effective lower leg. Do not allow your legs to leave that girth, do not allow your knees to pinch.

The moment you pinch your knees, you have blocked that natural weight flow, and you stop your lower leg from doing its job. You must not allow that to happen.

When you fix your lower leg, then you can move onto what else is going on.

You're jumping ahead. See how much space is between your seat and your saddle? See how your crotch is over the pommel of your saddle? That is also another huge common fault in riders, which is called jumping ahead.

Because you are not allowing your lower leg to do its' job - the rest of your body cannot as well. Ripple effect.

You are anticipating the fence. You are riding the fence, and not your pony. You need to focus on what is under you, instead of what is ahead of you. Learn to ride your horses rhtym, learn to get your legs around his girth and learn to sit and wait for your pony to do his job.

You cannot jump that fence for him, that is his job. Your job is to get him to the base of the fence solidly, safely, rhythmically. Allow him to do his job.

Looks like you guys are having fun, which is wonderful to see.
     
    09-07-2009, 10:21 AM
  #9
Foal
That was a long reply but I really think what you suggested will help me. These pictures were taken almost 2 weeks ago and since then my coach told me to put more weight into my stirrups and heels, rather then the seat, when landing after the jump. I think this will probably help me when I am in the take off/going over the jump point as I will be having a lot more weight in my heels, instead of knees. And now that you have pointed out how I am clamping my knees while jumping I am going to put my lower leg on more when riding up to the jump since my pony has a tendency to hestitate and slow down a lot since he is easily scared/made nervous by new jumps he hasn't seen. I just started jumping about 2 years ago, maybe 2 1/2, and before that I only rode dressage/flatwork but I have now fallen in love with jumping and wish to get better at it!
     

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