Critique my jumping and my horse
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Horse Riding Critique

Critique my jumping and my horse

This is a discussion on Critique my jumping and my horse within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • My horse jumping
  • Developing good lower leg, horse jumping

View Poll Results: How good of a rider am I?
Amazing! 0 0%
Pretty Good 13 68.42%
So-So 4 21.05%
Not so hot.... 0 0%
Go back to the basics. 1 5.26%
Couldn't say 1 5.26%
Voters: 19. You may not vote on this poll

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    05-26-2008, 09:02 AM
  #1
Foal
Critique my jumping and my horse

Thanks!
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    05-26-2008, 12:45 PM
  #2
Yearling
Its hard to say from just one pic to judge how good a rider you are

But you look great your horse jumps well, has given it and extra foot :) do you show him/her?
     
    05-26-2008, 12:49 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Woah your horse over jumped that jump by alot!

Otherwise your position looks great!
     
    05-26-2008, 12:56 PM
  #4
Trained
I personally don't think the horse overjumped the jump by a lot.

You have a wonderful release :)
It looks like your lower leg slipped back just a bit

Other than that it's really hard to critique your position and your horse with only 1 photo. If you can get pictures of your horse standing square, we'd be able to give you a better critique :)
     
    05-26-2008, 01:00 PM
  #5
Green Broke
Your right appy. Its hard to tell since the standard is in the way so I had to study the picture. So I agree with appy about your horse not over jumping the jump.
     
    05-26-2008, 01:53 PM
  #6
Weanling
Hmm, have to agree with Ginger: that is an overjump. But not in the strictest sense, I suppose. The horse has jumped far higher than necessary, but only because the knees are dangling way down there in the 'babyish' style; if the knees were properly tucked up, he could jump about a foot lower. It might be that the height is just below what the horse is capable of, so he's not using himself to his full potential.

As for the rider...not bad!
Could afford to be a little less ahead of the jump, but nothing major at this height. You probably don't need to fold as extremely over such small fences, though (although you might if the horse always jumps that big!) Nice straight back and looking up. The main concern is that the lower leg has slipped back - this might be because you've jumped a little far ahead, or also because the saddle seems to have slipped back on the horse, but you need to have your leg underneath you to provide a solid base. Also, toes in! No, they don't need to be straight forward while jumping, but moreso than that. If they weren't turned out so much I think it would help keep the leg from slipping back.

I wasn't sure whether to mention the release. It's a very nice crest release, which I understand is what is taught by many instructors in the US? However, I'm in the UK, so I've always been taught an automatic release (straight line from elbow to bit, keeping the contact all the way through the jump) and that a crest release was something for novice jumpers at risk of socking a horse in the teeth or for when something goes wrong with a jump. So, in short, the crest release gives ME the impression of a novice jumper, and I almost voted lower, but then I remembered that's often how people in the US are taught (Thankyou, George Morris...) ;)

Disclaimer: hard to judge accurately from one pic!
     
    05-26-2008, 02:29 PM
  #7
Foal
Your lower leg has slid back, sending your upper body forward. Strengthen your base by keeping your inner leg on the horse, don't let it roll back. Your heel is down but your toe is out, opulling your contact off the horse.

Wait for your horse motion to close your hip angle over the jumps. I think youve thrown your uper body forward to stay with your horse . High headed horses tend to throw a rider back.

Your release needs some work. A crest release has two functions: to give a horse freedom while offering the rider support. You have given your horse his head but your hands are floating and not offering you any support at all. Press them into his crest and don't break your wrist.

Kyani: yes, many folks are taught to use a crest release in the US and I think that's awful. An automatic forces the rider to be reliant on his base and not on his horses neck. It makes a rider so much stronger and encorages independent use of hand and seat. True, its helpful for many beginners, but so many of them never move out of that stage and into an automatic release.
     
    05-26-2008, 03:14 PM
  #8
Foal
I suppose I ought to get a more recent picture. This was a year ago, and I am STILL working on keeping my leg from slipping back. I don't see why an over jump is such a bad thing, except when it is like this:

LOL. He had never jumped a coup before and lets just say I wasn't quite expecting that big of a jump.
About the release, at the time my horse was having issues getting over jumps (probably part of the reason he was overjumping so badly), and the last thing I was worried about was giving him too much rein. The release has improved, but thanks for the extra advice.
Any advice on the toe thing? I have tried and tried to "staighten out" but it feels extremely uncomfortable and awkward, and my akle seems to roll when I do it right....Any ideas?
Unfourtunatly I don't have any more recent pictures, but here are a couple more from the same show:


And here is one older picture, doesn't show much, but it is kinda funny, lol:
     
    05-26-2008, 03:59 PM
  #9
Weanling
I'm now convinced your saddle was too far back on the horse at that show - can't have been helping.

The overjump isn't necessarily a bad thing, just a bit of a waste of energy and looks a bit untidy, like he can't be too bothered working for the little fences. Also, if he was jumping the true height of those fences, you wouldn't have to fold half as much.

Your position is good overall and your release looks much less novicey in the rest of the pictures, but you do tend to jump ahead (I do, too) and let your leg slip back (I somehow manage to jump ahread while keeping my leg where it should be - STILL trying to figure that one out). It's just developing your seat. You need to close your hip angle, as Just Jump It said, and keep your bum over the seat of the saddle, not the pommel. Your weight should be pushed DOWNWARDS into your heels, whereas at the moment it looks like you're pressing OUTWARDS with them. It might be that your heels simply don't 'do' that position - mine certainly don't, but flexi stirrups have helped me a great deal.
The smallest picture easily shows you at your best.
     
    05-26-2008, 11:28 PM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyani
I'm now convinced your saddle was too far back on the horse at that show - can't have been helping.

The overjump isn't necessarily a bad thing, just a bit of a waste of energy and looks a bit untidy, like he can't be too bothered working for the little fences. Also, if he was jumping the true height of those fences, you wouldn't have to fold half as much.

Your position is good overall and your release looks much less novicey in the rest of the pictures, but you do tend to jump ahead (I do, too) and let your leg slip back (I somehow manage to jump ahread while keeping my leg where it should be - STILL trying to figure that one out). It's just developing your seat. You need to close your hip angle, as Just Jump It said, and keep your bum over the seat of the saddle, not the pommel. Your weight should be pushed DOWNWARDS into your heels, whereas at the moment it looks like you're pressing OUTWARDS with them. It might be that your heels simply don't 'do' that position - mine certainly don't, but flexi stirrups have helped me a great deal.
The smallest picture easily shows you at your best.
I agree. Although your horse is really nice =]
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:49 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0