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Critique of my lesson!

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  • "tom shires" horse trainer
  • Thomas shires bit o luck

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    08-18-2011, 02:06 AM
  #11
Yearling
Every time you rode by the Swedish looking oxer near the rail, I gasped a wee bit thinking you guys were going to try and jump it. Haha! He's got some pretty serious fences in that arena.
     
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    08-18-2011, 03:17 AM
  #12
Super Moderator
Congrats on training with Ralph. He has a wonderfully positive approach in his training, and is VERY good.

He rode for a while at a farm where I was a working student (in the late 70's) in Florida. It was Bit-O-Luck farm with Tom Shires. Tell him I said HI! It was a long time ago......

I have not had a chance to watch all the vids, but I will.
     
    08-18-2011, 07:53 AM
  #13
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Allison Finch    
Congrats on training with Ralph. He has a wonderfully positive approach in his training, and is VERY good.

He rode for a while at a farm where I was a working student (in the late 70's) in Florida. It was Bit-O-Luck farm with Tom Shires. Tell him I said HI! It was a long time ago......

I have not had a chance to watch all the vids, but I will.

Thanks Allison. Ill let him know, since his accident his memory is still not all there. But yes he is a great trainer and I LOVE him to death, I rode with his sister for a few years and that's how I met him. And its great training with him bc he used to ride my horse before I got him so he knows what we both need to get to where we need to go. Petey is not a naturally relaxed horse so that's what we're mainly working on now, he said there are a few minor things he wants to change with me as I get stronger, but Petey is a little more important right now.
     
    08-18-2011, 07:55 AM
  #14
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oxer    
every time you rode by the Swedish looking oxer near the rail, I gasped a wee bit thinking you guys were going to try and jump it. Haha! He's got some pretty serious fences in that arena.
lol yes he does.. and he told me at some point(when we get there) we will be jumping that stuff lol. When he used to have my horse he said he did some grand prix schooling with him, Petey was going to be his next Advanced Level XCountry horse, he was pretty sure he was going to take him to Rolex.. which still may happen at some point!
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    08-18-2011, 09:49 AM
  #15
Yearling
I was thinking the same thing about that ring. My crazyOTTB would freak out about all the stuff in there, he gets so excited when he sees jumps. Not to mention the random trees in the ring.

The only thing I did notice is that your horse doesnt have much bend into the corners. It seems like you have a great trainer and a ton of experience even after not riding for a year so I am sure that this is something that will happen along the road, it will help especially when you want to get into the jumping.
     
    08-18-2011, 10:01 AM
  #16
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicole25    

The only thing I did notice is that your horse doesn't have much bend into the corners.

The horse can't bend into any corner until the hollowness is resolved. This problem will limit the progress of this horse both in its jumping ability and suppleness to get around a course.

The other problem is that the rider's position can never be addressed until the horse they are riding is going correctly. Otherwise their position will always be compromised and I firmly believe that you allow a horse to continue is the wrong position, you are effectively training it to go in the wrong position.
     
    08-18-2011, 10:14 AM
  #17
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder    
The horse can't bend into any corner until the hollowness is resolved. This problem will limit the progress of this horse both in its jumping ability and suppleness to get around a course.

The other problem is that the rider's position can never be addressed until the horse they are riding is going correctly. Otherwise their position will always be compromised and I firmly believe that you allow a horse to continue is the wrong position, you are effectively training it to go in the wrong position.

Hence why we're training and taking lessons... you can't expect a miracle after one lesson! Yes he is stiff and doesnt bend but like I said it was only our first lesson after 10 months off, and before that there wasnt a lot of consistent riding due to my work schedule. We were focusing on relaxing him bc you can't have bend or work on the hollowness if your horse isnt relaxed... so now that he's beginning to relax the next lesson will be working on the hollowness and bending and then we will also be working on my position, which im also doing at home as well.

Im going to go by what my trainer is telling me as he is an accomplished 4* eventing rider and trainer and my horse was under his training for about a year and doing schooling Advanced level jumps and working on dressage... he has a natural jumping ability with power and scope but has issues on his flatwork due to being abused before my trainer or I got him and due to having a broken wither in his past so we have to go about working and training him a little bit differently.
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    08-18-2011, 10:56 AM
  #18
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hidalgo13    
It's easier for the rider if they don't have to work with all their horse's issues all at once.
You know what drives me bonkers, is when riders point fingers at the horse and it's all about the "horses issues"

Our horses reflect 100% of what we do in the saddle, or lack there of. Instead of blaming the horse and the "horses issues" why not stop and look at the rider.

As Ian Millar says "A good rider blames themselves, a poor rider blames their horse"

So if the horse is upside down, stiff and not flexable - look at the rider! You have to be correct, for the horse to be correct. You have to be put together and using yourself properly, in order for your horse to use themselves properly. Your out, your horse is out.

I lose respect for riders, when they blame their horses. As Reiner Klimke says "It isn't our horses job to understand our language, it is our job to understand theirs so that we can be as clear as we possibly can, so that they can answer us to the best of their abilities."
haleylvsshammy likes this.
     
    08-18-2011, 11:30 AM
  #19
Started
Sorry... I know that's what it sounded like, but I didn't mean for it to sound like it was all her horses fault and she was a perfect rider. I completely agree with you MIEventer that we shouldn't blame the horse. What I wanted to say was they had a bunch of things to work on, and it's easier for them to concentrate on one thing rather than try to get everything right all at once. Thank you for pointing it out. I was very wrong in my wording.
     
    08-18-2011, 11:45 AM
  #20
Trained
It's ok Hidalgo, and thank you for clarifying. No hard feelings.

You are right, there is only 1 thing that the coach can work on, even same goes at clinics.

On that note, I firmly believe that the coach has to correct the rider, before the horse can reflect.
     

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