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Critique on potential buy

This is a discussion on Critique on potential buy within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        08-20-2008, 08:01 AM
      #11
    Super Moderator
    I think it's 2 people in a horse costume!

    Actually, I see what everyone is saying about the legs, I dont' know alot about how certain conformations effect on horses. The front legs may not cause any problems, does anyone know? He looks sweet. I'd look at him....
         
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        08-20-2008, 12:51 PM
      #12
    Foal
    If he's just over at the knees its really not that bad of a fault. In all honesty its more of a cosmetic ugly looking fault then anything. It does make for a slightly shorter stride because the knee won't flex as far. Some people actually prefer a horse that is slightly over as when they are in movement it puts less force on the knees. So if you can live with looking at it then you aren't going to have issues with it. Compare to the opposite being back at the knee which will cause much more strain on the leg. Which in turn leads to a lame horse before long.

    If you have ever looked at my horse Tucker he is noticeably over at the knee. This has never been an issue under saddle nor has he ever taken a lame step due to it.

    Quote:
    Over at the knees is the most common of two structural deviations that exist in the knees of horses when viewed from the side. This condition is commonly referred to as buck-kneed. This is a forward deviation in which the knee is set too far forward in relation to the leg. Even though over at the knees is a structural fault, many horses with this condition have long, productive performance careers.
    Quote:
    by: William Moyer, DVM

    Being over in the knees (also called bucked knees, knee sprung, or goat knees) describes a conformation in which the knees are forward of the vertical plane formed by the radius above and cannon bone below. Generally this conformational problem is more favorable with regard to soundness than its opposite, back in the knees (also called calf knees or sheep knees). Most that I have seen were present at birth and usually, but obviously not always, corrected before one year of age.
         
        08-20-2008, 02:14 PM
      #13
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ArticMyst
    If he's just over at the knees its really not that bad of a fault. In all honesty its more of a cosmetic ugly looking fault then anything. It does make for a slightly shorter stride because the knee won't flex as far. Some people actually prefer a horse that is slightly over as when they are in movement it puts less force on the knees. So if you can live with looking at it then you aren't going to have issues with it. Compare to the opposite being back at the knee which will cause much more strain on the leg. Which in turn leads to a lame horse before long.

    If you have ever looked at my horse Tucker he is noticeably over at the knee. This has never been an issue under saddle nor has he ever taken a lame step due to it.

    Quote:
    Over at the knees is the most common of two structural deviations that exist in the knees of horses when viewed from the side. This condition is commonly referred to as buck-kneed. This is a forward deviation in which the knee is set too far forward in relation to the leg. Even though over at the knees is a structural fault, many horses with this condition have long, productive performance careers.
    Quote:
    by: William Moyer, DVM

    Being over in the knees (also called bucked knees, knee sprung, or goat knees) describes a conformation in which the knees are forward of the vertical plane formed by the radius above and cannon bone below. Generally this conformational problem is more favorable with regard to soundness than its opposite, back in the knees (also called calf knees or sheep knees). Most that I have seen were present at birth and usually, but obviously not always, corrected before one year of age.
    Very cool... I just learned something new! I think he's a pretty cute horse..... Unless you are planning to show in rated shows, I'm all for kind and safe first Beauty second... although, I think he's cute...
         

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