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Critique rider and horse at walk please.

This is a discussion on Critique rider and horse at walk please. within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        03-20-2011, 03:16 PM
      #11
    Foal
    [quote]I found that I could slow my TB down a lot using a lot of half halts and full halts. If he got too fast, I'd half halt and if he changed gait, we'd halt. Eventually I'd be able to feel when he was thinking of rushing so I'd half halt. Eventually he learnt that as much as he tried, I wasn't going to let him go at "his pace" (aka gallop at breakneck speed).

    Read more: http://www.horseforum.com/horse-ridi...M52[/QUOTE]

    I have no idea why but I can't seem to get a half halt to go through at the walk (my trainer says I get beautiful ones where she really sinks at the trot) but there seems to be a disconnect at the walk :/ still trying to figure out how my body works, I finally understood what a half halt was about 5 months ago and then applying it was a challenge, Lucy will only respond if I ask correctly (in that regards she is a tough teacher ). I actually talk to her a lot (except of course in this video ). When I was really working with her to get to halt I would say good girl everytime she halted as asked. She decided that whenever I said good girl that meant HALT! That was a little difficult to train out of her lol.

    [QUOTE]Have you tried doing an exercise where you change what you're doing every 10 strides?

    Read more: http://www.horseforum.com/horse-ridi...NAH[/QUOTE]

    Yes, she is however, the only horse I have ever ridden (granted I haven't ridden a huge variety) that could listen and obey (except the relaxing part) you while feeling like she could literally explode underneath you. With her ability to divide her attention between my aids and freaking out it is very difficult (not impossible). Anyways I wasn't trying to stress her out with doing that because she took a nasty fall playing in the field and is sore (I thought I had written this, sorry) vet came out and said I could ride at a walk only to help the muscles, which was fine because I was doing that anyways .

    [QUOTE]Try alternating your legs. Instead of putting both legs on at the same time, when she steps forward with her left leg, put yours on and the same for the right. Also hold with the reins - flutter with your fingers if she starts to brace against them. You can also try asking for more flexion and bend.


    Read more: http://www.horseforum.com/horse-ridi...Zsi[/QUOTE]

    I will see how she is feeling next ride :)


    [QUOTE]And don't worry, one day you'll be able to contain and use that energy and forwardness that she has and it will make your ride so much better! My gelding went from getting 50% and comments like "tense, rushy horse, uneven in paces (he "hops" when excited)" to getting 72% and comments like "calm, attentive, eager horse" once I learnt to contain and use the energy. ;) You'll love her so much more when you find that magic 'click' when it all comes together perfectly!

    Read more: http://www.horseforum.com/horse-ridi...XYn[/QUOTE]

    Thanks! One of the things I love abut her is that she is forward, I think the way you can channel that energy is amazing :) sounds like you agree
    P.s congrats on the improvements ^.^


    [QUOTE]
    I'd agree on the shoulders. You're alignment isn't bad, and it might be your physical make up, but it looks as though your shoulders are slumped / slouched. Not really rolled forward, but perhaps too loose? I also agree with thinking of pulling your shoulder blades together, as this will give you a bit more self carriage in your upper body. It might also be a result of shallow breathing. Take nice, regular deep breaths that go all the way down, past your belly button. That should give you a bit of lift in your chest & shoulders. I'm far from an expert, just throwing out a few ideas!!
    __________________



    Read more: http://www.horseforum.com/horse-ridi...xyz[/QUOTE]

    Hmm, the way you described the way I slouch made me think it MIGHT be because I was trying to relax and instead of doing it correctly I kind of slumped giving myelf the illusion of softness. I don't remember how I was breathing but that is also a good guess, sometimes when I concentrate to hard I forget to breathe O.o Sometimes when other people phrase it differently I can figure out what I did in my head. Thanks!

    [QUOTE]All I have to say is your position looks great. You should put your hands down a bit tho and relax your arms. You could put your shoulders back a bit more as mentioned about, but great start!

    Read more: http://www.horseforum.com/horse-ridi...uNS[/QUOTE]

    Thank you very much, I watched the video again and maybe because of the lighting it is hard to tell? I think that if I put my hands down it might disrupt the line with her mouth? Can anyone else see it better? I definitely see the stiffness now if I could only magically make it disappear lol. Thanks!

    [QUOTE]She goes along on the edge of thinking that she will have to do something defensive. It is evident in the shape of her neck and her head carriege. She also strides a bit short in front and might even be the tiniest bit off in her front right foot.

    Read more: http://www.horseforum.com/horse-ridi...En8[/QUOTE]

    You are correct when I first got her she was soooooo sure I was going to rip her face off poor baby :/ . My trainer said it looked like she was expecting me to goose her and then haul on her face. Yes she is a little off (vet said I needed to walk her, she had a nasty spill playing) sorry I thought I put that in the original novel .

    Quote:
    Back to you. You are not too far on your girlie parts. You can, however, scoot a half inch forward in the saddle and breathe out and relax your buttock more so that the flesh can ease you down deeper into the saddle. Currently you ride very lightly, as if you were riding a green hrose. I think you can ease a bit more weight onto Lucy. In fact, you can use this kind of "heavyness" to slow her down if she even thinks about pacing or jigging. You will breathe out long and slow, think of dragging your heels on the ground and anchoring her in deep mud and think EASY. So, while using this to slow her a bit, you can ask for more engagement of her hind by the tiniest bit more leg AND start taking up more rein.



    Read more: Critique rider and horse at walk please.
    I love your descriptions! Very easy to understand! My trainer is always telling me I need to put more weight on her, however I can't seem to do it consistently. I am getting better at it though!

    [QUOTE]I think you have done a tremendous job of following this flighty horse's mouth in a very simpathetic manner that has built her trust in your hand. That was and is essential. NOW, you can start building her trust in you having more contact so that you will better be able to create impulsion with push from behind INTO your hand.



    Read more: http://www.horseforum.com/horse-ridi...Gvh[/QUOTE]

    This is probably the best compliment I have had nice to see that I was able to accomplish something with a horse everyone thought could never trust a riders hands again. I know we both have a long way to go, but still it was really nice to read

    [QUOTE]Start taking up the rein and seeing if you can get that flexion in the Poll we all want, When you get it, release. Start working on getting her to stretch down and forward, then back up into a medium walk frame, then on a free walk, then medium, then halt, then drop the reins. What that is is (and do it in any order you like) is just longitudinally stretching and compacting and releasing, so that she gets used to the rein contact becoming more, then less then more and then loose. All points of contact become ok because she trusts that none will last forever and none will be painful.



    Read more: http://www.horseforum.com/horse-ridi...6Uc[/QUOTE]

    I will try these and I bought a book of simple stretching excercises and patterns for us to do and I can't wait to try them out! (it's not just Lucy who has been out of shape lol)

    [QUOTE]You have the hands and seat to go far.

    Read more: http://www.horseforum.com/horse-ridi...wme[/QUOTE]

    Thank you, I have read a lot of your posts and I really respect you opinion.

    Okayyyyy that was a novel so sorry if I didn't get everything! I really apprieciate it!
         
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        03-20-2011, 03:18 PM
      #12
    Foal
    Ugh, that that post was a mess. Hopefully the replies get back to the right people :d
         
        03-20-2011, 03:24 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by churumbeque    
    I would squeeze your legs and push her up into the bridle and getting her stepping under herself and walking out. She looks like she is stepping short and this should help her relax, collect and round up.
    I am going to start working on getting the her to lengthen her stride, for some reason this has been a weird thing for me to learn and I don't seem to be able to do it correctly and Lucy will not respond unless I do. Do you have any tips?

    The only thing I am working with her now is long and low I believe it is called? I think it is still to early to ask for her to round and collect in some aspects I am treating her like a green horse Thanks for you input!
         
        03-20-2011, 11:08 PM
      #14
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ilovelucy    
    I am going to start working on getting the her to lengthen her stride, for some reason this has been a weird thing for me to learn and I don't seem to be able to do it correctly and Lucy will not respond unless I do. Do you have any tips?

    The only thing I am working with her now is long and low I believe it is called? I think it is still to early to ask for her to round and collect in some aspects I am treating her like a green horse Thanks for you input!
    I do alot of ground work to get them under them self so you can see it. With lunging you have to make sure they stay in gait and then push them forward with the whip. I do the same with longe lining. It takes alot of practice
         
        03-20-2011, 11:31 PM
      #15
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by churumbeque    
    I do alot of ground work to get them under them self so you can see it. With lunging you have to make sure they stay in gait and then push them forward with the whip. I do the same with longe lining. It takes alot of practice
    Since I switched disciplines about a year I haven't really done any lunging with her (before it was more of a join up) and looking back at that I am wondering if lunging without help would do more harm then good :/
    I also have a feeling that longe lining her would not go over well with her since I don't have experience (I worked so hard to soften her mouth I don't want to risk it trying to learn how.)

    However, I do have some questions

    1. Do you free lunge? If not how?

    2. How would you make her stay at a gait from the ground while pushing from behind (with Lucy a whip isn't needed lol she would break into a canter if I stood "strong")

    Thanks!
         
        03-20-2011, 11:41 PM
      #16
    Banned
    I didn't read all of the responses as I am feeling sleepy, so I apologize if I am repeating anything.

    It should be a straight line from your elbow > hand > horses mouth, it is lagging a little in the reins, so pick your hands up a bit.

    My posture is terrible on and off a horse, so you look better than I do! :)

    And heals down a little more


    Other than that, you look great! Keep up the good work.
         
        03-21-2011, 01:42 AM
      #17
    Super Moderator
    Lucy,

    I would actually recommend against lunging on a line. Right now you have a horse that is worried about contact. You have such a good feel for how much she can take that I think Lucy will stay with you much better if you are on her back than if she is running around on a line. Also, with her front right (was that where she hurt? ) being off, lunging would not be good.

    I can almost feel that horse under me. I swear, I know how she has a balance point that is very thin, it takes almost nothing to push her over the line, where she feels she has to "do something!" and then she goes beyond what you asked. Very challengeing to get more lengthingin of stride without her leaping to :change gait. So, if you spend a lot of time leggin her, she will find it hard because she doesnt' yet know how to stay in between your aids. A more trained horse can accept that leg on and some increased rein contact means step under more WHILE not necessarily leapping past "more engaged but same gait" to " GO!"
    She strikes me as a hrose that rides primarily from the seat. If you go putting a lot of leg on, especially every other stride as many instructors ask, you will really stress her and will lose that fine place where you are keeping her just on the edge of what she can tolerate and stay relaxed. Your intuition is telling you this, and for a reason.

    However, I also get a feeling that she is ready for a bit of a stretching of what she can tolerate. I still think working on longitudinal flexing is good. If you do know how to round pen freely, you could try that. It doesn't have to be a big run aorund join up thingy

    Also, start doing lots of transitions and smaller circles and if things feel right, more backing up. Give lots of big releases. Like to the buckle! Ride her around in the arena on the buckle from timeto time. Make if fun and gamelike.
    Ps

    Do work, little by little, in getting her comfortable with your leg being more than passive. You can move your leg around when you are just standing there resting. Like ,, turn in your saddle and look behind you. Shake your legs in a "sloppy" manner. Get her to tolerate random leg movements. Start experimenting with putting one leg on and see if you can get her to take one step over. If she is nervous about leg contact, then you would want to have lots of leg movement to get her used to it. Not all at once, tho.

    Also, see if she moves off forward, like from halt to walk, better from applying one leg or both. I actually use ONE leg for forward if the horse is light. I will put both on if he is ignoring me but Mac is so light that one leg, kind of brushing his side is enough to move him forward.
         
        03-21-2011, 08:11 AM
      #18
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AlexS    
    I didn't read all of the responses as I am feeling sleepy, so I apologize if I am repeating anything.

    It should be a straight line from your elbow > hand > horses mouth, it is lagging a little in the reins, so pick your hands up a bit.

    My posture is terrible on and off a horse, so you look better than I do! :)

    And heals down a little more



    Other than that, you look great! Keep up the good work.

    Thank you! I can't wait until I can have another ride to try out some of this stuff!
         
        03-21-2011, 08:36 AM
      #19
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinyliny    
    Lucy,

    I would actually recommend against lunging on a line. Right now you have a horse that is worried about contact. You have such a good feel for how much she can take that I think Lucy will stay with you much better if you are on her back than if she is running around on a line. Also, with her front right (was that where she hurt? ) being off, lunging would not be good.

    I hadn't intended on actually lunging her for several reasons, that being one of them and another was the vet didn't want small circles (he is coming out again today so we will see how she is doing). However, I like to think about and visualize other training methods the questions I asked Chur. Were ones that I was curious about how people dealt with, or if they simply kept the horse of the line like I do. I know each horse is different and it is hard to tell over the internet, I work with her and I do know that it woud be taking steps backwards AT THIS POINT. Maybe in the future I will be able to

    I can almost feel that horse under me. I swear, I know how she has a balance point that is very thin, it takes almost nothing to push her over the line, where she feels she has to "do something!" and then she goes beyond what you asked. Very challengeing to get more lengthingin of stride without her leaping to :change gait. So, if you spend a lot of time leggin her, she will find it hard because she doesnt' yet know how to stay in between your aids. A more trained horse can accept that leg on and some increased rein contact means step under more WHILE not necessarily leapping past "more engaged but same gait" to " GO!"
    She strikes me as a hrose that rides primarily from the seat. If you go putting a lot of leg on, especially every other stride as many instructors ask, you will really stress her and will lose that fine place where you are keeping her just on the edge of what she can tolerate and stay relaxed. Your intuition is telling you this, and for a reason.

    You hit the nail on the head, that is her mentality plus, her conformation (will) make it easier for her to collect but harder to extend. She is definitely a horse you have to ride from your seat, my trainer has been super good about working with that.

    However, I also get a feeling that she is ready for a bit of a stretching of what she can tolerate. I still think working on longitudinal flexing is good. If you do know how to round pen freely, you could try that. It doesn't have to be a big run aorund join up thingy

    I do know how to roundpen, but I don't think I should try with Lucy without help the first one or two times.



    Also, start doing lots of transitions and smaller circles and if things feel right, more backing up. Give lots of big releases. Like to the buckle! Ride her around in the arena on the buckle from timeto time. Make if fun and gamelike.

    I can't do smaller circles right now, but the others stuff I have been doing (I haven't really played with the back up to much) I actually start and end our ride with a "doodling" buckle walk and stretches (of cours this has been fairly recent but I think it has been a big contribution to her massive improvement)

    Ps

    Do work, little by little, in getting her comfortable with your leg being more than passive. You can move your leg around when you are just standing there resting. Like ,, turn in your saddle and look behind you. Shake your legs in a "sloppy" manner. Get her to tolerate random leg movements. Start experimenting with putting one leg on and see if you can get her to take one step over. If she is nervous about leg contact, then you would want to have lots of leg movement to get her used to it. Not all at once, tho.

    I did try to "desensitize" her to leg movement before, but I am thinking that was back when I THOUGHT I knew what I was doing and probably did more harm then good O.o I could try again now that I have a better understanding

    Also, see if she moves off forward, like from halt to walk, better from applying one leg or both. I actually use ONE leg for forward if the horse is light. I will put both on if he is ignoring me but Mac is so light that one leg, kind of brushing his side is enough to move him forward.
    I have been "scooping" her up into the walk with my seat, I thought you used the lightest aid possible but then I am kind of floating around trying to gather the correct information about these things

    Thanks for you reply!
         
        03-21-2011, 09:16 AM
      #20
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ilovelucy    
    Since I switched disciplines about a year I haven't really done any lunging with her (before it was more of a join up) and looking back at that I am wondering if lunging without help would do more harm then good :/
    I also have a feeling that longe lining her would not go over well with her since I don't have experience (I worked so hard to soften her mouth I don't want to risk it trying to learn how.)

    However, I do have some questions

    1. Do you free lunge? If not how?

    2. How would you make her stay at a gait from the ground while pushing from behind (with Lucy a whip isn't needed lol she would break into a canter if I stood "strong")

    Thanks!
    If you are worried about your hands then free lunge in a round pen or arena. I taught my horse to not change gaits unless I tell her to. I work alot off voice. I say "alright Flash walk" in a upbeat voice to go to the next gait, when I want her to go down a gait I say " now flash walk" In a low toned voice to slooooow down.
    I just use the whip as needed so not much pressure if not needed. When walking you can also say "walk on or step up to get them going faster in a upbeat voice
         

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