Critique Riding
 
 

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Critique Riding

This is a discussion on Critique Riding within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        01-30-2008, 09:15 PM
      #1
    Weanling
    Critique Riding

    I know it's only two pictures, but I will get more -- I promise!
    These were both taken last year, and I know what I'm doing wrong. I'd just like to know your opinion.



    Please note that I know I have no realese. This horse has a huge jump, and he's really spooky. He's a spazz, but I love him.
         
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        01-30-2008, 09:21 PM
      #2
    Showing
    First Pic:

    Horse "chipped" the fence (came too close to the jump, so had to "pop" it) Try and stay a little closer to your tack and let your elbows release.

    Second pic:

    Hard to tell from this angle, but have less of an angle between your hips and torso, and sink a little bit further into your tack, I.e. Bend forward more so you're not out of your tack that much. Might want to bring your heel back underneath you a little. Again, the release, but you knew that already.

    Goodness you have long legs! I could be completely wrong, but maybe shortening your stirrups in the second pic? Anyways, you look good other than that.
         
        01-30-2008, 09:59 PM
      #3
    Weanling
    Thanks.
    Yeah, the first picture was on a lesson horse that was as lazy as heck.

    The second picture I was really riding horribly, espically the releases in that lesson.
    Ha, I have average legs, I guess. Yeah, I probaly should have shortened my stirrups.
         
        01-31-2008, 02:35 AM
      #4
    Green Broke
    They're both kind of hard to see due to the angle and the blurry-ness (is that a word?)

    The first picture: You're pinching your horse with your knees, which has caused your lower leg to slip back. (Your stirrup should be hanging perpindicular to the ground) This has also caused the weight to come off of your heel. When you are jumping it is crucial to keep even thigh/knee/calf contact, flexible ankles with your weight in your heels. You then allow your horse to jump up to you, not you jump "for your horse" as so many people tend to do! Your upper body position is nice and flat, not laying on your horse's neck. You're a touch more out of the saddle then you need to be but as close as your horse left to fence, it's no surprise!

    The second is even harder to see. CUTE pony though! (how do you release through all that mane?!) Looks like your too high out of the saddle, again from jumping 'for your horse' instead of allowing him to come up to you. Something's not quite right about your leg but I can't tell exactly what. I think it's that your ankles look stiff and that your heel isn't down enough? Hard to tell though.

    I've jumped spazzy spooky ponies and they are tough! But as I'm sure you've heard a million times, if you catch them in the mouth when you go over you're going to make a stopper out of him. I'd work a lot on building up your foundation and then work towards learning an "automatic release". A "crest release" is what you see the majority of riders do, keeping your hands resting on your horse's crest for balance. An auto release is when you lower your hands about 4 inches and keep a straight line from the bit through your elbow as your hands follow his mouth and guide him over the jump. You MUST first have a firm foundation otherwise you'll just be pulling on him. It's a much more advanced technique but wonderful for jumpers or horses that need that extra control.

    Great pics!
         
        01-31-2008, 12:29 PM
      #5
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by upnover
    They're both kind of hard to see due to the angle and the blurry-ness (is that a word?)

    The first picture: You're pinching your horse with your knees, which has caused your lower leg to slip back. (Your stirrup should be hanging perpindicular to the ground) This has also caused the weight to come off of your heel. When you are jumping it is crucial to keep even thigh/knee/calf contact, flexible ankles with your weight in your heels. You then allow your horse to jump up to you, not you jump "for your horse" as so many people tend to do! Your upper body position is nice and flat, not laying on your horse's neck. You're a touch more out of the saddle then you need to be but as close as your horse left to fence, it's no surprise!

    The second is even harder to see. CUTE pony though! (how do you release through all that mane?!) Looks like your too high out of the saddle, again from jumping 'for your horse' instead of allowing him to come up to you. Something's not quite right about your leg but I can't tell exactly what. I think it's that your ankles look stiff and that your heel isn't down enough? Hard to tell though.

    I've jumped spazzy spooky ponies and they are tough! But as I'm sure you've heard a million times, if you catch them in the mouth when you go over you're going to make a stopper out of him. I'd work a lot on building up your foundation and then work towards learning an "automatic release". A "crest release" is what you see the majority of riders do, keeping your hands resting on your horse's crest for balance. An auto release is when you lower your hands about 4 inches and keep a straight line from the bit through your elbow as your hands follow his mouth and guide him over the jump. You MUST first have a firm foundation otherwise you'll just be pulling on him. It's a much more advanced technique but wonderful for jumpers or horses that need that extra control.

    Great pics!
    agreed. I always get here too late.lol
         
        01-31-2008, 02:22 PM
      #6
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by upnover
    They're both kind of hard to see due to the angle and the blurry-ness (is that a word?)

    The first picture: You're pinching your horse with your knees, which has caused your lower leg to slip back. (Your stirrup should be hanging perpindicular to the ground) This has also caused the weight to come off of your heel. When you are jumping it is crucial to keep even thigh/knee/calf contact, flexible ankles with your weight in your heels. You then allow your horse to jump up to you, not you jump "for your horse" as so many people tend to do! Your upper body position is nice and flat, not laying on your horse's neck. You're a touch more out of the saddle then you need to be but as close as your horse left to fence, it's no surprise!

    The second is even harder to see. CUTE pony though! (how do you release through all that mane?!) Looks like your too high out of the saddle, again from jumping 'for your horse' instead of allowing him to come up to you. Something's not quite right about your leg but I can't tell exactly what. I think it's that your ankles look stiff and that your heel isn't down enough? Hard to tell though.

    I've jumped spazzy spooky ponies and they are tough! But as I'm sure you've heard a million times, if you catch them in the mouth when you go over you're going to make a stopper out of him. I'd work a lot on building up your foundation and then work towards learning an "automatic release". A "crest release" is what you see the majority of riders do, keeping your hands resting on your horse's crest for balance. An auto release is when you lower your hands about 4 inches and keep a straight line from the bit through your elbow as your hands follow his mouth and guide him over the jump. You MUST first have a firm foundation otherwise you'll just be pulling on him. It's a much more advanced technique but wonderful for jumpers or horses that need that extra control.

    Great pics!
    Thanks so much! I will definitely keep this in mind next time I jump - if that'll be anytime soon...
         
        02-02-2008, 12:27 PM
      #7
    Weanling
    If the second one was a spazz, like the kind one of mine is, id relase with a shorter rien, but come back quicker. If you don't relase with a "spazzy" horse, its possible that your bit may bop him in the mouth setting him off. That happened to someone were I ride and it resulted in a bad sowllen black eye. Also, if he has a huge jump, trust me, with a 17 hand horse I ride that has that jump too, it feels MUCH better to relase. If he spazzes after the fence that may be why. If he has a huge jump and you get him in the mouth coming down because you don't relase. Hop I could help...good luck with him! :)

    PS. CUTE PONIES!!!
         
        02-02-2008, 03:01 PM
      #8
    Weanling
    Thanks!
    The Haflinger isn't my pony, I've ridden him like five times. Ha, his trot is the best, though.
    Anyway, it was our first day actually jumping (my god, you don't even want to see a video of our first jump, although I have it...it's very funny - you'll get a great laugh, yet feel bad for the pony!). However, I know I don't have an excuse...I haven't jumped for a while (as I stated above) either.
         
        02-02-2008, 06:22 PM
      #9
    Weanling
    Hehe that's fine!!! He's a cuuutteee little pony!!!! He looks like he's got a big personality from the pic lol
         

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