Critique Rupert's jump! =]
 
 

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Critique Rupert's jump! =]

This is a discussion on Critique Rupert's jump! =] within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        03-16-2009, 07:39 PM
      #1
    Yearling
    Critique Rupert's jump! =]

    This isn't me on him.. So no comments about the riding. .
    But I've kinda been iffy about Rupert's jump lately. How do you think he looks? We've been working jumping so I wanna know if I have to fix anything.
    This jump is about 2'3..


    He tends to overjump, but he looks pretty accurate with this one..
         
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        03-16-2009, 08:06 PM
      #2
    Started
    Honestly from what I can see it looks like he's pretty sloppy as far as jumping goes. His hind end is very uneven, showing me that he's not sure how to use himself and as a result he's throwing his upper body over the fences. I'm not at ALL a fan of putting a martingale on a green horse OF, especially not a standing one, so my first recommendation is to remove that. Next, he needs a more confident rider to help him learn to use himself and gain confidence over fences.

    I know you said that isn't you riding, however it's important to point out that the rider ABSOLUTELY affects how the horse will jump. In this case the rider is lacking a release and holding the horse in the face. As a result, the horse's ears are pinned, his facial expression is a rather unhappy one, and he's trying to both safely jump while at the same time not being allowed to properly use himself over fences.

    Not sure who the rider is, but if he was my horse, they would be lessoning with a trainer on a different horse while this horse learns confidence and balance over small fences in the form of gymnastic exercises that include both trot poles as well as small fences no higher than 2' of varying widths and as he gets more experienced, distances.

    In addition, based on what you said about the horse tending to overjump, I have a feeling that he's both lacking in hind end as well as perhaps avoiding the rider (if anyone else rides him like the one pictured OR if the rider pictured rides him regularly, he's learned that he needs to avoid the fence as well as avoid the strong pressure on his face - making jumping a not so great experience). Be careful as with continued rides like this, it's likely a matter of time before he starts to refuse as right now this jump (in the picture) is an example of how to teach a horse to dislike jumping - with the common outcome being refusals since actually jumping as above results in him being held in the mouth/caught in the mouth.

    Looks to me overall like the horse has a lot of work to do on his form and the rider needs a quiet packer so that she can work on her own position and learn to ride with a much more secure leg/seat and develop an independent hand over the fences so as to not interfere with her horse. The rider would be best suited for a well school jumping lesson horse with a trainer, and the horse looks to need some rides with an advanced/professional rider to teach him how to engage the hind end first on the flat, and then tighten up his form over fences.
         
        03-16-2009, 10:16 PM
      #3
    Weanling
    Okay so heres my opinion...
    As the above poster stated, his hind end is lacking and his fornt end is sloppy. He obviously doesnt want to be jumping right now because of the dusposition on his face. However, it does look like he chipped in an extra stride and got a bit close to that jump. He looks like he needs more flat training, working on suppling and transitions, as well as acceptance of the bit.
    If I were you, I would make sure I approach the fence with plenty of energy, and looking up and ahead. Also make sure you release is better than the rider in the pictures.
    From other pictures I've seen...I know Ruperts a sweet heart, but that in that pic he looks really unhappy.

    Hope everything goes well!
    E
         
        03-17-2009, 09:19 PM
      #4
    Green Broke
    I agree with both of the above posters.

    Although it is a small jump, a good jumper would not be that sloppy, even over a two foot fence. His knee is frankly, dangerous. I know this because I used to have a mare that did that and I was so thankful when someone told me that she was dangerous. It's hard to accept but it's kind of a need-to-know type thing for your (and your horse's) safety.

    His expression is quite nappy and he doesn't appear to be having fun. He also has a standing martingale on his face which probably doesn't help

    Hope all goes well!
         
        03-17-2009, 09:31 PM
      #5
    Yearling
    Jessica actually rides him very well, but you're definitely right that she needs to release. Rupert is 20x better when you give him his head.
    He isn't green, actually. He's about 12 and an x-show horse, actually used to do some fox hunting..
    He needs the martin gale because he pulls his head up/down a lot. I might start trying him without the martin gale, but he does need it sometimes..
    He has breating problems and this was a pretty long course, so he wasn't too pleased with having to run around and around. I don't show him[ this was a show ] and when I ride him, we take plenty of breaks, so that's pretty much solved.
    He does lack a lot of confidence though, he bought him after a while out of work.. But he's getting way better and is really excited to see the fences most of the time now.
    I have him with a trainer twice a week, and we've only been doing small things, but I'm going to ask about getting him schooled a bit more often. .

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CJ82Sky    
    Honestly from what I can see it looks like he's pretty sloppy as far as jumping goes. His hind end is very uneven, showing me that he's not sure how to use himself and as a result he's throwing his upper body over the fences. I'm not at ALL a fan of putting a martingale on a green horse OF, especially not a standing one, so my first recommendation is to remove that. Next, he needs a more confident rider to help him learn to use himself and gain confidence over fences.

    I know you said that isn't you riding, however it's important to point out that the rider ABSOLUTELY affects how the horse will jump. In this case the rider is lacking a release and holding the horse in the face. As a result, the horse's ears are pinned, his facial expression is a rather unhappy one, and he's trying to both safely jump while at the same time not being allowed to properly use himself over fences.

    Not sure who the rider is, but if he was my horse, they would be lessoning with a trainer on a different horse while this horse learns confidence and balance over small fences in the form of gymnastic exercises that include both trot poles as well as small fences no higher than 2' of varying widths and as he gets more experienced, distances.

    In addition, based on what you said about the horse tending to overjump, I have a feeling that he's both lacking in hind end as well as perhaps avoiding the rider (if anyone else rides him like the one pictured OR if the rider pictured rides him regularly, he's learned that he needs to avoid the fence as well as avoid the strong pressure on his face - making jumping a not so great experience). Be careful as with continued rides like this, it's likely a matter of time before he starts to refuse as right now this jump (in the picture) is an example of how to teach a horse to dislike jumping - with the common outcome being refusals since actually jumping as above results in him being held in the mouth/caught in the mouth.

    Looks to me overall like the horse has a lot of work to do on his form and the rider needs a quiet packer so that she can work on her own position and learn to ride with a much more secure leg/seat and develop an independent hand over the fences so as to not interfere with her horse. The rider would be best suited for a well school jumping lesson horse with a trainer, and the horse looks to need some rides with an advanced/professional rider to teach him how to engage the hind end first on the flat, and then tighten up his form over fences.
         
        03-17-2009, 09:34 PM
      #6
    Yearling
    We're working with him on transitions, he's definitely gotten better.
    His stride is was very sloppy when we started, he'd pick up his canter right before the jump and nearly crash into it- but he NEVER refuses.
    This girl was working him way too hard at this show (I disagree on showing him at all. He needs to be walked out a lot, and she had him cantering around and around and around without any breaks over 5 minutes.) and he was ridden in about four more classes afterward, maybe more, and around 3 before. He wasn't too satisfied and VERY tired.
    We need to work on his form.. he always forgets his back legs and kinda tosses himself over the jumps.
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by eventnwithwinston    
    Okay so heres my opinion...
    As the above poster stated, his hind end is lacking and his fornt end is sloppy. He obviously doesnt want to be jumping right now because of the dusposition on his face. However, it does look like he chipped in an extra stride and got a bit close to that jump. He looks like he needs more flat training, working on suppling and transitions, as well as acceptance of the bit.
    If I were you, I would make sure I approach the fence with plenty of energy, and looking up and ahead. Also make sure you release is better than the rider in the pictures.
    From other pictures I've seen...I know Ruperts a sweet heart, but that in that pic he looks really unhappy.

    Hope everything goes well!
    E
         
        03-17-2009, 09:36 PM
      #7
    Yearling
    Basically the same response as bore here..
    He just needs a lot of rein, but the martin gale is totally nessecary. He will buck and gallop off, even being the easily-tired out horse that he is.
    He was being way overworked that day, but he got a two week break afterward..
    She should have released him a ton more..
    But yeah, so there were reasons for his bad mood.
    We're working with him on the whole slob-of-a-jump thing.
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by eventerdrew    
    I agree with both of the above posters.

    Although it is a small jump, a good jumper would not be that sloppy, even over a two foot fence. His knee is frankly, dangerous. I know this because I used to have a mare that did that and I was so thankful when someone told me that she was dangerous. It's hard to accept but it's kind of a need-to-know type thing for your (and your horse's) safety.

    His expression is quite nappy and he doesn't appear to be having fun. He also has a standing martingale on his face which probably doesn't help

    Hope all goes well!
         
        03-17-2009, 09:38 PM
      #8
    Yearling
    [me and these double posts.. =P]
    The whole knee thing kind of scares me. He could just.. fall over at any minute.
         
        03-17-2009, 09:47 PM
      #9
    Trained
    Am I correct that it's a standing martingle on him?

    In my opinion, you should NEVER jump with a standing martingale. It needs to be long enough to let the horse stretch out over the jump, and if it's short enough to stop him putting his head up, then it will not allow him to stretch out properly.

    A running martingale is suitable for jumping if necessary, which you have stated it is. The martingale is released with the release of the reins, so it doesn't restrict the horse over the jump, but it comes back into play when the contact is picked up after landing.
         
        03-17-2009, 10:11 PM
      #10
    Started
    You say a martingale is necessary when riding him b/c he bucks and runs off which tells me it's either 1. A training issue or 2. A pain issue. Either/or NO horse NEEDS a standing martingale. I'd seriously reevaluate that....

    As for him being an ex show horse, idc what he was, I know that NOW in that picture his form is incredibly sloppy and the rider is inhibiting his ability to jump, and the martingale is just making matters worse. He's certainly not ready for anything higher than 2', regardless of what he may or may have not done in the past. And if he has a breathing issue that causes him to not be happy when jumping then I STRONGLY suggest that you reconsider if jumping is truly in this horse's best interest...
         

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