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This is a discussion on Flatwork within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category

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        04-02-2013, 08:33 PM
      #11
    Super Moderator
    [QUOTE=Corporal;2105297]You and the horse look pretty good. Your feet are pumping a little bit at the posting trot, so you can work on your leg strength. It just shows some muscle weakness, and I see you have weight in your stirrups. Spend time in a 1/2 seat and riding without stirrups, and especially riding LONG PERIODS without stirrups and your legs will be too tired to push you out of the saddle.
    QUOTE]


    I have a bigtime problem with this; feet pumping, especially my right leg. I never ride without stirrups because I am a wimp and scared to fall off the 17 hh horse.
         
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        04-02-2013, 09:23 PM
      #12
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jaydee    
    I get the feeling that you are trying so hard to 'sit pretty' that you end up being very tense.
    I'm sure if you just relaxed and stopped thinking about what you look like you would find that your seat would naturally deepen and your heels drop down - same with your hands and arms - so much tension there that they end up being a bit rigid
    You have good balance so you're best part there already.
    BTW - I wouldn't dare post a video of me on here and ask for critique so you're really brave!!!
    Yes!! You nailed it. My old instructor would scream at me to sit tall and I felt like I couldn't breathe, or move.. or I'd get yelled at again. I'll try to relax some more.

    Thanks.. yeah brave is one word to describe it. I'm just itching to become a better rider. I will go to any lengths (even embarrasing myself) to get there.

    Thanks all for the encouragement. I feel like I post from my feet less, but it's still an issue so I'm going to try harder to use my muscles.

    :)
         
        04-07-2013, 08:12 PM
      #13
    Showing
    Okay so I had my riding lesson. Basically I felt like a mess at the beginning... and to me it's reflected in my riding.

    However the second half, which I haven't gotten the videos of yet... was much better.

    Do you see improvements? I tried not to move at all during the canter and focused on keeping my legs on the horse, rather than just bouncing around.












    This is only part 1 of the lesson... the other videos are coming. Keep in mind I am new to lateral movements so they probably look like crap lol.
         
        04-07-2013, 11:24 PM
      #14
    Super Moderator
    That's a lot in one lesson. Did you ever feel like the horse gave you a good leg yield?

    I thought it unusual tat the instructor had you leg yield from the wall toward the inside. I always had lessons where we were asked to go down the quarter line and leg yield toward the wall.



    And, I thought it odd that she had you leg yield toward the right, (so horse is bending slightly to left) then have the horse take a right lead canter. I am sure there is a good reason, though.

    you are doing well. I think it's great how steady you kept your hands through the horse's sometimes rough canter/trot/canter, trope transitions, where he was kind of half way inbetween gaits. You handles that well and did not bop his mouth at all.

    I can still see more arch in your back than you need. When you sit down on the saddle at walk, think about this; you know what the human tail bone looks like? It's kind of a "hook" shape, as it curls under. Imagine kind of hooking your tail bone down into the back of the hrose and hook into HIS back bone. That shape you take with your pelvis, try to hold that even when rising with the trot.
    Skyseternalangel likes this.
         
        04-07-2013, 11:47 PM
      #15
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinyliny    
    that's a lot in one lesson. Did you ever feel like the horse gave you a good leg yield?

    I thought it unusual tat the instructor had you leg yield from the wall toward the inside. I always had lessons where we were asked to go down the quarter line and leg yield toward the wall.



    And, I thought it odd that she had you leg yield toward the right, (so horse is bending slightly to left) then have the horse take a right lead canter. I am sure there is a good reason, though.

    you are doing well. I think it's great how steady you kept your hands through the horse's sometimes rough canter/trot/canter, trope transitions, where he was kind of half way inbetween gaits. You handles that well and did not bop his mouth at all.

    I can still see more arch in your back than you need. When you sit down on the saddle at walk, think about this; you know what the human tail bone looks like? It's kind of a "hook" shape, as it curls under. Imagine kind of hooking your tail bone down into the back of the hrose and hook into HIS back bone. That shape you take with your pelvis, try to hold that even when rising with the trot.
    That's not even the hard part of the lesson... lol. I think I may try for a few private lessons again cause my horse is so well trained that he listens to what the instructor is saying, instead of waiting for my cue. And then he just follows the other horses infront so when I TRY to cue properly he just... pops into it. Annoying little bugger :P

    I'm glad my hands are steady lol.. I worked hard on them!

    Okay now your advice for my seat.. I tried to roll my pelvis more underneath me so it's facing forwards instead of down (which I think is a new habit?) but it doesn't look like it made a difference in my back.. so I need to perhaps do some balancing on my ball at home to figure out my positioning...

    I hope the other vids come in so I can see if they are any better. I *felt* more put together but yeah....

    I feel I need to start making him halt and listening to me. Yes my instructor may get mad but he shouldn't just go into robot mode. Not good for me cause I'm struggling to keep up with him...he's infront of my leg, is the term yes?
         
        04-08-2013, 12:15 AM
      #16
    Super Moderator
    Don't be too hard on yourself. I think you are really doing well and I'd put you up on any horse I owned (if I owned one!) because I know you'd take good care of them.
    Corporal and Skyseternalangel like this.
         
        04-08-2013, 06:40 PM
      #17
    Trained
    Steady hands mean steady reins and especially in the canter they are going taught-loose-taught-loose. You can see the expression in the horse that he is not too impressed with being jerked in the mouth every stride. The hands are very rigid and fixed. Not steady.

    Overall your aids are very passive and you are very posed. The first thing I would do were you my student is get your hands down to the withers so you can feel where the motion of the horse is going so that your arms are not so rigid and catching the horse in the mouth every stride. Then I would take away your stirrups to try to get some movement into your seat. Right now again, because you are so rigid and posed, you are stopping the horse with every stride and digging a hole in his back.

    Once everything is not so blocked, then I would start with some leg yields and things, but right now I don't even really see a leg yield, because your other aids are all blocking the horse he can't actually do a leg yield.

    Really think about flopping like a sack of potatoes into the tack and letting the horse move your body. Until you can move with the horse, you will not be able to put an aid on in the correct timing. Your posture is good. This is why I say correct equitation goes way further beyond thumbs up and heels down. Because by a book your equitation is good, but ask the horse or get into a real life riding situation and it falls short.

    Good luck!
    ponypile and Corporal like this.
         
        04-08-2013, 07:07 PM
      #18
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~    
    Steady hands mean steady reins and especially in the canter they are going taught-loose-taught-loose. You can see the expression in the horse that he is not too impressed with being jerked in the mouth every stride. The hands are very rigid and fixed. Not steady.

    Overall your aids are very passive and you are very posed. The first thing I would do were you my student is get your hands down to the withers so you can feel where the motion of the horse is going so that your arms are not so rigid and catching the horse in the mouth every stride. Then I would take away your stirrups to try to get some movement into your seat. Right now again, because you are so rigid and posed, you are stopping the horse with every stride and digging a hole in his back.

    Once everything is not so blocked, then I would start with some leg yields and things, but right now I don't even really see a leg yield, because your other aids are all blocking the horse he can't actually do a leg yield.

    Really think about flopping like a sack of potatoes into the tack and letting the horse move your body. Until you can move with the horse, you will not be able to put an aid on in the correct timing. Your posture is good. This is why I say correct equitation goes way further beyond thumbs up and heels down. Because by a book your equitation is good, but ask the horse or get into a real life riding situation and it falls short.

    Good luck!
    Thank you so much anebel. I agree... I mean people look at me ride and say "oh you have such great balance" yeah... maybe it looks that way but while I'm on the horse I don't feel like that's the case.

    Maybe I'll take a private lesson this weekend and see if I can just... relax some.

    Thanks :)

    As for the canter hands... I usually move them with the horse but my instructor says she doesn't want me doing that since she feels "they don't like it as much as we think" which I found weird.....
         
        04-09-2013, 10:36 AM
      #19
    Super Moderator
    I think you looked better in those videos - but not helped by the fact - as you mention - that the horse is a bit on auto pilot responding more to the instructor and the other horses than it is to you. Maybe some individual lessons would help
    Anebel is right about you being a bit too rigid and I'm sure that's mostly down to still trying too hard to have this perfect position. I like the 'sack of spuds' description - mostly because my one time boss always told me that I 'rode like a sack of spuds tied up horrible' but you know it got results!!!
    Your wonderful efforts at sitting up straight almost push you to get your shoulders too far back, your back too hollowed and then your butt gets left behind and your heels pop up and that is tending to tilt/roll you forwards
    Try to relax, enjoy what your doing, feel the movement of the horse, think sack of spuds or rag doll for a while and feel the difference
    I still give you top marks for courage in showing these videos
    Corporal and Skyseternalangel like this.
         
        04-09-2013, 11:17 AM
      #20
    Trained
    Skyseternalangel, I want to applaud you for your determination. I've been there. I was taking lessons and participating in schooling shows, but I was frustrated bc I knew I couldn't progress much further without my own horse. When I did get my own I was in the best physical shape of my life.
    I think I've indentifed your problem. Your riding muscles aren't strong enough to do what you want them to do. I really like the school horses your are riding. They are calm and patient, but they move out.
    I want to suggest that you buy below:
    Equibarre with Angelea Kelly Walkup: horsebooksetc
    NOTHING and I mean NO exercises or Yoga will get you in better shape without torqueing your body or giving you shin splints, than a dancer's workout. I found this one bc it requires no special equipment to buy. We've ALL been to garage sales with fad workout equipment for sale, hardly used.
    I took ~4 years of ballet, tap and acrobatics, not continguously. I still use a kitchen counter as a "barre."
    Skyseternalangel likes this.
         

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