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Flatwork Critique. Tear me apart.

This is a discussion on Flatwork Critique. Tear me apart. within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        03-09-2011, 07:57 AM
      #11
    Showing
    It's indeed very tiny and I'm somewhat blind... But from what I could see you are not aligned (shoulder/hip/foot): your legs are very forward. Also your arms are straight and move quite a lot on trot (as already suggested bend the elbow and keep them close to the body). Nice horse BTW.
         
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        03-09-2011, 01:22 PM
      #12
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
    While your trot rhythm is steady, the horse is above the bit and showing some tension. This horse would benefit a lot from transitions within the trot to get him to soften and come onto the bit more. Every few strides, half halt, then do a lengthening, half halt, working trot, etc. Really play with the pendulum of the various tempos of trot available to you. He's got some other gears in there. It's just a matter of finding them.

    He has always been above the bit & that's also why I am having a dressage trainer come in to help me with all that. I know it looks like he's tensed but, he was just really stressed out that day. The factory is right next door & he doesn't like when the trucks make noise, also his buddy in the paddock next to him was flipping out so, he was having a rough day.

    His head isn't always that high. He normally puts his head down & lenthaning{sorry, I can't spell today} his strides, he's normally really good. I do a lot of transitions while I am riding him. I just didn't do them in the video because of him being overly stressed out.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mustbemonroe    
    Bend your elbows. Work on flexing your horse more-he looks stiff. It also looks like your lower leg is not underneath you enough and I don't see you posting with your horse-you look like you're trying to get him to move out by posting faster then he is trotting. Getting your leg under you better and using it correctly will help him step out. Being off rhythm and not using his impulsion to help you post could be causing you to come down on his back too hard-which could cause his tension.

    I will most definitely work on bending the elbows more. I flex him before & after we are done working. I normally do circles and stretch his neck but, honestly he really doesn't get it. As for, my lower leg a lot of people say is not underneath me enough and a lot of people say it is.

    Can't people just tell me one thing & stick to it. I am posting with my horse. He has a very fast, working trot and I was rising with his leg so, I know it looks like I'm not posting with him and trying to rush it or going faster than, he's trotting but, I am actually rising with his leg. I am actually more light with my seat than I am hard, definitely not slamming down on his back.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsms    
    Feet are too far forward and leg has too much bend. I'd guess you have too much pressure on the stirrup and not enough weight in your heel. I'd try a longer stirrup and try to let your leg relax. Let gravity pull your leg down.

    Let the horse's movement push you up. Then momentarily and in rhythm with the horse, allow tension in the legs to pause, then slow your return to the saddle. Relax and repeat.

    I was taught posting as a way to avoid sitting the trot, rather than as a refinement of it. I think that was wrong. It led me to riding with constant tension in my legs, making me stiff. My horse then was stiff in response. I'm not an experienced rider and a video of my riding would give howls of laughter or bug-eyed revulsion if posted, so take it for what it is worth. It is something I've started to learn in the last few months. Riding should be a dance, not a wrestling match. When my calf-thigh angle is around 150-160 degrees instead of 130, and when I relax my legs, my heels come back and I can accept the horse's motion and use it to my advantage.

    I have my stirrups short, I think they are on 5 and every time I have a trainer come out they put the hole on 7 or 8 & it bothers the crap out of me so, I definitely know I have to bring my stirrups down. I'm used to having them short.

    As, for letting the horses movement push me up. I do & i'm actually very light with his back so, I don't slam down on his back. I used to have that problem though but, I have fixed it. I normally have people watch me ride whenever there is another person at the barn, and no one has corrected me on it yet & all say I have a light seat.




    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kitten_Val    
    It's indeed very tiny and I'm somewhat blind... But from what I could see you are not aligned (shoulder/hip/foot): your legs are very forward. Also your arms are straight and move quite a lot on trot (as already suggested bend the elbow and keep them close to the body). Nice horse BTW.

    I do move my hands a lot in the trot. I've been trying to work at that but, I am working on fixing that. Thanks.
         
        03-09-2011, 06:27 PM
      #13
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by beauforever23    
    ...I have my stirrups short, I think they are on 5 and every time I have a trainer come out they put the hole on 7 or 8 & it bothers the crap out of me so, I definitely know I have to bring my stirrups down. I'm used to having them short...
    When I made the switch to longer stirrups (4 holes!) about a month ago, it took 3 rides of feeling incredibly awkward before it made sense to my legs. After a month, if feels incredibly bad to shorten them...
         
        03-09-2011, 11:47 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Quote:

    I will most definitely work on bending the elbows more. I flex him before & after we are done working. I normally do circles and stretch his neck but, honestly he really doesn't get it. As for, my lower leg a lot of people say is not underneath me enough and a lot of people say it is.

    Can't people just tell me one thing & stick to it. I am posting with my horse. He has a very fast, working trot and I was rising with his leg so, I know it looks like I'm not posting with him and trying to rush it or going faster than, he's trotting but, I am actually rising with his leg. I am actually more light with my seat than I am hard, definitely not slamming down on his back.

    I just re-watched the video and stick to my former statement of your leg being too far forward-If, when you are in the saddle, you look down and can see your toe, it's too far forward. Your heel should be a straight line from your hip. It is possible you do this defensively since you mentioned he was being stressed out. I would like to see him when he is not in a stressful situation, just for the comparison.

    Hopefully the Dressage trainer can help you with the suppling and maybe have some ideas to help him "get it"...I think serpentines, legs yields, and a little further down the road counter-canter would help you and the horse greatly.
         
        03-10-2011, 12:37 AM
      #15
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mustbemonroe    
    I just re-watched the video and stick to my former statement of your leg being too far forward...
    Agreed.

         
        03-10-2011, 12:48 AM
      #16
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by beauforever23    

    He has always been above the bit & that's also why I am having a dressage trainer come in to help me with all that. I know it looks like he's tensed but, he was just really stressed out that day. The factory is right next door & he doesn't like when the trucks make noise, also his buddy in the paddock next to him was flipping out so, he was having a rough day.


    Your dressage trainer when you get him/her will need to work on a multiple of things. Not just what has been mentioned but everything from the basics up.

    Be prepared to start with the very very basics as I see from this video that the foundation is not there and there are many holes in his and your training.
         

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