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Going to look at her this weekend

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        03-19-2009, 07:01 PM
      #31
    Foal
    Hii
    She looks a nice horse, good luck if you get her :)
    But I would never back a horse until it was at least 4. I wouldn't even think to start a 2 1/2 year old. Sorry just my opinion, but she's still sooo young! Got so much developing and maturing to do, let her be a happy young horse until rising 4 atleast :)
    friendly advice! Xx
         
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        03-19-2009, 07:08 PM
      #32
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BuckOff41570    
    I don't think 2 is too early to start a horse. There is a lot more to breaking a horse than just saddling and riding. The horse will need extensive ground work (which the OP already stated she was planning on doing) She's really cute. Those are tough pictures to critique but she's definitely a cutie. Good luck!
    I agree. 2 isnt too young to start one, although if you don't have any experience starting a horse it may not be the best idea.
         
        03-19-2009, 10:35 PM
      #33
    Banned
    How am I supposed to GET experience if I never try to start one, though?
    It'll be mainly a learning experience. If it proves to much for me and my friend to handle, we'll consult our trainer.
         
        03-20-2009, 12:36 AM
      #34
    Started
    Let us know how it goes ... and what you decide ...

    Like many others have said I too feel that 2 or 2.5 is too young- especially in those pics she still look baby ish- very cute tho!

    I have a 3 yr old OTTB who I don't plan to back for a while- yes she has already has been ridden but I want to do it all from the ground up, my way- I have a 5 yr old OTTB who I did the same things with and when you take it slow it produces a MUCH better/solid horse for a lifetime ..

    Best of Luck!

    P.S. There are a lot of free horses out there right now ..
         
        03-20-2009, 01:00 AM
      #35
    Cat
    Green Broke
    I started serious ground-work with my solid paint when he was 2. This included voice commands from the ground, hand walking on the trails, desensitizing, getting used to a saddle, etc. The first time I got in the saddle he was 2.5 years. We did some light riding - Very basic of getting used to someone on his back and getting balance at a walk and some light trotting. A couple very easy trails and to get the start of a GOOD whoa on him. He then had the rest of the fall & winter off and then his real training started more serious training as a 3 year old. Even at 3 we only lightly cantered so he had an idea of what it was and wouldn't freak if he went up into that gait. Real canter work doesn't happen until 4 & 5 years of age for my horses.

    For my haflinger I did wait until he was a full 3 before he was backed - but his trainer did not feel he was mentally ready for it as a late 2 year old.

    I prefer the method of starting slowly like this. I feel there is a HUGE difference between starting like this and others who start 2 year olds and work them through W/T/C and spins, tight circles, hard terrain, and other strenous activities. This way their body can adjust to weight carrying but its done at a very easy pace.
         
        03-21-2009, 04:48 PM
      #36
    Banned
    Thanks, I'm sure I wont get to do anything serious anyway, this summer at least. Then I get real busy once school starts.
         
        03-24-2009, 02:04 PM
      #37
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by girl_on_black_pony    
    How am I supposed to GET experience if I never try to start one, though?
    It'll be mainly a learning experience. If it proves to much for me and my friend to handle, we'll consult our trainer.

    That is my thinking as well. You sound like you are experienced enough to start this project and it appears that you have thought it through. You have access to a professional and have your own barn/pasture. I think as long as she is sound both mentally and physically then I'd go for it.

    I also think that you should be careful taking advice from forums. Not that there aren't knowledgeable people on here, but it is very easy for people to bark orders and opinions on a forum and not practice what they preach.

    It all boils down to experience and confidence. You get experience by doing it and get confidence by doing it well.
         
        03-24-2009, 03:58 PM
      #38
    mls
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Twitch2008    
    it is very easy for people to bark orders and opinions on a forum and not practice what they preach.
    Interesting comment.

    We start our horses under saddle the summer they turn two. We have quarter horses - eligible for futurity purses. I put about 15-20 rides (walk/trot) on my husbands 2 year old last summer. Few nice walking trail rides. Then she was turned out for the winter. We just started her again two weeks ago.

    Three rides on her by my husband. She very willingly walks, trots and lopes under saddle. No balks, no bucks, no rears. The third ride she was tracking cattle.

    Tracking was 100% her idea. Cattle were cooling off after we had worked them and the intent was just to work the filly in the arena NEAR them to see her reaction.
         
        03-24-2009, 05:01 PM
      #39
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by girl_on_black_pony    
    How am I supposed to GET experience if I never try to start one, though?
    It'll be mainly a learning experience. If it proves to much for me and my friend to handle, we'll consult our trainer.
    This is not to say that I mean this for you but to answer your question, that is what an apprenticeship is for. To start a horse poorly and not realize it, only makes it difficult for the horse that got screwed up. Unfortunately, by the time many people figure out that they are over their heads, they have a problem horse on their hands. It's simple to see - look how many problem horses there are.
         
        03-24-2009, 06:00 PM
      #40
    Banned
    Yes, I see. Twitch made a good point though, I'm taking advice from everyone one here, but in my mind, filtering through what information I conclude to be logical. Not that you all are illogical, just that beliefs/techniques are different.

    I respect what you all have said, but at the same time, I have to be wary of what information I choose to follow, remembering that you all do not know me or my situation.

    All advice has been taken in and considered, and I thank you all for that. I know now to be careful of what the horse's mental/physical condition is before deciding when to train or even to buy said horse. I suppose you'd have to know the horse better, also to make the most accurate statement.

    IRH, I understand your concern about the horse, I myself know a few that have been started and their trainers realize, when it's too late, that the horse is screwed up. Hopefully with my plan/CA program and trainer, I can prevent the horse from becoming just another sale number.
         

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