Golly, what do ya think!
   

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Golly, what do ya think!

This is a discussion on Golly, what do ya think! within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        10-17-2007, 09:48 PM
      #1
    Foal
    Golly, what do ya think!

    Ain't he cute? Let me know what ya'll think


         
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        10-17-2007, 11:38 PM
      #2
    Yearling
    He's nice but your stirrups are a tad short
         
        10-18-2007, 07:11 AM
      #3
    Weanling
    As said as above your stirrups could come down a hole or two.

    You really need to sit up and and sit on your bum if you where to sit up in that picture you would have a 'chair' position, When you drop your stirrups down a couple of holes it will make it easyer for you to bring your leg back and drop your heal down from your shoulders.

    You horse -
    Isn't using his hide quarters at all (to me) in that picture so he is incorrectly bent (faluse bend) it also looks like he is avading contact.
    - Once you get the horse on the bit, you release. This does not mean giving the rein away or dropping the contact – if anything, that would be a punishment. Release means returning to a quiet, neutral position while still maintaining contact with the bit. It might be one stride or twenty before you have to make the next correction, but timing is crucial: as soon as you get an inkling that you're losing it, send them forward and correct with the rein.

    Overall you look good keep up the good work.
         
        10-18-2007, 09:52 AM
      #4
    Started
    Wow, your saddle looks WAY forward. Like a good 5 or 6 inches too forward...the line of his shoulder goes right under the saddle O_o

    He's a very handsome horse.
         
        10-18-2007, 12:52 PM
      #5
    Foal
    As the others said:
    - saddle too far forward, its interfering with his shoulder
    - stirrups too short (unless you are about to do some major high jumping and need the extra knee room, but even then, a tad short), and it looks like you are slipping out of the iron
    - his head/neck is funny, but by the curve of the reins looks like maybe he was going after a fly? Or just bending his head that way for fun?
    - you are leaning forward, but it looks to me (from the horse's leg position) that maybe he was being pokey and needed some extra encouragement? Lowering your stirrups will place your leg in a better position to communicate with the horse and will take less effort to go and you can relax and sit up straight.

    'nuf negatives! He is has a very elegant/graceful build without looking skinny, and his coat is very shiny and healthy (dapples=happy horse ) his ears look relaxed and attentive, like he trusts you and is enjoying the ride. :)
         
        10-19-2007, 04:34 PM
      #6
    Foal
    Looks like the kind of guy you would see going over the Chair.
         
        10-22-2007, 04:39 PM
      #7
    Foal
    Stirrups are waaayyyy too short. That length serves one purpose: Grand Prix Jumping......not flat work. Bring them down AT LEAST two holes. Saddle should not be ON HIS SHOULDERS!! You need to put your saddle back...on his back......at least two inches back. His hind end is being very lazy. He needs to bring it up under him and use it. You are also bending him incorrectly. HIs head is only pulled in. You need to lower it, then bring it in. He should have a curve in his headset, it looks like he's just avoiding the bit right now. You need to sit back, and stop looking at your horse. Staring at his headset isn't going to make his headset better.

    I think I've said enough bad things, on to the good. Your leg is nicely positioned, good heels. It will look alot better once the saddle goes back. He looks like a gorgeous mover, and will be even better once you work on his hind end. And he shines! Must be well taken care of!!
         
        10-26-2007, 01:40 AM
      #8
    Foal
    I agree with your stirrups being a bit short. If this is the length you feel comfortable riding at, this may be indicitive of a leg that needs to do no-stirrup work, which will put your leg in a more natural position, stretching it right down into a more appropriate length. Your leg looks great as short as it is here, so it should drop down into a perfect position. This will also make it easier for you to sit up straight with your shoulders back, as will keeping your eyes up.

    As for your hands, I may be completely due to the small size of the photo, but it looks like your riding with your palms down. If this is the case, turn those thumbs up! This position allows you to use your wrists effectively, and in turn your reins effectively.

    My only other critique on your position is to look up and loosen up those elbows. They're in a very nice spot along your body, but they need some flexibility to interact peacefully with your horses mouth.

    Your horse isn't being worked into a frame properly, it looks like this has been happening for awhile, and my guess is you're not the one that originally trained him into this. He's behind the bit, his hind end isn't engaged, and he is stiff, especially through his shoulder and front end. If you want to become a more effective rider, which you look more than capable of doing, you must remember that just because a horse looks round, doesn't mean he is working well or even comfortably. Sit for a few moments with your shoulders scrunched up into your ears and your chin tucked into your neck. It's incredibly uncomfortable. Now imagine that you had to exercise in this position. This is essentially what you're asking your horse to do in this photo. For a horse to be productively round, he must first be able to move around the ring relaxed. He must walk relaxed before he trots, must trot relaxed before he canters, etc. When you have a happy, relaxed horse, that's when you ask him to move forward. When you have a happy, relaxed horse that's moving forward, that's when you ask him to bend. Gently nose in, gently nose out, etc. When you have a happily bending horse, that's when you ask him to really engage his hind end. It's at this point, and this point only that you can begin to ask him for round movement. Now, he may out of habit suck back behind the bit at any point during this process, but this shouldn't be encouraged. He should be ridden forward with a relaxed hand, seat and leg out of this position if this happens. This process doesn't have to be completed all in one ride, and probably shouldn't. This looks like a horse that's accostomed to being ridden all bunched up, and it may take a week of just walk and trot to even begin to relax him. But that's okay! It's a common misconception that a horse is working well if he looks round. But in the end you'll have a happier horse who moves a million times better and who will stay sound longer. I mean, just imagine how badly you'd hurt yourself if you had to workout every day in the position I described earlier.

    I hope I've been of some help, I'm new to this board and I don't know how much criticism is too much :roll: ! Let me know if I went overboard, I was just excited about what I saw in this photo.
         
        10-26-2007, 06:50 AM
      #9
    Foal
    I see most people pointed out that your stirrups are too short so Im not going to bother with that :)

    As with your horses neck, you can tell he looks a tad un comfortable. Try lengthening your reins a bit and give him more space. He could be like my horse and just needs rein room to perform. Im not sure whether or not he's after a fly or anything but generally speaking his head (from poll to nose) should make an upside down "T" shape with the ground.
    Also if he is green, don't try too hard with making him look very round. Allow him rein room but keep him neck on a slight arch. Once he builds up the correct muscles you can move on...:)
         
        10-26-2007, 07:10 AM
      #10
    Showing
    :) Yes, he is cute :)
         

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