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Harley and I jumping!

This is a discussion on Harley and I jumping! within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category
  • "half seat" riding diagram

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    12-10-2012, 07:56 PM
  #11
Started
I agree with Oxer, impulsion is nice when leading up to a jump. While it's pleasant to see him not rushing, he really ought to be into it too.
I think what Klassic was trying to say (it looks like she has a tough auto-correct) was that you should work on loosening up your upper body and reaching more forward into the jump.
So you can start your rides by stretching your arms, stretch them out to either side (like and airplane) make circles with your arms. Roll your shoulders in circles backwards to help open up your diaphragm and relax your upper body.
Then when you jump and go into your half seat you want to stretch your arms up a little less than half way up the horse's neck and stand well up out of the saddle. You should practice this regularly at the trot and canter to work on your balance before jumping like this. This will help your seat a great deal because it will help align your lower leg and keep your balance. You should be able to comfortably reach up and rest your hands on the horse's neck, standing up off the horse's back without actually resting weight on the horse's neck - this is tougher than it sounds ;)
I think that will help a great deal to allow the horse a little more room to jump.
While I love that your hands are so still and quiet, but they should be a bit more forward in general, and much more forward over the jump :)

So work on loosening up your upper half, stretching up into a full half seat when jumping and standing up well off the horse's back during the jump.
This diagram isn't perfect, but you can get the idea, when actually jumping I'd like to see the person even more forward than this:
     
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    12-10-2012, 08:11 PM
  #12
Showing
The first thing I noticed is that you're using your reins for balance - can you go in a two point while in a walk, trot AND canter (and transitions between said gaits) without using the reins or neck for balance? I would be willing to bet $10 that you can't at the moment, which is causing some major balance issues.
Your horse can compensate by being a saint and just heaving himself over small jumps, but if you truly want to jump, you have to start with the basics.
At a walk, get up in the two point making sure that your weight is in your heels. Don't let your hands rest on your horse's neck, just maintain light contact. Stay up in the two point without falling forwards or backwards. Once you can do that for a few laps around the arena (consistently!!!!) then start by holding one arm out to the side, then the other arm. Remember, no butt-slapping or stabilizing on the neck! Once you have that mastered, move to the trot... then work on your walk/trot transitions... then move to the canter. Rinse, repeat. Then add in a few trot or canter poles.
You do not have any sort of jumping balance right now - which is OK!! 6 months ago I didn't have any to speak of either.. I'm just getting back into jumping, myself. My ankles still hurt after a good ride, and my legs burn, but I know that I'm way ahead of where I was even two months ago. You can really see the lack of stability in your jumping position upon landing - your leg swings and pops you back out of the saddle.
Your horse looks like a cute boy, and very forgiving. Give yourself the time to develop a good solid base so neither of you rush where you aren't ready to go just yet.
You need to shorten up your rein a good 6" and bring your hands up and forwards; you want a straight line from elbow to bit.
Are you working with a coach??
     
    12-10-2012, 08:22 PM
  #13
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
The first thing I noticed is that you're using your reins for balance - can you go in a two point while in a walk, trot AND canter (and transitions between said gaits) without using the reins or neck for balance? I would be willing to bet $10 that you can't at the moment, which is causing some major balance issues.
Your horse can compensate by being a saint and just heaving himself over small jumps, but if you truly want to jump, you have to start with the basics.
At a walk, get up in the two point making sure that your weight is in your heels. Don't let your hands rest on your horse's neck, just maintain light contact. Stay up in the two point without falling forwards or backwards. Once you can do that for a few laps around the arena (consistently!!!!) then start by holding one arm out to the side, then the other arm. Remember, no butt-slapping or stabilizing on the neck! Once you have that mastered, move to the trot... then work on your walk/trot transitions... then move to the canter. Rinse, repeat. Then add in a few trot or canter poles.
You do not have any sort of jumping balance right now - which is OK!! 6 months ago I didn't have any to speak of either.. I'm just getting back into jumping, myself. My ankles still hurt after a good ride, and my legs burn, but I know that I'm way ahead of where I was even two months ago. You can really see the lack of stability in your jumping position upon landing - your leg swings and pops you back out of the saddle.
Your horse looks like a cute boy, and very forgiving. Give yourself the time to develop a good solid base so neither of you rush where you aren't ready to go just yet.
You need to shorten up your rein a good 6" and bring your hands up and forwards; you want a straight line from elbow to bit.
Are you working with a coach??
Nope :) just for fun! I don't want to be great at it, just to be able to say I can and survive. You see, when I let my horse go to a retirement home, I lost all my nerve for jumping. It has taken a long time for Harley and I to get to this point. Before Harley came this spring, I hadn't jumped in about 2 yrs and have never had any jumping lessons at all. I was just curious to see how my jumping was after having straight dressage and never having a jumping lesson and barely jumping at all
     
    12-10-2012, 08:23 PM
  #14
Yearling
Amen to Dressage
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    12-10-2012, 08:24 PM
  #15
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horseychick94    
Nope :) just for fun! I don't want to be great at it, just to be able to say I can and survive. You see, when I let my horse go to a retirement home, I lost all my nerve for jumping. It has taken a long time for Harley and I to get to this point. Before Harley came this spring, I hadn't jumped in about 2 yrs and have never had any jumping lessons at all. I was just curious to see how my jumping was after having straight dressage and never having a jumping lesson and barely jumping at all
Look... Im going to be honest here... If you're just out to do it for "fun" with absolutely no training, stop it.
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    12-10-2012, 08:28 PM
  #16
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horseychick94    
Nope :) just for fun! I don't want to be great at it, just to be able to say I can and survive. You see, when I let my horse go to a retirement home, I lost all my nerve for jumping. It has taken a long time for Harley and I to get to this point. Before Harley came this spring, I hadn't jumped in about 2 yrs and have never had any jumping lessons at all. I was just curious to see how my jumping was after having straight dressage and never having a jumping lesson and barely jumping at all

I think it's fantastic you're opening up :) Jumping can be fun. But even if it is just for fun, you really want to be sure you're doing it the right way. The 'rules' we make for how to jump 'properly' aren't just for show or to look pretty, but to enable the horse to move more comfortably and correctly. We, as riders, want to interfere with the horse's movement as little as possible, allowing them to move comfortably the way we ask them.
The more comfortable they are doing what we ask, the more likely they'll want to do what we ask. :)

I would recommend following Dressage's advice pretty solid, especially developing a good solid half seat - that will also help correct all your little issues with balance and leg position too. :)
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    12-10-2012, 08:30 PM
  #17
Showing
Sorry, HorseyChick94 - if you want to jump, you have to invest the time in learning how to do it correctly, not just "do it and survive." There's a LOT more that can go wrong with jumping than "just" riding around. Please please be safe - either take it seriously and learn how to do it properly, or maybe just not jumping isn't a bad idea. The way you're jumping now isn't correct and can end badly with either your horse becoming sore to the idea, or either one of you getting hurt.
What are you jumping in that video, by the way?
PunksTank likes this.
     
    12-10-2012, 08:30 PM
  #18
Showing
PurpsTank said it wonderfully, and much more eloquently than I.
     
    12-10-2012, 08:32 PM
  #19
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horseychick94    
Nope :) just for fun! I don't want to be great at it, just to be able to say I can and survive. You see, when I let my horse go to a retirement home, I lost all my nerve for jumping. It has taken a long time for Harley and I to get to this point. Before Harley came this spring, I hadn't jumped in about 2 yrs and have never had any jumping lessons at all. I was just curious to see how my jumping was after having straight dressage and never having a jumping lesson and barely jumping at all
But what about the horse - the input that you have been given isn't so much about your benefit, but about making this whole thing as easy as possible on the horse.
PunksTank likes this.
     
    12-10-2012, 08:39 PM
  #20
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
Sorry, HorseyChick94 - if you want to jump, you have to invest the time in learning how to do it correctly, not just "do it and survive." There's a LOT more that can go wrong with jumping than "just" riding around. Please please be safe - either take it seriously and learn how to do it properly, or maybe just not jumping isn't a bad idea. The way you're jumping now isn't correct and can end badly with either your horse becoming sore to the idea, or either one of you getting hurt.
What are you jumping in that video, by the way?
Yeah I am going to take some time to improve my jumping but im not looking to be "the best" out there. A lot of enjoyment is taken out of riding when people try to be perfect. Now I highly doubt that popping a horse over a low jump once in a blue moon is going to be detrimental. I've seen way worse. I live out in the country so trust me, I have seen some crap that will make you cringe. This is nothing. These are the first jumps I have done in years just to get my confidence back. Nothing more, nothing less. Am I any good? Probably not. But im definitely not hurting my horse. BUT I will start investing my time into getting better just so I don't suck completely. Maybe I might even do a few shows but there are a lot of snobs out there that I don't want anything to do with. I am jumping bales of shavings in the video.
     

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beginner, fun, harley, jumping, training

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