How do youn know from pictures that the horse is working from behind??
 
 

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How do youn know from pictures that the horse is working from behind??

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    12-17-2012, 03:28 PM
  #1
Weanling
How do youn know from pictures that the horse is working from behind??

Q: How to you know from pictures if the horse is working from behind?

Some say that the in trot, the hind leg cannot be in air when the diagonal front one is on the ground. Some say that the upper bone on the front leg must be ˙arallel with the lower bone of the hind leg (in trot). In canter the horse must look like he is going upwards...

Can you tell something for example about this photographs?











     
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    12-17-2012, 04:08 PM
  #2
Weanling
I have no idea. So im going to sub and see what everyone else has to say!
     
    12-17-2012, 04:13 PM
  #3
Green Broke
When a horse is working from behind or having impulsion you will see that the hind leg will have the same movement as the front leg (such as same hight and will reach under the belly to almost the front leg) but will land a little bit before the front leg.

You will see the pelvic bone tip, almost like tucking the tail. The belly muscles will contract and raise the back and spine, getting a rounded spine.
You can also see the end of the thoracic and the lumbar vertabrea (the area just behind where the saddle sits on the horse) will be straight or curved upwards.
nvr2many likes this.
     
    12-19-2012, 08:32 PM
  #4
Trained
The first thing I look at is the area behind the saddle. If there is a dip there, the horse is not using his back and is therefore not through. In this case, there is no dip, so this horse is using his back. This horse is trotting, so it is easy to confirm that the distance between the hind legs and forelegs match. Also an indicator that the horse is tracking up. Lastly is the neck. In this horse, the bulge in the neck is in the correct spot and distributed down the entire neck. This suggests a horse being ridden correctly and not held together by heavy hands. Had the bulge been more concentrated further down the neck, or worse, on the underside of the neck, that would show a horse being ridden front to back. That's what I look for.
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Hailey1203 and nvr2many like this.
     
    12-20-2012, 05:40 AM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
The first thing I look at is the area behind the saddle. If there is a dip there, the horse is not using his back and is therefore not through. In this case, there is no dip, so this horse is using his back. This horse is trotting, so it is easy to confirm that the distance between the hind legs and forelegs match. Also an indicator that the horse is tracking up. Lastly is the neck. In this horse, the bulge in the neck is in the correct spot and distributed down the entire neck. This suggests a horse being ridden correctly and not held together by heavy hands. Had the bulge been more concentrated further down the neck, or worse, on the underside of the neck, that would show a horse being ridden front to back. That's what I look for.
Thanks! That's what I was looking for :)
     
    12-20-2012, 09:04 AM
  #6
Yearling
Nothing to do with the original post, sorry its off topic. But what is the little hat thing the horse's ears are going? Looks like a little horse beany.
     
    12-20-2012, 09:15 AM
  #7
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnrewPL    
Nothing to do with the original post, sorry its off topic. But what is the little hat thing the horse's ears are going? Looks like a little horse beany.
Well if you mean the ear cover for horses, it is a accessory, covers ears so flies cannot bother the horse, and it looks nice We call in čabraka here in czech, but I do not know the name in english
     
    12-20-2012, 03:48 PM
  #8
Yearling
In english we call them ear nets or fly bonnets!
     
    12-20-2012, 05:39 PM
  #9
Green Broke
Shahoona, you posted pictures of well trained horses. I am going to post a picture of my then young green 2 year old that tended to pull herself around and not use her rear. Look at the distance of her front legs compared to the back legs. Look how extended her front leg is before it comes off the ground. The picture where she is more balanced and even is after working her a bit.

It mlesson 05 21 10 155.jpg

Copy of lesson 05 21 10 069.jpg
     
    12-20-2012, 06:49 PM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by churumbeque    
Shahoona, you posted pictures of well trained horses. I am going to post a picture of my then young green 2 year old that tended to pull herself around and not use her rear. Look at the distance of her front legs compared to the back legs. Look how extended her front leg is before it comes off the ground. The picture where she is more balanced and even is after working her a bit.

It mAttachment 122481

Attachment 122482
This is amazing, great post here :) Thanks very very much :)
     

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