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How's My EQ? And My Horse?

This is a discussion on How's My EQ? And My Horse? within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category

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        08-02-2013, 01:00 AM
      #11
    Showing
    The first thing I notice is your horse isn't tracking up, which makes me immediately go to your low hands and her nose tucked in and think that the goal was "head down" instead of roundness. Pick up your hands, bend your elbows and get some impulse on going. Make that horse use its hind end. By the stride size, she looks equally restricted front and hind.
    You're perching a bit in the saddle, instead if sitting in an effective seat. Roll your shoulders up and back, open up your chest. Stirrupless work may be your newfound best friend. Close your fingers, thumbs up, wrists straight.
    You two make a lovely pair, but you need to get your horse engaged and forget about being pretty.
    There are a million threads around here regarding roundness vs "headset" (ugh) and you may want to look up suppling exercises too - get reading :)
         
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        08-02-2013, 06:57 PM
      #12
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinyliny    
    Looks good, but you can bring your hands up.
    Is that photo photoshopped? Like your horse has a halo around his body.
    Yea it is! The original wouldn't upload because it was too big!
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        08-02-2013, 06:59 PM
      #13
    Foal
    =JustDressageIt;3233833]The first thing I notice is your horse isn't tracking up, which makes me immediately go to your low hands and her nose tucked in and think that the goal was "head down" instead of roundness. Pick up your hands, bend your elbows and get some impulse on going. Make that horse use its hind end. By the stride size, she looks equally restricted front and hind.
    You're perching a bit in the saddle, instead if sitting in an effective seat. Roll your shoulders up and back, open up your chest. Stirrupless work may be your newfound best friend. Close your fingers, thumbs up, wrists straight.
    You two make a lovely pair, but you need to get your horse engaged and forget about being pretty.
    There are a million threads around here regarding roundness vs "headset" (ugh) and you may want to look up suppling exercises too - get reading :)[/QUOTE]

    Thank you so mich for such a thourogh crituqe! I will dedinatly work on all of that! Thanks again!
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        08-02-2013, 07:02 PM
      #14
    Showing
    You're very welcome!!! Please post update photos when you can. Your horse is lovely and you make a very nice pair :)
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        08-02-2013, 07:06 PM
      #15
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
    You're very welcome!!! Please post update photos when you can. Your horse is lovely and you make a very nice pair :)
    Posted via Mobile Device

    Thanks so much! And I will!
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        08-04-2013, 03:21 AM
      #16
    Super Moderator
    I agree with Dressage It. My fist and last opinion is 'stiffness' in you.
    Your arms are rigid, your back is hollow, heels jammed down so far it causes stiffness right up through your body.

    You need to relax more into the horse. Lots or sitting trot without stirrups, one hand on the reins the other pulling the saddle off the horses withers so you are sitting deep. Feel the difference when you stop pulling yourself down into the saddle and work to achieve this without the pulling.
    Another exercise is to sit, deep, lean back and raise both legs away from the saddle so your knees and thigh are away from the saddle, knees level with the pommel, do this for four or five strides and then down for ten then up again. It is a hard exercise to do, makes you lean back but sits you deep on your seat. Feel how you are sitting and try to keep that feel when sitting up.
    As said, you have worked to get a head set rather than a forward active trot, allow the horse to go long and low, more active with her hind legs. Once she is using herself the head will be in the correct place and you will be able to carry your hands rather than keeping them fixed to keep her head in the right place.

    She looks a nice stamp of horse.
         
        08-22-2013, 03:59 AM
      #17
    Banned
    I know why your hands are down a bit. Since you're working on the flat, you're trying to bring the horse's head down a bit, I can see that! Just make sure your hands don't stay that way throughout. Thumbs on top, roll your shoulders back, straighten your spine a bit... And sit two beats to change to the right diagonal;)
         
        08-22-2013, 12:31 PM
      #18
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ponyhorse1516    
    I know why your hands are down a bit. Since you're working on the flat, you're trying to bring the horse's head down a bit, I can see that! Just make sure your hands don't stay that way throughout. Thumbs on top, roll your shoulders back, straighten your spine a bit... And sit two beats to change to the right diagonal;)
    Nope. You don't want your hands down to bring the head down. You want your hands correct from the get go.
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        08-22-2013, 01:13 PM
      #19
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JustDressageIt    
    Nope. You don't want your hands down to bring the head down. You want your hands correct from the get go.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    This ^

    Because this is what happens when you have your hands low to get the head down, and this is not correct at all [my horse, not me riding]:

    Note the trailing back end and severe difference in stride length between front and hind. It would get horrible marks in pretty much any discipline.

    I have a really bad habit of having low hands by default, it's just what my body is determined to do, so while my horse is working better in the next photo, the rider doesn't look much different if at all, and yes I swear it's the same horse.

    Not that that's so easy to believe when you compare how she's working between the two shots! Still behind the vertical here but if you look at her overall body, she's working much better. Her balance is nice and uphill - though you'll notice there is STILL some disparity between stride length in front and behind.

    My horse is 3, she isn't the best horse in the world to use as an example because she's so young and so green, but you can see that there's a BIG difference in how she goes between my friend and I.

    What you have with your horse right now is what is called 'false frame' by most equestrians in my area. It's going to be super hard to fix that. Once a horse learns to tuck its nose in and work behind the bit like that, it's very difficult to get it properly on the bit. But, and this is key, it CAN be fixed.

    EDIT; and I thought I'd attach a pic as well. The photo that's attached here is probably the best my girl has ever worked. We get bigger flashier and more correct movement with a longer, flatter frame, but she then works downhill. Second photo attached shows that.

    She's a baby... yeah. Definitely not an example of what you want to aspire to, but better than what you've got now.
    Attached Images
    File Type: jpg magic dressage horse trot 2 - Edited.jpg (62.5 KB, 27 views)
    File Type: jpg magic hack trot 2.jpg (58.0 KB, 27 views)
    Skyseternalangel likes this.
         

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