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Hunter O/F critique

This is a discussion on Hunter O/F critique within the Horse Riding Critique forums, part of the Riding Horses category

     
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        01-20-2011, 02:02 PM
      #21
    Weanling
    Do you have access to any trainers with a dressage background? Some really basic dressage lessons might be beneficial at this stage of her training. Learning to use her hind end for power, rhythm, relaxation, lengthing & collecting, balance... Just a thought! I have a dressage trainer hop on my guy once a week, to get him more supple and forward.
         
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        01-20-2011, 02:08 PM
      #22
    Banned
    I agree with Zimpatico. Dressage lessons would be perfect.
         
        01-20-2011, 02:15 PM
      #23
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Zimpatico    
    Do you have access to any trainers with a dressage background? Some really basic dressage lessons might be beneficial at this stage of her training. Learning to use her hind end for power, rhythm, relaxation, lengthing & collecting, balance... Just a thought! I have a dressage trainer hop on my guy once a week, to get him more supple and forward.

    Unfortunately no, and I've only took one dressage lesson in my whole life and that was about 10 years ago.

    So I've been kind of reading and teaching myself how to get her to use her back end...what I've been doing is a lot of trot canter transitions...and I've been cantering her in smaller circles, so she' doesn't really get a chance to open up too much. I guess it's been working, she used to trot in the back and canter in the front, and switch her back lead every 3 strides. But I do feel like it's taking forever. I know it doesnt happen over night though.
         
        01-20-2011, 02:18 PM
      #24
    Banned
    Doing trot canter transitions and such will only work if you are doing them right. And I am not saying you are not doing them right, I am just saying that it is just as easy for the horse to run through the transition as do anything else if that is what it is inclined to do.
         
        01-20-2011, 02:22 PM
      #25
    Weanling
    My trainer has me to an exercise that helps get Zee in front of my leg, but it might work to sharpen your horse to wait and listen as well. We do a LOT of canter/trot transitions. 5 strides canter, 7 strides trot. It forces them to use their hind end for the upward and downward transitions, and they have to become very sharp to your aids. Someone else mentioned grid work and gymnastics, which is also very helpful. Another exercise we do occassionally is set up four ground poles in a fan shape. Striped poles work best. The inner stripe is spaced for collected trot, the middle stripe is spaced for working trot, and the outer stripe is spaced for lengthened trot. We work on a circle starting with working trot, then introduce the other spots on the poles. By the end of the exercise, I'm able to take him in a one position, and leg yield into another stripe (enter at working trot, and move him over into a collected or lengthened trot). My trainer can get creative!
         
        01-20-2011, 02:22 PM
      #26
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Alwaysbehind    
    Doing trot canter transitions and such will only work if you are doing them right. And I am not saying you are not doing them right, I am just saying that it is just as easy for the horse to run through the transition as do anything else if that is what it is inclined to do.

    I don't know if I'm doing them right neither. What I'll do is get a nice sitting trot going, and make sure she isn't pulling me down on the forehand, and I'll do some circles at the trot. Then in the middle of a circle I keep my same position, and pick up a canter, then canter around in a circle for a few strides. Then bring her back down to a sitting trot, then do it all over again.
         
        01-20-2011, 02:25 PM
      #27
    Weanling
    There is also the one where you take four ground poles on at least a 20 meter circle, and place one pole at 12:00, 3:00, 6:00, 9:00. Ride the circle at the canter and it should help you find your rhythm between poles. If her stride is not in rhythm, you'll chip or take a long stride on the canter poles.
         
        01-20-2011, 02:27 PM
      #28
    Green Broke
    I know there have been a fair amount of comments on this, but just going to add what worthy my two cents will be.

    First video: I know you commented that she was rushing towards the fence somewhere ^^ up there, but you had an opportunity to make a circle before coming to the first fence. You should have organized yourself a bit more before coming to the fence. After the first jump you zagged pretty hard. Hunters is about pretty and smooth. You would have been better to leg yeild her over to the wall, or more towards the track. You had plenty of room to have a good approach to the second jump. (If you open up your inside rein just a bit when going over a fence and "look" in the direction that you are wanting to go, you are more likely to get your lead.) The diagonal line looked a lot straighter then the first outside line (jumps 2/3). Coming into the last fence you were not very straight. I would finish a round with at least 1/2 to 3/4 of a circle at a canter, on the correct lead....even if it meant doing a simple change. During the course, I would do the same...simple change to get the leads, especially if you guys are just starting to show as a team.

    Second video: Not straight to the first fence. The approach to the second fence looks funny.....it isn't very smooth. It looks like you turned at the very top of the arena too soon, then realized your mistake. Go deeper into your corners and use the whole arena. When you go deep into the corners, you will have more time to slow down and get your canter back, which is what you need to do with a rusher. The white line was much better the second time you rode it, and I am going to assume that you guys are still getting used to striding. However, you should have slightly pushed/collected for that to make the striding fit.... She got 4.5 strides, and could have easily gotten the 4 with a bit of push, or a nice 5 with a bit of collection. It doesnt take much either way to make it the right striding. You totally dropped her in front of the fence that she stopped at about a stride out. You stopped riding to it, which was your fault. Then you came into it with her looking at it with what looks like to be no extra leg the second time. It was a smooth line though, and I really liked it. If you hadn't trotted in though, I think you would have had a hard time with the striding again.

    She looks like she will be a really good hunter mare given some more experience. Work a bit more on your striding....set a line up that you know is for a quiet 5 strides, and then do 5 strides....but also collect for 6/7 or push for a more flowing 4.

    You said your mare rushes, correct? Then set her up in the first corner and have her come back to you. It is the best way to have organization when you go to your next fence.
         
        01-20-2011, 02:28 PM
      #29
    Weanling
    Erika, where are you located? Are you at a boarding barn with a trainer? I know of a few good dressage instructors that work with hunters & jumpers, but I don't know if your situation would allow an outside trainer.
         
        01-20-2011, 02:32 PM
      #30
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Zimpatico    
    My trainer has me to an exercise that helps get Zee in front of my leg, but it might work to sharpen your horse to wait and listen as well. We do a LOT of canter/trot transitions. 5 strides canter, 7 strides trot. It forces them to use their hind end for the upward and downward transitions, and they have to become very sharp to your aids. Someone else mentioned grid work and gymnastics, which is also very helpful. Another exercise we do occassionally is set up four ground poles in a fan shape. Striped poles work best. The inner stripe is spaced for collected trot, the middle stripe is spaced for working trot, and the outer stripe is spaced for lengthened trot. We work on a circle starting with working trot, then introduce the other spots on the poles. By the end of the exercise, I'm able to take him in a one position, and leg yield into another stripe (enter at working trot, and move him over into a collected or lengthened trot). My trainer can get creative!

    I actually do a lot of gymnastics. Usually about 8 bounces in then a 1 stride. Then we did the fan shaped ground poles to cavalettis to two bounces to two 1 strides. She is actually very good at gymnastics...and she works off your leg really well also, but only at the trot and walk.

    Our biggest problem is cantering..I feel like everything else has clicked with us, except for cantering. I feel like once I pick up a canter we get all disorganized.
         

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