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Id love some general criticism on me riding

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        06-07-2013, 12:24 PM
      #11
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Four Seasons    
    No, no slack in the reins at all! You must keep contact with the horses mouth. But you are getting pulled into the movement, which is incorrect. You are being forced to move, this has to change. You have to have control over your arms and upper body. If you put your hands just infront of the saddle (which is where they should be at all times) you will get the correct length of reins and won't be pulled around.

    Thank you so much for your advice,ill give it a try when im riding next week
         
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        06-07-2013, 12:29 PM
      #12
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinyliny    
    you are doing quite well for the limited amount of time you've been able to have in the saddle.

    I notice that your toe point outward too much , especially with the right foot, and you may be gripping upward with your calf.

    I would suggest working on the lunge line at canter, drop the reins, really relax and allow all your weight to be in the saddle, and flowing down into your legs. Melt into the horse instead of gripping on top of it.

    Like I said, you are doing pretty darn well, and I often have the same problem (of gripping up at the canter).
    Thank you. Being on the lunge line has never been an option for me untill I moved to my new school, taking your advise into consideration I might change one of my upcoming lessons to a lunge lesson. I've never seen them in practice but I know my new school does them, is it something you strongly recomend? I've never actually been on the lunge line so im not too sure what it would be like.
    And thank you very much for the compliment, im hoping to come into a little bit of extra money soon so hopefully I can book to have another half an hour lesson a week, which would be nice
         
        06-07-2013, 12:59 PM
      #13
    Super Moderator
    Oh yes! Lunge line lessons are worth their weight in gold.
    It can be scary to surrender control of the horse to the lunge line, but you get to concentrate solely on your seat and the hrose's movement.

    In the Spanish Riding School of Vienna, the riders spend their first TWO YEARS riding only on the lunge.
         
        06-07-2013, 01:04 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinyliny    
    oh yes! Lunge line lessons are worth their weight in gold.
    It can be scary to surrender control of the horse to the lunge line, but you get to concentrate solely on your seat and the hrose's movement.

    In the Spanish Riding School of Vienna, the riders spend their first TWO YEARS riding only on the lunge.
    Im sold, ill book a couple when im finished with my lesson next week
         
        06-07-2013, 02:00 PM
      #15
    Showing
    I agree with Tiny, you are doing very well for your limited practice time. Your upper body doesn't bother me that much because how much you move from the waist up will always depend on the horse's movement. Some horses with smooth movement don't require you to move much to stick with their balance and other horses with big movement, you have to really use those abs and lower back to keep your seat down (which you are doing a really good job of).

    I will also suggest you lengthening your reins a bit so that you are able to keep your elbows a little closer to your sides without getting them pulled so far forward, but the fact that they are going so far does speak well of your hands and their softness. Many people would keep their elbows back where they should be...and end up bumping the horse in the mouth with every stride because their arms aren't fluid. Your arms are fluid and I think if you lengthen the reins just a bit, your arms will fall perfectly where they should be.

    I also notice that your toes point outward quite a bit and you also seem to have a bit of trouble keeping your heels down. That will come with practice and just remembering to work on it.

    You are doing really well .

    Oh, and welcome!
         
        06-07-2013, 02:15 PM
      #16
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smrobs    
    I agree with Tiny, you are doing very well for your limited practice time. Your upper body doesn't bother me that much because how much you move from the waist up will always depend on the horse's movement. Some horses with smooth movement don't require you to move much to stick with their balance and other horses with big movement, you have to really use those abs and lower back to keep your seat down (which you are doing a really good job of).

    I will also suggest you lengthening your reins a bit so that you are able to keep your elbows a little closer to your sides without getting them pulled so far forward, but the fact that they are going so far does speak well of your hands and their softness. Many people would keep their elbows back where they should be...and end up bumping the horse in the mouth with every stride because their arms aren't fluid. Your arms are fluid and I think if you lengthen the reins just a bit, your arms will fall perfectly where they should be.

    I also notice that your toes point outward quite a bit and you also seem to have a bit of trouble keeping your heels down. That will come with practice and just remembering to work on it.

    You are doing really well .

    Oh, and welcome!

    Thank you so much I was excpeting people to tear me apart, but to know people wh actually know what they are talking about are complimenting my position feels really good.
    The next time my instructor asks me what id like to work on, ill definitely point out my feet, and maybe ask to get on a really nice smooth and calm horse for me to completly focus on doing some no sturip work to try and help my heels. However, I have no idea what I would do to make my toes point inwards, any suggestions? Ill ask my instructor next week but id love to know some exercises or something like that to help with that problem if anybody has any suggestions?
         
        06-10-2013, 09:53 PM
      #17
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Four Seasons    
    No, no slack in the reins at all! You must keep contact with the horses mouth. But you are getting pulled into the movement, which is incorrect. You are being forced to move, this has to change. You have to have control over your arms and upper body. If you put your hands just infront of the saddle (which is where they should be at all times) you will get the correct length of reins and won't be pulled around.
    There is a difference between slack and softness! I have a dressage instructor who likes me to "deathgrip" contact in the same way that I imagine yours does, but I prefer a more gentle contact and it seems to work better with my horse. If you are gripping full throttle it is not as easy for the horse to differentiate a light squeeze on the rein. I also feel that softer contact shows the horse that you respect their acceptance of the bit and allows them to find a "happy place" with your hands and what you're asking of them. Does that make sense or sound like hippie mumbo jumbo?

    Anyways, I agree that if you place your hands in the right spot (above the pommel just over or in front of the saddle) and lengthen the reins appropriately for your contact, your arms will look much better. But also keep in mind that you are riding a huuuuge horse with a huuuuge stride and therefore your "following" that big movement might appear exaggerated anyway!
         
        06-10-2013, 10:01 PM
      #18
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hannah2016    
    Thank you so much I was excpeting people to tear me apart, but to know people wh actually know what they are talking about are complimenting my position feels really good.
    The next time my instructor asks me what id like to work on, ill definitely point out my feet, and maybe ask to get on a really nice smooth and calm horse for me to completly focus on doing some no sturip work to try and help my heels. However, I have no idea what I would do to make my toes point inwards, any suggestions? Ill ask my instructor next week but id love to know some exercises or something like that to help with that problem if anybody has any suggestions?

    For pointing your toes inwards, I try to think about wrapping the whole inside of my leg (from calf to ankle to inside foot) around the barrel of the horse as if my leg is a girth! That bendy. In doing so, you'll point more forwards. Unfortunately, the other cure is: to constantly think about pointing your toe forwards until it's muscle memory! Haha.

    You look really great in your lesson video! :) Best of luck!
         
        06-20-2013, 10:35 AM
      #19
    Weanling
    First off I'd like to say you're doing really well for only having a limited time!
    What you're doing with your hands at the canter is correct, you need your hands to flow with the horses mouth to keep the contact. They could be a little quieter, but what you're doing is far better than keeping your hands still and having the contact go from taut to slack with each stride.
    I've also noticed your heels could go further down in the canter. Are you gripping with your leg possibly? Just more practice in the canter (with and without stirrups) will help that.
    I wouldn't be as concerned as you are about your riding though, you're doing great!
         
        06-22-2013, 02:28 PM
      #20
    Trained
    Agree with others about the hands. A little busy, but better to see someone following a little too much than have a death grip on the horse's mouth. Since you are only doing weekly lessons, I don't want to trump what your trainer is telling you. He is obviously doing a nice job with you since you ride that big canter very nicely.

    A tidbit on rein length and movement proportionate to the horse's head: Longer reins with your elbows at your sides will result in far more forward/back hand movement than shorter reins with your hands about an inch higher and forward of the pommel. The latter requires supple elbows, but gives a much more consistent, spongy contact that most horses love. Rein length and contact is something that many riders struggle with, and you can't just play with that alone. It has to also involve the way you are riding the horse in terms of the impulsion and rhythm. Again, this is just info. I like what your instructor is doing with you. When the time comes, I am sure he will impart this knowledge on you.

    Welcome to forum by the way!
         

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