Jumping Critique - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 19 Old 05-24-2009, 12:13 AM Thread Starter
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Jumping Critique

Hi, I've been perusing this site for a while, and have finally decided to create an account. Please critique the horse and rider (me)- be as harsh as you please.

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post #2 of 19 Old 05-24-2009, 12:26 AM Thread Starter
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Here's another. Just a tadd of a long spot
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post #3 of 19 Old 05-24-2009, 04:17 AM
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First of all, welcome to the forum - glad to have you onboard :)

The first thing I see is how much space is between your seat and your saddle. So I look at where your crotch is in align with your saddle. It isn't terribly bad, but your crotch is at the pommel of your saddle. So, you are jumping ahead, not as bad as I've seen, but still none the less.

Same in your 2nd picture. See how much space is bewteen your seat and your saddle and how your crotch is over the pommel of your saddle - signs of a rider jumping ahead.

What we want, is to keep our seats over our horses center of gravity when we are at the base of the fence, where our horses are on their launch position. This way, we aren't throwing our bodies weight onto our horses forehand *as you are doing here* creating their job to be that much difficult. By remaining over the center of our horses gravity, we are aiding them over that fence.

So innitailly, we want to learn to allow our horses to lift us out of our tack - we want to allow our horses to do their job.

So what creates a rider to jump ahead?

- Incorrect leather length - which means no base of support
- Incorrect iron placement - which means lower leg and heels aren't doing their jobs
- Anticipatin of the fence - which means rider is stareing at the fence, riding the fence not their horse

I am going to say - you're anticipating the fence. So, what you are more than likely doing, is that you are staring at the fence on approach, riding to the fence instead of allowing the fence to come to you, riding the fence - not your horse.

You know the fence is there, your horse knows that fence is there - so why are you staring at it? Why are you focused on what is ahead of you, when instead you should be focused on the most important factor to this equation = your horse.

It isn't about the fence. It never is about the fence...it is about your horses rhythm. Ride your horses rhythm, never the fence.

~~~~

Anyways - lets continue on.

So I look at your knee angle, it is good. There should be an angle of 100 - 110 degree's in your knees.

So I then look at your iron placement. It is good as well. The iron should be at the ball of your toes, where the outter bar is placed at your pinky toe and the inner bar at the ball of your big toe. By doing this, we can allow our weight to dispurse into our heels - so that our heels can do their job, which is anchor us into out tack.

But, what do I notice - I notice that you are drastically using the incorrect place on your lower leg. You are using the back of your calf on your horses side, when you should be using the inner part of your calf.

Redistribute your lower leg placement, turn your toes more forward and start using your inside calf.

So, other than that, you look good to me. But lets go back to your jumping ahead -

We must learn to allow our horses to lift us out of our tack, and we must allow our horses to close our hip angle.

So as I mentioned, learn to ride your horses rhythm, not the fence. What you want to do, is sink down into your lower leg - close your knee's and push your toosh back.

You have a lovely horse :)
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post #4 of 19 Old 05-24-2009, 09:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MIEventer View Post
But, what do I notice - I notice that you are drastically using the incorrect place on your lower leg. You are using the back of your calf on your horses side, when you should be using the inner part of your calf.

Redistribute your lower leg placement, turn your toes more forward and start using your inside calf.
Not to completely take this thread off track, but I always wondered why this is? Since I got my spurs I've had to relearn how to use my lower leg... I used to point my toes out, too, but that doesn't go over too well with the spurs. D: I was just wondering why you don't want to use the back of your leg if you don't have spurs.

Every ride, good or bad, teaches you something new.
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post #5 of 19 Old 05-24-2009, 10:37 AM Thread Starter
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MIEventer, you're absolutely correct. Lately I've been throwing myself over the jumps, especially during long spots. Keeping correct contact with my calves has also been an ongoing issue. Any ideas on how to fix it other than just forcing my toes and calves inward?
And lovely horse indeed He's been bucking little children off and taking off lately. He's horrid on the flat but loves to jump.
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post #6 of 19 Old 05-24-2009, 11:40 AM
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Quote:
Not to completely take this thread off track, but I always wondered why this is? Since I got my spurs I've had to relearn how to use my lower leg... I used to point my toes out, too, but that doesn't go over too well with the spurs. D: I was just wondering why you don't want to use the back of your leg if you don't have spurs.
Not a problem, ask away :)

Just sit there on your chair - computer chair, couch, whatever - on the edge. Put yourself into your riding position.

Start with toes forward where your inner calf would be touching your horses side. Feel where your hips are positioned, feel where your knees are positioned, feel your 3 points of your seat *both seat bones and crotch*

Now, turn your toes where they are outwards where the back of your calf would be on your horses side.

Now feel what happens to your hip area, your knees and your seat bones.

It is about effectiveness of your aids, to beable to bring out the best in your horse. Your solidity and effectiveness is altered when you are riding on the back of your calves.

You want your lower leg to be solid at your girth and around your horses side. This improves your effectiveness in your tack, your solidity, your form.

You don't want to strong/nagging of a leg, nor do you want to soft, quiet of a leg - you need perfect balance. An effective leg when needed, a quiet leg when needed.

See how effective a riders form is, when their calves/legs are placed correctly on their horses side:




George Morris:



This rider here shows an excellant example of the proper angle of your toes/calves on horses side:



Does that help?
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post #7 of 19 Old 05-24-2009, 11:41 AM
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Any ideas on how to fix it other than just forcing my toes and calves inward?
Lots of two point, and lots of stirrupless work. Really focus on leg at girth, inner calf on horses side.

Really feel the difference in effectiveness. Teach those muscles as to where they need to be - all it is is muscle memory.
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post #8 of 19 Old 05-24-2009, 12:47 PM
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Hmm, I dunno... feels the same.

Every ride, good or bad, teaches you something new.
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post #9 of 19 Old 05-24-2009, 02:19 PM Thread Starter
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^^Personally I can feel a huge difference when I've got the side of my calves on the horse's side. It affects your whole entire body form. By shifting the pressure to the back of your calves. you shift your whole body structure.
I can feel that I'm much less stable when I use the back of my calves, which is a bad habit I go into when jumping. If you want to think about it this way, more of your calf is in contact with the horse if you're using it effectively- you've got less to aid your horse with if you rely on the back of your calf.
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post #10 of 19 Old 05-24-2009, 02:21 PM
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Well said chevaliernr!
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