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Jumping critique from the show

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        11-15-2009, 08:01 PM
      #11
    Started
    I'm sorry, but that was frightening. Your horse needs some serious schooling on the flat to learn rhythm, control, and balance, and then over LOW fences and gymnastics. It's not his fault, he's trying to save you both, but it is frightening. Look at the jump at 26-29 second in the video. You fling your self up his neck, he catches you, then flings himself over that jump. If his knees had been a fraction lower, you both could have flipped.

    The jump before that, you almost miss because you are tearing around the course with no balance or control. Same with the jump around 31 seconds, you almost miss it and lose alot of time ripping his face around as he skids out. Hlf the speed, twice the balance and you would have made a smooth turn that saved time.

    As for your position, you are way to handsy. You yanks his mouth around (hence the gaping) instead of using your seat and leg to balance him and turn. Over the jump your leg slides back and your jump up his neck.

    Aaack, 41 seconds, he hangs his knees and jumps over his knees so much, again you almost crashed. For your sake and his, please do some low gymnastics and a ton of flat. Get a trainer! One of these days, he's not going to be able to save you and the resulting crash will be a face first tumble.
         
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        11-15-2009, 08:25 PM
      #12
    Trained
    Yeah, sorry but I didn't get very far into it either. In your turns, you're pulling him into the turn with the inside rein instead of turning him properly with both reins/legs/seat. It puts him very off balance and gives you almost no hope of rebalancing his canter between the fences. If he rushes as you say, then practice half halting between fences or even ground poles. After you land from fence one, sit tall, deep, half halt and make sure you get a response. Even if you have to bring him back to a walk to make your point, get a response to your half halt. He needs to start listening to you. If he rushes, fix it. Plain and simple. I just got back from 3 straight days of clinics with world class riders. All of them worked on riders getting their horses listening to them. While the info was harsh in some cases, all of the riders had positive results at the end of the clinics. Please go back to the basics and get that horse listening to you.
         
        11-15-2009, 11:44 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    Unfortunately, Charlibum, you have been given the advice to refrain from jumping so much (you excuse yourself for always doing flatwork, and this may be the case, but all we ever see is jumping photos) and focus purely on the flat several times. In my opinion if one was doing as much flatwork as you claim, your horse would be more balanced and able to approach gymnastic work well.
    I couldn't finish the video. I was alarmed and worried for you both, I was sure you were both going to fall and get injured. How you could even compete with that style is seriously disconcerting. I don't mean to offend, but does it not worry you at the potential risk that your horse is rushing those jumps?! You yourself stated that you know he is, so why put him in that position? In my opinion the reason your horse is rushing is because he's trying to get away from your hand. Every time you yanked on his face, he threw his head up - and of course his vision becomes narrower and he was flinging himself over those jumps. It's nothing to feel accomplished about if I'm honest.


    I do have to say, your horse has a heart of gold. He took as best care as he could of yourself and him doing that round, despite the fact that he shouldn't be faced with that kind of situation. What a sweetheart.

    I'll refrain from saying anything else. I think everyone else has covered it.
         
        11-16-2009, 12:24 AM
      #14
    Weanling
    I myself know this horse personally, was going to buy him actually, but we didnt click. He is always mouthy, always has been, seriously, you can have NO contact on his mouth and he will gape and chew at the bit. Its him. Also he has improved out of sight since she got him. He used to nap so much.
    You have done so well with him Loren. Seriously. You and Charli are a great match :)
         
        11-16-2009, 12:41 AM
      #15
    Weanling
    You guys really are picking on me now and it really hurts to hear you say that I am putting my horse in danger. Its not that bad. I've had Char for over a year now, he is my first horse. And I will not be selling him. He is my world and man does it hit me hard saying things like "Every time you yanked on his face, he threw his head up..." I don't yank on his face, I never ever yank. Ever. I DO use outside rein and leg, I promise. I do not ever, Ever put my horse in a situation were I know he could injure himself or in a situation in which he can't handle himself. He's not rushing into the jumps, his whole round is fast. Its him and its me. And I am working on it. I do difficult grids where he and I must think to complete.

    Yes I do agree we are going to fast. He is improving, you have to have seen him 12 months ago to see that. To appreciate the idea that he was only good for the knackers 14 or so months ago. I must add that in a video of that quality you cannot tell how much of what rein I am using. He does not slip at all at 41 seconds his hind end spins out and I reposition him with my outside rein. I am not trying to cover up the fact that I am only using the inside rein, because I'm not doing that at all. I swear to god he is mouthy. Some times the reins are loose and he still opens it.

    Ohmyitschelle-Your welcome to come and stay at mine and meet Charli if you wish. And see how much I abuse my horse when riding.

    Good on you guys for making me feel like I can't ride and I don't look after my horse. It honestly hurts, bad.
         
        11-16-2009, 12:42 AM
      #16
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CessBee    
    I myself know this horse personally, was going to buy him actually, but we didnt click. He is always mouthy, always has been, seriously, you can have NO contact on his mouth and he will gape and chew at the bit. Its him. Also he has improved out of sight since she got him. He used to nap so much.
    You have done so well with him Loren. Seriously. You and Charli are a great match :)
    I must have written mine when you posted, thanks mal =]
         
        11-16-2009, 12:49 AM
      #17
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by 1dog3cats17rodents    
    I'm sorry, but that was frightening. Your horse needs some serious schooling on the flat to learn rhythm, control, and balance, and then over LOW fences and gymnastics. It's not his fault, he's trying to save you both, but it is frightening. Look at the jump at 26-29 second in the video. You fling your self up his neck, he catches you, then flings himself over that jump. If his knees had been a fraction lower, you both could have flipped.

    The jump before that, you almost miss because you are tearing around the course with no balance or control. Same with the jump around 31 seconds, you almost miss it and lose alot of time ripping his face around as he skids out. Hlf the speed, twice the balance and you would have made a smooth turn that saved time.

    As for your position, you are way to handsy. You yanks his mouth around (hence the gaping) instead of using your seat and leg to balance him and turn. Over the jump your leg slides back and your jump up his neck.

    Aaack, 41 seconds, he hangs his knees and jumps over his knees so much, again you almost crashed. For your sake and his, please do some low gymnastics and a ton of flat. Get a trainer! One of these days, he's not going to be able to save you and the resulting crash will be a face first tumble.
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck    
    Yeah, sorry but I didn't get very far into it either. In your turns, you're pulling him into the turn with the inside rein instead of turning him properly with both reins/legs/seat. It puts him very off balance and gives you almost no hope of rebalancing his canter between the fences. If he rushes as you say, then practice half halting between fences or even ground poles. After you land from fence one, sit tall, deep, half halt and make sure you get a response. Even if you have to bring him back to a walk to make your point, get a response to your half halt. He needs to start listening to you. If he rushes, fix it. Plain and simple. I just got back from 3 straight days of clinics with world class riders. All of them worked on riders getting their horses listening to them. While the info was harsh in some cases, all of the riders had positive results at the end of the clinics. Please go back to the basics and get that horse listening to you.
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ohmyitschelle    
    Unfortunately, Charlibum, you have been given the advice to refrain from jumping so much (you excuse yourself for always doing flatwork, and this may be the case, but all we ever see is jumping photos) and focus purely on the flat several times. In my opinion if one was doing as much flatwork as you claim, your horse would be more balanced and able to approach gymnastic work well.
    I couldn't finish the video. I was alarmed and worried for you both, I was sure you were both going to fall and get injured. How you could even compete with that style is seriously disconcerting. I don't mean to offend, but does it not worry you at the potential risk that your horse is rushing those jumps?! You yourself stated that you know he is, so why put him in that position? In my opinion the reason your horse is rushing is because he's trying to get away from your hand. Every time you yanked on his face, he threw his head up - and of course his vision becomes narrower and he was flinging himself over those jumps. It's nothing to feel accomplished about if I'm honest.


    I do have to say, your horse has a heart of gold. He took as best care as he could of yourself and him doing that round, despite the fact that he shouldn't be faced with that kind of situation. What a sweetheart.

    I'll refrain from saying anything else. I think everyone else has covered it.
    Agree, agree, agree.
    CharliBum I hope for your horse's sake you slow down one day and really think about what people are constantly saying to your posts.
    I see the word "frightening" a LOT. That alone should tell you something. Please stop and think before you and your lovely horse flip over a jump.
         
        11-16-2009, 12:58 AM
      #18
    Weanling
    I do listen and I am constantly doing flat and grid work, and I'm rather sorry for the lack of flat work pictures, I don't have photos taken every time I ride. I can get some of me doing it if you like? What would you guys like pictures of? Here is another from the first day. In the hunters. Please, I swear, really on my family's life that I am not putting my horse in a dangerous position. Really.

         
        11-16-2009, 01:41 AM
      #19
    Started
    To add to what other have said ... I think you need to go back and learn how to steer, count strides and find a distance.

    Your horse is really trying hard for you but if the rider is not doing their job the horse can only do so much... especially when the jumps are of size.

    So to learn your distance and strides I would encourage you to put the jumps down to polls on the ground in between the standards. Put three sets of standards in a line- the 1st and 2nd 7 strides apart and the 2nd and 3rd 3 strides apart. Practice trotting in and cantering through getting 7 and 3 and then 8 and 4 and 6 and 2 ... then canter in and do the same numbers as just stated. This will help you get the feel of bringing your horse back as well as asking him to go forward. You need to MASTER(getting it right on the first try) this before you should move on. This isn't something you master in one rider either ... so once you master that you will put the third pole up to an X ... do the same thing that we did with the numbers above- now after you get that perfect on the FIRST try you can add another jump and you get the point

    Hope that helps...
         
        11-16-2009, 01:45 AM
      #20
    Weanling
    Thanks, I can normally see my strides well but get a bit out with uprights mostly. I am finished with school so tomorrow will be spent setting up grids and trot poles etc.
         

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