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Jumping and Flat Critique

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  • Exercises for jumping ahead of my pony

 
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    12-21-2008, 10:35 PM
  #1
Yearling
Jumping and Flat Critique

I just started jumping lessons about a month ago (I've been riding dressage for a really long time, but no jumping) and was wondering if I could get critique for jumping and flat pictures. Be as brutal as you like, I just want to improve.

5 years ago... lol!
Yes, I know that I wasn't releasing at all and I was really 'posed'. And yes, Ruby is really overweight- she hadn't been ridden in a while because her usual rider (before I started riding her) got injured & couldn't ride.
Please ignore my expression... I'm just weird that way. How can I get my leg more under me? It always seems to slide back really far. And yes, I am jumping ahead.
Are there any exercises that might help me with my position- flat or jumping? I really want to improve and would love it if you guys could help me. Sorry this is such a long post.
     
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    12-21-2008, 10:37 PM
  #2
Yearling
Um... that came out really wide. Sorry. And I realise that I wasn't releasing AT ALL in the 1st picture, and not very much in the 3rd.
     
    12-22-2008, 11:06 PM
  #3
Weanling
Toes up and forward! Way better release in the last picture then the 1st! Overall good job :)
     
    12-23-2008, 04:38 PM
  #4
Yearling
Thanks. Yeah, in the first picture I hardly had a release @ all- my hands were like one inch from Shadow's withers...lol. Thanks for the critique. I'll work on my toes and release.
     
    12-23-2008, 10:12 PM
  #5
Foal
Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by anrz    
I just started jumping lessons about a month ago (I've been riding dressage for a really long time, but no jumping) and was wondering if I could get critique for jumping and flat pictures. Be as brutal as you like, I just want to improve.

5 years ago... lol!
Yes, I know that I wasn't releasing at all and I was really 'posed'. And yes, Ruby is really overweight- she hadn't been ridden in a while because her usual rider (before I started riding her) got injured & couldn't ride.
Please ignore my expression... I'm just weird that way. How can I get my leg more under me? It always seems to slide back really far. And yes, I am jumping ahead.
Are there any exercises that might help me with my position- flat or jumping? I really want to improve and would love it if you guys could help me. Sorry this is such a long post.






Well. Try jumping with no stirrups. And when you are with stirrups, shorten them. And hands up farther on the neck so the horse has more of a release. Other then that you look good =]
Good luck.
     
    12-24-2008, 03:17 AM
  #6
Weanling
For jumping ahead, I always learned to jump by staying in a 2 point approaching all my jumps. I used to jump ahead much more seriously than you do. Just lock your heels down, get in your two-point way ahead of the jump, prep your body find your perfect two point, and just practice not moving. The horse doesn't need your help to jump, just let him/her come up under you. The only way you should be moving when your approaching a jump is just moving your hands forward to allow a release.

Even then, I'd work on your position first and worry about releasing once you have a solid position over the jumps. As long as the horse your riding is forgiving and honest to the jump, I'd just keep a pretty loose rein and practice your position over low jumps, and not worry about releasing. Once you learn not to anticipate the jump and your muscles strengthen, the release should come naturally.

You anticipate the jump, and try to jump it for the horse, which is why you jump ahead. You just have to learn to let the horse do the work and keep your position steady. I've found for myself, that my leg comes back more the weaker my leg muscles are. As much of a pain it is, riding as long as possible in a two point on the flat is going to help you 10 fold over fences. You'll strengthen your back and leg muscles, and even though you'll want to die during it, you'll feel the difference over jumps.

The thing that helps me the most is finding my two point a couple strides out, before the jump, and just concentrate on not moving a muscle through the jump or line. You can usually (or at least I can) feel your faults as soon they happen. I can always feel when my leg slides or my heel comes up, I can definitely feel when I jump ahead. It's all just building muscle and learning not to anticipate.

I agree too, that shortening your stirrups will help. I consider myself a dressage rider by nature and I love myself a looong stirrup. For hunter flat I'd shorten it at least a hole from your dressage saddle, and over fences another hole. It depends on the horse, too though. Fatter/wider horses and ponies will make up for a hole in your stirrups.. I'll have my stirrups adjusted for jumping on a slender horse, then put my saddle on a wider large pony and find myself shortening it a hole or two. That may just be me though.. :P
     
    12-30-2008, 07:20 PM
  #7
Foal
Before you start jumping, you need to have the concept and physical ability to ride with an educated leg, or grip. You should have an even amount of contact from your thigh, inner knee, and calf.

You are pinching with your knee, which is causing your lower leg to slide back. Go back to flatwork, placing all of your weight in your heel. Your joints need to be elastic and flexible. Especially while jumping, your heel needs to take the weight after your landing. If it is stiff and rigid, or your lower leg has swung back, you land hard on your horse.

You are also too far ahead of your horse. It is one thing to recognize that you are ahead of your horse (which you mentioned) and an entirely different thing to understand why. I can see that not only are you ahead, but you are standing up in your stirrups. Your hip angle is too open.

Your release, or lack thereof, is not effective in helping your horse jump. There is a tiny bit of slack in your reins, and luckily, your horse probably did not get hit in the mouth from your hands.

The idea of jumping is fun, but until your basic position is correct, you should not attempt it. Go back to flatwork, practice the "educated grip" and no stirrup work. You will find your seat and be in motion with your horse the right way.

Work on your two-point, closing your hip angle, weight in your heels, and pressing your center back. Hold your position, several circuits around the arena. Practice at the walk, trot, and canter.
You also need to be thinking about your release. Before you start using an advanced automatic release, either slide your knuckles up your horse's crest (simple crest release) or grab mane to not only balance yourself and not snatch back, but feel the process of it.

Hold off on the jumping until you can fix the things I mentioned. If you learn bad habits now, your horse will resent it and they are hard to correct in the future.
     
    12-30-2008, 07:26 PM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by drop_your_reins    
For jumping ahead, I always learned to jump by staying in a 2 point approaching all my jumps. I used to jump ahead much more seriously than you do. Just lock your heels down, get in your two-point way ahead of the jump, prep your body find your perfect two point, and just practice not moving.

I'm sorry that my reply to this may seem harsh, but I am actually quite surprised at this advice.

I believe that you gave her all the advice TO jump ahead. The way to correct it is to wait with your horse, and feel the motion of them closing your hip angle. You can't "pose" in your "perfect two-point" while going up to the jump. It is your job to release, and stay out of the horse's way. By leaning forward that way, you put weight on the forehand, eliminating any chance of helping your horse even if it was your intent.

That method may have been taught to you, drop_your_reins, but I don't doubt that it might have taught you to jump ahead even more.

The reason I did not include advice about jumping ahead in my first reply is because she needs to go back to flatwork first and not think about jumping yet. Perfect your balance and stability with moving with your horse.

Learning the jump process comes with time after flatwork. She needs to sit up to the jump, keeping her chest open and shoulders back. Teaching her to two-point early is only worsening the problem.......
     
    01-04-2009, 10:49 AM
  #9
Yearling
Thanks- all of your advice is really helpful. And why I rode with such a long stirrup is because I had just started jumping lessons and was riding dressage for a LONG time before this, but over the past month my stirrups have gotten a little shorter. Also all of the pictures are from at least a month ago- I have gotten a little better with my leg position. Does anyone have any suggestions for 'non-riding' exercises that I could do? I can only ride once or twice a week at the most (sometimes I have to skip a week because my parents want us to go on a trip) so I don't have a huge amount of time to work on anything, and exercises that I could do at home might help.
     
    03-27-2009, 04:32 PM
  #10
Yearling
Yay! I used all of the suggestions you guys gave me, and my riding teacher said that my leg position has improved a lot, and also that I am not jumping ahead as much! This may seem like a small accomplishment, but for me it is huge.
     

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